diabetestalk.net

Cost Of Insulin Injection In India

Insulin Therapy

Insulin Therapy

WHILST THE USE OF INSULIN IS MANDATORY IN TYPE I PATIENTS, A JUDICIOUS USE OF INSULIN THERAPY MAY BE NECESSARY FOR OPTIMAL MANAGEMENT IN MANY NON INSULIN DEPDENT DIABETICS ! Non dependence does NOT imply that Type II's may never require insulin in order to obtain optimal control. At the same time, there is increasing apprehension that raised levels of insulin in the blood may itself contribute to hypertension, lipid abnormalities and atherosclerosis. In view of this, THE DECISION TO USE INSULIN IN NIDDM SHOULD BE TAKEN AFTER CAREFUL, JUDICIOUS CONSIDERATION. Patients manifesting OHA failure. Insulin should be considered in diabetics with significant complications like ischemic heart disease, CVA, peripheral artery disease, significant retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, hepatic complications such as viral hepatitis. Any diabetic with an acute problem like several infection, injury, etc., should receive insulin. Diabetics with tuberculosis often do better with insulin. Any Type II patient who manifests ketosis for whatever reason. Diabetics undergoing most surgical procedures, especially those requiring general anesthesia, and where the patient will be on intravenous fluids for any significant period of time should be stabilised on insulin. Pregnant diabetics, if not "tightly" controlled with diet alone, must be managed with insulin. Any patient, even if optimally controlled with OHA's who shows evidence that may contraindicate the use of these oral agents, must be shifted to insulin. Many underweight patients and those with significant symptoms would do better with insulin therapy, possibly in combination with small doses of sulfonylureas; The insulins available for routine clinical use are the beef, porcine and human insulins. The insulins available now are the "p Continue reading >>

National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority : Price Notification

National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority : Price Notification

(National Pharmaceuticals Pricing Authority) New Delhi, the 12th March, 2009 S.O.727(E) - In exercise of the powers, conferred by sub-paragraph (1)/(2)/(4) of paragraph 8 of the Drugs (Prices Control) Order, 1995, read with No. S.O. 637 (E) dated the 4th September, 1997 issued by the Government of India in the Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers, the National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority, hereby fixes/revises the prices as specified in column (5) of the table hereto annexed as the retail price/revised retail price, exclusive of excise duty, Sales Taxes/VAT and local taxes, if any, and in column (6) as equivalent MRP inclusive of excise duty, education cess, Sales Tax/VAT in relation to each of the formulation specified in the corresponding entry in column (2) of the said table with the pack size specified in the corresponding entries in column (3) thereof; manufactured/imported by M/s. M.J Biopharm Private Limited *Subject to actual payment of Government levies/taxes, as applicable. (a) The prices fixed are the maximum retail prices in column no. (6) (inclusive of excise duty, sales tax/VAT and local taxes if any) for the specified pack and packs of similar strength, and companies cannot claim exemption on any ground therefrom, unless specifically permitted by the Government/NPPA through an order. (b) The companies / manufacturers may added taxes only if they have paid actually to the Government on the price mentioned in the column (5). If there is any variation in the MRP (inclusive of the taxes), the same may be intimated to the NPPA in the Form-V of DPCO, 1995. (c) For different packing material used or, different drug delivery systems or any other special features/forms claimed, the retail prices, as specified in Column No. 5 above, shall be applicable unless Continue reading >>

Insulin Costs 115 Less, But Diabetics Pay Old Price

Insulin Costs 115 Less, But Diabetics Pay Old Price

Insulin costs 115 less, but diabetics pay old price Insulin costs 115 less, but diabetics pay old price Diabetics in Tamil Nadu can now legally get a 10ml vial of insulin for Rs 115 less, but many medical stores continue to sell it at the printed maximum retail price (MRP). CHENNAI: Diabetics in Tamil Nadu can now legally get a 10ml vial of insulin for Rs 115 less, but many medical stores continue to sell it at the printed maximum retail price (MRP). Pharmaceutical companies brought down the price of insulin after April 1, when Tamil Nadu government exempted insulin from value added tax (VAT). But with no new labels, the old MRP remains on the vials. On March 27, the state's commercial taxes and registration department issued an order exempting all types of insulin from VAT from April 1, 2012. Insulin is an enzyme that helps diabetes patients keep sugar levels under control. Nearly 17% of people in Chennai and more than 12% in rural areas are diabetics. Pharmaceutical companies including Novo Nordisk , Sanofi-Diabetes (Aventis), Wockhardt, Eli Lilly and Biocon told TOI that they had stopped charging VAT for chemists and distributors on all insulin products sold in Tamil Nadu. But the MRP printed on these product packs continued to be inclusive of VAT as it was being packed across the country. "We are evaluating the feasibility of printing the MRP in line with the revised tax structure in Tamil Nadu. We have told doctors, chemists and distributors about the revised prices. We have also released advertisements in newspapers," said a spokesperson from Sanofi- Diabetes. The difference between MRP and the revised rates vary with the kind of product and the manufacturer. Sanofi-Diabetes, for instance, makes 13 insulin products, among which the price difference varies between Continue reading >>

What Is The Cost Of Diabetes Care?

What Is The Cost Of Diabetes Care?

Diabetes management can be an expensive affair. But by following a proper regime you can reduce your overall expenses. As the number of people with diabetes grows worldwide, the disease takes an ever-increasing proportion of not only the patient's household budgets but also the overall healthcare budget. Without primary prevention, the diabetes epidemic will continue to grow. Even worse, diabetes is projected to become one of the world's main disablers and killers within the next twenty-five years. Immediate action is needed to stem the tide of diabetes and to introduce cost effective treatment strategies to reverse this trend. THE SIZE OF THE PROBLEM Diabetes is growing alarmingly in India, home to more than 65.1 million people with the disease, compared to 50.8 million in 2010.Rapid urbanization, demographic transition and lifestyle modifications are major causes for increase in the driving forces that lead to diabetes. By 2030, India's diabetes numbers are expected to cross the 100 million mark according to a 2012 report by International Diabetes Federation.Diabetes is an expensive disease.The chronic nature of the disease and its associated complications are the real reason behind the high cost involved. In India, estimates suggest that 85-95% of all health care costs are borne by individuals and their families from household income as most people are not insured. The number of deaths due to diabetes is likely to be around 4,000,000 deaths year. Many of these diabetes related deaths will mostly be from cardiovascular complications. COST OF ROUTINE DIABETES CARE The costs involved in the care and management of diabetes are considerable for both the individual and the health care system.Caring for diabetics involves a direct cost borne by the affected individuals, the Continue reading >>

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Use Of Insulin Pumps In India: Suggested Guidelines Based On Experience And Cultural Differences

Go to: What Is an Insulin Pump? The continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump (insulin pump for short) is a pager-sized device that can be connected to the body through an infusion set so as to deliver insulin continuously. It consists of a disposable reservoir for insulin and a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion and a tubing system that connects the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Insulin pump therapy by itself is not a new therapy for diabetes mellitus. It is an alternative delivery mechanism for administration of insulin and is found to be superior to ordinary syringes and insulin pens. When insulin is administered subcutaneously via a properly programmed insulin pump, delivery of insulin is expected to mimic the insulin release pattern of a normal healthy pancreas better than other modalities of insulin delivery. Willingness on the part of the patient is absolutely essential before going on the pump. However, mere willingness to initiate pump therapy does not make a patient a candidate for the same. Other indications mentioned below need to be present if a patient is to be considered for pump therapy. Conversely, if a patient who fulfils one or more of the indications is not comfortable wearing the pump even after due explanation and counseling, he or she should not be put on the pump. In India at present, insulin pumps are usually not reimbursable or covered by insurance, and the patient needs to buy the pump and also the consumables, both of which are currently expensive. Cost of the pump is a one-time expense, but the cost of the consumables is a recurring expenditure. Hence, the family should be aware of the continuing expenditure when they decide to start with insulin pump therapy. If they cannot afford it in th Continue reading >>

Cheapest Insulin Injections In India

Cheapest Insulin Injections In India

Insulin injections most commonly recommended to type-1 and type-2 diabetic patients for controlling blood sugar level. It serves the purpose of moving sugar from the blood to the other body tissues for producing energy. As they are required multiple times in a day as recommended by the doctor, it is best to buy cheapest insulin injections in bulk so that you can save good amount money. Cheap insulin injections in India are manufactured by following companies but sold under different brand names: 1. Manufacturing Company: Novo Nordisk India Pvt Ltd Brand/Trade Name: Actrapid 40 iu, 10ml at Rs. 145 Human Insulatard (40iu) – Rs. 140.52 Human Insulatard (100iu) – Rs. 208.95 Human Insulatard (100iu), 3ml – Rs. 208.95 2. Manufacturing Company: Torrent Pharmaceuticals Ltd Brand/Trade Name: Human Actrapid 40iu) at Rs. 158.58 Human Actrapid 40iu), (3ml) at – Rs. 158.58 3. Manufacturing Company: Torrent Pharmaceuticals Ltd Brand/Trade Name: Human Actrapid 40iu) at Rs. 158.58 Human Actrapid 40iu), (3ml) at – Rs. 158.58 4. Manufacturing Company: USV Limited Brand/Trade Name: Human Fastact at Rs. 199.24 Human Fastact, (10ml) at Rs. 199.24 5. Manufacturing Company: Abbott India Ltd. Brand/Trade Name: Human Insulatard at Rs. 197.64 Human Insulatard, (10ml) at Rs. 208.95 Where to buy these low cost insulin injections You can buy these money saving health products online at You can also contact them on +91 124 4616 400 (between 10am and 7pm). You can also order by sending an E-mail to [email protected] Payment options available only cash on delivery. Benefit of ordering from this website is that all the medicines are procured directly from certified pharmacists and regulated manufacturers. Note: Any type of medications mentioned on this site should be taken only after Continue reading >>

Cheaper Insulin Is On The Way

Cheaper Insulin Is On The Way

With commentary by Alissa R. Segal , Pharm.D., RPh, CDE, CDTC, a Clinical Pharmacist at the Joslin Diabetes Center. Biosimilar insulin promises the same blood sugar control at a lower price, but is it as good as brand-name, and will you really save money? The first “biosimilar” insulin—made with a formula that copies an approved, name-brand insulin— is set for sale in the U.S. later this year. Now a new study in the journal Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism says it works as well as the brand-name drug it’s based on. But as insulin costs skyrocket, experts say the “copycat” insulin Basaglar, made by Eli Lilly, may give consumers a small price break—and note that switching may require extra attention to blood sugar levels at first. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Basaglar in late December; it is expected to hit pharmacies in late 2016. The drug has the same basic protein structure as the popular, long-acting insulin glargine Lantus and is made by a similar process. For regulatory reasons, the FDA calls copycat insulin a “follow-on” product, but the drugs are widely described as biosimilars by diabetes experts here and in other countries where they’ve already gained approval or are on sale. The new study, conducted by Eli Lilly, followed 452 type 1s and 299 type 2s who had been using Lantus and switched to Basaglar. After six months, their blood-sugar levels were the same on the new drug. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration (FDA), possible side effects with this insulin are in line with side effect risks with any type of insulin and include hypoglycemia, allergic reactions, injection site reactions, pitting at the injection site, itching, rash, fluid retention and weight gain. 1 Experts contacted by EndocrineWeb say con Continue reading >>

How Drug Price Pressure Helped Sink Novo's Insulin Pill

How Drug Price Pressure Helped Sink Novo's Insulin Pill

November 16, 2016 / 5:42 PM / a year ago How drug price pressure helped sink Novo's insulin pill LONDON (Reuters) - Commercial rather than technical hurdles ultimately torpedoed Novo Nordisks bid to make an oral form of insulin, its chief executive said on Wednesday, underscoring the impact of U.S. price pressure on the worlds top insulin supplier. An insulin pill, saving diabetics from daily injections, has long been seen as the holy grail of diabetes care, yet the Danish group announced last month it was throwing in the towel after several years of work. We actually made a phenomenal scientific achievement in demonstrating to ourselves it is possible to have an insulin tablet, Chief Executive Lars Rebien Sorensen told an industry conference. The problem is that in the reimbursement market we are now facing it is unlikely that such a tablet could be made available at a price that would be acceptable to the payers. Novos decision to scrap the insulin pill programme came as the company slashed its long-term profit growth forecast due to falling U.S. insulin prices, sending its shares into a tailspin. Delivering a protein like insulin as a pill is hard because it risks being destroyed in the stomach. Novo scientists overcame this obstacle to a degree but still needed to deliver around 50 times more insulin in a tablet than in an injection, to ensure a sufficient dose. As a result, the insulin pill in development would have needed to cost far more than a standard injection. While a big premium for convenience might have been commercially viable once in the lucrative U.S. market, it would not be viable today, given the squeeze on prices by pharmacy benefit managers, who administer drug programmes for health plans. Sorensen said the tablet concept, which is also being pursu Continue reading >>

A 93-year-old Drug That Can Cost More Than A Mortgage Payment Tells Us Everything That's Wrong With American Healthcare

A 93-year-old Drug That Can Cost More Than A Mortgage Payment Tells Us Everything That's Wrong With American Healthcare

A person administers an injection of insulin. AP Insulin has been around since 1923, so it came as a surprise in July 2015 when Cole LePere's doctor told his mother, Janine, to prepare to pay a lot at the pharmacy for it. Cole, who was 10, had just been found to have Type 1 diabetes. But even the pharmacist was shocked to see the price. Over and over, the pharmacist told Janine LePere, "This is really expensive." Each time she would respond, "I know, thanks, but I still need the medicine." The pharmacist finally gave the LePeres the supplies — and a bill for $1,550. That was after a $350 coupon. As lawmakers and the public scrutinize dramatic price increases for other old drugs — most recently with the Mylan-owned EpiPen, which saw its cost go up by 500% in the past nine years — the next flash point may be insulin, a drug both ubiquitous and complicated. And the story of why the LePeres are now paying as much as their mortgage payment on insulin, even though they have insurance and even though there are competing drugs on the market, is really the story of what has happened to the healthcare industry in America since the start of the century. The need for insulin The human body produces its own insulin. Some people can't. When he got the diagnosis, Cole LePere found himself one of nearly 29.1 million Americans known to have one of the two types of diabetes. Cole's kind, known as Type 1, is an autoimmune disease. His body mistakenly kills so-called beta cells that are supposed to make the body's insulin, a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food. The roughly 1.25 million people in the US who have Type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin to live. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is something that develops either based on genetic or lifesty Continue reading >>

Insulin Outside America

Insulin Outside America

Dr. Sharad Pendsey is a physician based in Nagpur, India. Pendsey recalls the story of a girl named Sudha who came to him when she was eight-years old. Sudha had just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. When she was discharged from the hospital, Pendsey explained to Sudha’s impoverished parents that she would have to take insulin to stay alive. Pendsey recalls Sudha’s parents asking, “Doctor, if I understand you correctly, Sudha has to take insulin every day for the rest of her life?” Pendsey nodded yes, and said that Sudha would die if she didn’t. The parents understood the predicament, but could not afford the cost of her insulin. One month later, Pendsey learned that Sudha had died. Over 50 Percent of a Family’s Income Beef insulin costs about $1.50 for a 40-unit bottle in India, and beef/pork mixtures go for around the same. A 40-unit bottle of pork insulin costs about $3.20, while a 40-unit bottle of human insulin sells for $5. The average Indian family earns an income of $28 (U.S.) per month, and even less in smaller towns and villages. If a type 1 uses approximately three vials of insulin per month, he or she could spend between 10 and 25 percent of their monthly income on animal insulins. If they use human insulins, they could spend over 50 percent of their monthly income. Despite this reality, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended the universal use of U-100 human insulins, and Eli Lilly has removed animal insulins from most world markets. Indians fear that this removal of animal insulin would impair their control and place an even worse financial burden on them. “If any recommendations to change to U-100 insulins and/or phase out animal insulins is made, I feel this will be a major disaster to most of the diabetics of India,” says Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

The advantages offered by insulin pens may help improve patient adherence. Currently 8.3% of the United States adult population, or 25.8 million people, have diabetes. Of these cases, more than 90% are cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and at least 1 million are estimated to be cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Although a variety of oral medications are available for patients with diabetes, insulins remain an important component of treatment.1,2 Insulins are the standard therapy in patients with T1DM and are ultimately used in patients with T2DM who do not respond adequately to other treatment modalities. Although in some settings insulins may be administered intravenously (eg, with an insulin pump), the vast majority of insulin administrations are subcutaneous injections.1,2 Available Forms and Administration In the United States, 2 types of insulins are available: recombinant human insulins and insulin analogs. Recombinant human insulin is available from 2 manufacturers (Humulin by Eli Lilly and Novolin by Novo Nordisk); each of these is available in a regular form and in a longer-acting neutral protamine hagedorn (NPH) form. Unlike recombinant human insulins, insulin analogs are structurally modified forms of insulin that are designed to either lower blood sugar rapidly or maintain low blood sugar levels over time. These insulin analogs may be classified as rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. Rapid-acting insulins include insulin lispro, insulin aspart, and insulin glulisine, and long-acting insulins include insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Premixed formulations of insulin are also available.1,2 Regardless of the differences between insulin formulations, all conventional types of insulin can be administered subcutaneously. Subcutaneous injectio Continue reading >>

Travel In India With Type 1 Diabetes – Insulin Availability And Pricing

Travel In India With Type 1 Diabetes – Insulin Availability And Pricing

In late July 2011, exactly 7 months after Amy was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, we backpacked around India for four weeks, in a trip we called Monsoon Meandering. This is post 9 in the series about that trip and its planning and how type 1 diabetes played a part. This post is not borne from experience but from information some of my good friends in India have provided me, following questions asked via the #DOC (Twitter diabetes online community). I’d like to thank my friends Gautam, Madhu and Yogesh for their help in getting me the information for this article. NOTE: If you’re interested in diabetes supplies other than insulin take a look at this post: buying diabetes supplies in India Insulin availability A quick straw poll of some UK Twitter users gave me a list of the most frequently used fast and slow acting insulins: (all sources courtesy of my friend Gautam.) Fast-acting – Novarapid – is available, including flex pens. source Fast-acting – Humalog – is available. source Slow-acting – Lantus – is available. source Slow-acting – Levemir – flex-pens are available, can’t confirm about cartridges. source IMPORTANT UPDATE: Since posting this article last night my friend Gretchen, who is insulin dependant and travelling in India at the moment, has said that she could not find Humalog anywhere in Puri or Kolkata (Calcutta), even though getting it in those places is not meant to be a problem. Bear in mind that whilst Puri is tiny and only has a population of 200,000, Kolkata is a major city with a population of 5 million. Both are on the west coast so perhaps Humalog is not readily available there? Insulin – example pricing Using the sources listed under ‘Insulin availability’ above as of now – 6th January 2013 – the following prices apply Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Insulin

The Cost Of Insulin

The price of insulin has more than tripled in ten years. Not everybody pays full price, but many find the cost of insulin complicates their life. This week, we’ll cover why insulin prices are so high. Next week, we’ll address what to do about it. According to this story on CBS News, people with diabetes are “cutting back [on their insulin doses] or even going without the drug,” putting them at greater risk for complications. Insulin costs have soared from $100–$200 per month a few years ago to $400–$500 a month now. CBS News quotes a college student saying her bill for insulin has risen from $130 to $495 per month. She has given up her insulin pump and gone back to injections because of expense. One of her friends has cut her dose down to 80% of what’s ordered to save money. This has become common practice for many. A doctor in Montana reported that insulin prices greatly complicate people’s care. “I have patients who tell me that they have to make a decision between food and insulin, and their rent and insulin.” Why is this happening? When insulin was discovered the 1920s, the doctors who found it gave it away. It immediately started saving lives for people with Type 1 diabetes. Now insulin has become a $24-billion-a-year market globally and is predicted to pass $48 billion in only five more years. And people around the world who need it can’t afford it. There are several causes for the price spikes, but many of them come down to America’s pretend “free market” approach to health care. We are seeing these problems now with the controversy over one brand of epinephrine injections, whose manufacturer increased their price by 500% and then paid their CEO a nearly $19 million salary. Here are some ways American economics are making insulin unaff Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.s.?

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.s.?

Dr. Jeremy Greene sees a lot of patients with diabetes that's out of control. In fact, he says, sometimes their blood sugar is "so high that you can't even record the number on their glucometer." Greene, a professor of medicine and history of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, started asking patients at his clinic in Baltimore why they had so much trouble keeping their blood sugar stable. He was shocked by their answer: the high cost of insulin. Greene decided to call some local pharmacies, to ask about low-cost options. He was told no such options existed. "Only then did I realize there is no such thing as generic insulin in the United States in the year 2015," he says. Greene wondered why that was the case. Why was a medicine more than 90 years old so expensive? He started looking into the history of insulin, and has published a paper about his findings in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The story of insulin, it turns out, starts back in the late 1800s. That's when scientists discovered a link between diabetes and damaged cells in the pancreas — cells that produce insulin. In the early 1920s, researchers in Toronto extracted insulin from cattle pancreases and gave it to people who had diabetes, as part of a clinical trial. The first patient was a 14-year-old boy, who made a dramatic recovery. Most others recovered as well. Soon, insulin from pigs and cattle was being produced and sold on a massive scale around the world. But for some, the early forms of the medicine weren't ideal. Many people required multiple injections every day, and some developed minor allergic reactions. Over the next few decades, scientists figured out how to produce higher-quality insulin, Greene says. They made the drug purer, so recipients had fewer bad reaction Continue reading >>

More in insulin