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Cost Of Insulin In Canada Vs Us

This Is Why Canada Has The Second-highest Medication Costs In The World

This Is Why Canada Has The Second-highest Medication Costs In The World

Madonna Broderick spent 23 years living on the streets of Toronto, struggling with addiction. “I’ve been clean 15 years but my health has caught up with me,” says the 59-year-old. She now has many chronic illnesses – including diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and fibromyalgia. And, like many low-income Canadians, she has had a tough time paying for her multiple medications. Broderick receives government disability payments of about $600 a month for basic needs and coverage for her 10 regular medications and insulin, which would otherwise soak up more than half her monthly allowance. But being prescribed a medication that’s not covered causes considerable financial stress. “Last year I needed an additional medication. It was $80 a month, and it was the difference between me being comfortable and uncomfortable. But I couldn’t afford it. … Anything extra like that is my grocery money,” she said. Broderick’s dilemma throws the spotlight on a dirty little secret: Canadian medications prices are the second highest globally and we pay far too much for generic drugs. It is not uncommon for patients like Broderick, with complex health issues, to end up hundreds of dollars a month out of pocket because of their prescriptions. Many Canadians stop taking the drugs they need because they can’t afford them. More than one in 10 don’t fill a prescription because of cost, says a 2012 Canadian Medical Association Journal study. South of the border, price increases of medications such as the EpiPen continue to make headlines. Two-thirds of Americans surveyed in a September Kaiser health poll favoured importing drugs from Canada because of rising prices. But they might not realize Canada is not much better than the U.S. when it comes to drug co Continue reading >>

Millions Of Americans Find Drug Savings In Canada

Millions Of Americans Find Drug Savings In Canada

Millions of Americans whose insurance won't cover the cost of their prescription medications say they are finding relief over the border. Doctors diagnosed Larry Rehberger with diabetes decades ago. Since then, Rehberger says he has watched the price of insulin climb in recent years. "It's spooky," Rehberger said. Rehberger has Medicare, and it doesn't fully cover his insulin costs. His two-month supply goes for $1,508.94 in the US. That is more than Rehberger can afford. "I don't know how. I'm on social security. I'd never make it," Rehberger said. "That's 90-95% of your social security before you ever do anything." Larry started making the trip from Northern Washington to Canada to buy insulin about a year and a half ago when he heard about the savings. "It's diabetes," Rehberger said. "To stay alive, you have to spend the money." Rehberger isn't alone. The Centers for Disease Control estimates four to five million Americans fill their prescriptions internationally each year. An organization known as the Canadian International Pharmacy Association, which regulates online pharmacies in Canada, said their members had at least one million American customers to date in 2016 and of those, 23,000 live in Washington. It's no wonder why people are crossing the border. Unlike the US, Canada places restrictions on what drugmakers can charge, making most any drug available in the US, out of pocket, available in Canada for less. A study by the International Federation of Health Plans compared price differences. If found Cymbalta, which treats depression, was $84 less in Canada. Humira, for rheumatoid arthritis, was $296 less in Canada, and Gleevec, which treats cancer, was $5,073 less in Canada. "They are manufactured by the same pharmaceutical companies," said Rebecca Kelley, ex Continue reading >>

Soaring Insulin Prices Have Diabetics Feeling The Pain

Soaring Insulin Prices Have Diabetics Feeling The Pain

Insulin price spike leads to lawsuitInsulin is fast becoming a medication that only the well-insured or well-heeled diabetic can afford. With the price of insulin more than tripling in a decade, some diabetics are having to make tough choices about how to pay for the medication. In some cases, diabetics are cutting back or even going without the drug. Many of the 26 million Americans with diabetes must use insulin daily to treat the disease, or else risk illnesses such as kidney failure and disabilities such as blindness. While American diabetics may have faced monthly costs of $100 to $200 several years ago, some are now grappling with costs of $400 to $500 per month. Insulin prices for American patients are far higher than in other countries, a recent survey of patients from the advocacy group T1International discovered. American diabetics said they pay $13.47 per milliliter for Eli Lilly’s (LLY) Humalog insulin, the highest price among the countries surveyed and about four times more than what Canadian diabetics pay. “People are suffering a lot,” said Allison Bailey, a college student in Iowa with Type 1 diabetes. “There are no generics. We have to go through these big companies, and they charge so much.” Bailey said she paid about $130 for several vials of Eli Lilly’s Humalog in 2010. This year, her insulin prescription has a price tag of about $495. She noted that she switched from using pump therapy in 2010 and now injects insulin with a pen, and that while the prices aren’t apples-to-apples, costs have overall sharply increased. She said she should go back to pump therapy, but she doesn’t believe she can afford it given the higher cost of insulin as well as the expense of a pump, which can cost more than $5,000. Others are also caught in a bind. B Continue reading >>

Buying Insulin In Canada Without A Prescription (btc)

Buying Insulin In Canada Without A Prescription (btc)

With insulin prices skyrocketing, no wonder the diabetic community is taking to social media to network and share their experiences as they swap tips and tricks not only for moral support, but also financial. This month, we received an interesting consumer comment via our Facebook page asking if we knew that Americans are driving to Canada to buy insulin without a prescription. Well, no. As our primary focus is mail-order pharmacy, it wasn’t on our radar. Nevertheless, it sparked our interest and we’d like to share our findings with the PharmacyChecker community. After calling 20 pharmacies across Canada (specifically in the following cities: Québec City, Toronto, Alberta, Victoria, Winnipeg and Regina) the answer is clear: Americans can obtain insulin without a prescription in Canada. All pharmacists that I called reported—rather matter-of-factly—that you do not need a prescription for any insulin product, which would include Lantus Solostar, Humalog and Levemir. We specifically talked about Lantus Solostar, a popular, long-acting insulin. The price in Canada for a three-month supply of Lantus Solostar (3 ml) is currently around $447.00 while the average retail price in the U.S. is a staggering $1,160.39. Apparently, they practice what they preach: all patients—including Americans—do not need a prescription to obtain insulin in Canada. While a prescription is not needed, the drugs are available only from the pharmacist and must be retained within an area of the pharmacy where there is no public access and no opportunity for patient self-selection (also known in the U.S. as Behind the Counter (BTC). There are some important nuances about insulin sales in Canada that might interest you. To start, insulin is not on the Health Canada Prescription Drug List. He Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

Critical Condition: Cheaper In Canada

Critical Condition: Cheaper In Canada

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. Canada's national health plan pays for doctor visits and hospital stays. But outside the hospital unless a patient is 65 or older, or on welfare the government plan does not cover prescription drugs. Canadians, like Americans, must get insurance from an employer or independently, or else pay the full cost of medications themselves. Karen Ireland, 54, who lives in Oakville, Ontario, has Parkinson's disease. She's on five different medications. "I do find it very expensive," she told ABCNEWS. Expensive, yes, but a steal compared to what she would pay in the United States. When her prescription drug costs are converted into U.S. dollars, the price difference is significant: Mirapex, for Parkinson's disease: $157 in Canada vs. $263 in the United States.Celexa, for depression: $149 in Canada vs. $253 in the United States. Diovan, for high blood pressure: $149 in Canada vs. $253 in the United States. Oxazepam, for insomnia: $13 in Canada vs. $70 in the United States. Seroquel, for insomnia: $33 in Canada vs. $124 in the United States. "Oh my gosh," said Ireland after learning of the price differences. "I don't know how they [Americans] do it. That is, that is a shock!" Canadians are spared higher drug prices, in large part because of price controls. The Canadian government has established a "Patented Medicine Prices Review Board" to ensure drug prices are not excessive. "They look at the price of the drug," said Dr. Allan Detsky, a pharmacoeconomist at the University of Toronto, "and they say, 'You know what, we have no idea what the long-run costs of development are, but they can't possibly be that high. Forget it.' " The review board has established a very specific formula for drug companies wi Continue reading >>

Why Are Canadas Prescription Drugs So Much Cheaper Than Ours?

Why Are Canadas Prescription Drugs So Much Cheaper Than Ours?

Why Are Canadas Prescription Drugs So Much Cheaper Than Ours? If you are a current Subscriber and are unable to log in, you may have to create a NEW username and password. To do so, click here and use the NEW USER sign-up option. Why Are Canadas Prescription Drugs So Much Cheaper Than Ours? Why Are Canadas Prescription Drugs So Much Cheaper Than Ours? US drug prices are out of controlBernie Sanders wants to change that. Pills of the painkiller, hydrocodone at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vermont, August 31, 2016. (AP Photo / Toby Talbot) Sign up for Take Action Now and well send you three meaningful actions every Tuesday. Thank you for signing up. For more from The Nation, check out our latest issue . Subscribe now for as little as $2 a month! The Nation is reader supported: Chip in $10 or more to help us continue to write about the issues that matter. Sign up for Take Action Now and well send you three meaningful actions you can take each week. Be the first to hear about Nation Travels destinations, and explore the world with kindred spirits. Did you know you can support The Nation by drinking wine? The US-Canadian border, where hundreds of billions of dollars in goods and services are traded freely between countries each year, is a critical lifeline for the North American economy. But the same porous divide marks the line between life and death for millions of Americans, thanks to drug monopolies holding them hostage to brutally overpriced medicines. Though Congress has resisted reform for years, public outrage over the industrys profiteering is rising as volatile drug markets have priced both insured patients and the uninsured poor out of essential medicines. Now that Trumpcare threatens to further deregulate the health-care industry, progressive lawmakers hope to chip Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Insulin

The Cost Of Insulin

The price of insulin has more than tripled in ten years. Not everybody pays full price, but many find the cost of insulin complicates their life. This week, we’ll cover why insulin prices are so high. Next week, we’ll address what to do about it. According to this story on CBS News, people with diabetes are “cutting back [on their insulin doses] or even going without the drug,” putting them at greater risk for complications. Insulin costs have soared from $100–$200 per month a few years ago to $400–$500 a month now. CBS News quotes a college student saying her bill for insulin has risen from $130 to $495 per month. She has given up her insulin pump and gone back to injections because of expense. One of her friends has cut her dose down to 80% of what’s ordered to save money. This has become common practice for many. A doctor in Montana reported that insulin prices greatly complicate people’s care. “I have patients who tell me that they have to make a decision between food and insulin, and their rent and insulin.” Why is this happening? When insulin was discovered the 1920s, the doctors who found it gave it away. It immediately started saving lives for people with Type 1 diabetes. Now insulin has become a $24-billion-a-year market globally and is predicted to pass $48 billion in only five more years. And people around the world who need it can’t afford it. There are several causes for the price spikes, but many of them come down to America’s pretend “free market” approach to health care. We are seeing these problems now with the controversy over one brand of epinephrine injections, whose manufacturer increased their price by 500% and then paid their CEO a nearly $19 million salary. Here are some ways American economics are making insulin unaff Continue reading >>

Canada Vs Usa

Canada Vs Usa

New Member Soon to be Husband to a Type 1 I have recently proposed to my girlfriend (now she's my fiancee!!) who has Type 1 diabetes. While dating her I have researched and understood what diabetes is and issues with it. I am still fairly new to diabetes and will probably be reading posts to understand more about it so I can be the best husband that I can potentially be! Right now we have a huge decision to make. We currently live in separate countries which gives us many options. I currently live in the USA and she lives in Canada. We are trying to decide which country would be better from a health care perspective (There are many other issues we are looking at too, but this one is pretty important). Both countries are significantly different in the way they handle health care and we have been trying to research it. I ask you all for your experiences with either the Canadian health care system or the US health care system or even someone who has had significant experience with both! I am also wondering how much (just an approximation dollars per year) it costs to be a Type 1 diabetic in either country. Thank you all for your help! I'm sure I'll be reading other posts and hopefully one day I will be able to help someone out with my experiences with diabetes! (if there is already a thread on this, can someone please lead me to it! Thanks again) Hi there. I am in the unique position of being Canadian and getting the bulk of my health care here, but have gone to the US (and paid a hefty sum despite some insurance) and received health care there. Overall, there are excellent doctors everywhere, but as a person with diabetes, I would definitely favour (note the Canuck spelling) Canada and here is why. As a person with diabetes, you won't have to worry about being covered fo Continue reading >>

The Burden Of Out-of-pocket Costs For Canadians With Diabetes

The Burden Of Out-of-pocket Costs For Canadians With Diabetes

Government coverage of diabetes medications, devices and supplies varies across jurisdictions, leaving some costs for these supports to be borne directly by people living with diabetes in order to effectively manage their disease. Since 2001, Diabetes Canada has tracked out-of-pocket expenses for Canadians with diabetes using specific composite type 1 and type 2 case studies with low incomes, and compared them across provinces and territories. These composite case studies have enabled Diabetes Canada to compare and track public drug programs and their ability to support access to diabetes medications, devices and supplies for individuals with similar circumstances. Report Continue reading >>

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.s.?

Why Is Insulin So Expensive In The U.s.?

Dr. Jeremy Greene sees a lot of patients with diabetes that's out of control. In fact, he says, sometimes their blood sugar is "so high that you can't even record the number on their glucometer." Greene, a professor of medicine and history of medicine at Johns Hopkins University, started asking patients at his clinic in Baltimore why they had so much trouble keeping their blood sugar stable. He was shocked by their answer: the high cost of insulin. Greene decided to call some local pharmacies, to ask about low-cost options. He was told no such options existed. "Only then did I realize there is no such thing as generic insulin in the United States in the year 2015," he says. Greene wondered why that was the case. Why was a medicine more than 90 years old so expensive? He started looking into the history of insulin, and has published a paper about his findings in this week's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The story of insulin, it turns out, starts back in the late 1800s. That's when scientists discovered a link between diabetes and damaged cells in the pancreas — cells that produce insulin. In the early 1920s, researchers in Toronto extracted insulin from cattle pancreases and gave it to people who had diabetes, as part of a clinical trial. The first patient was a 14-year-old boy, who made a dramatic recovery. Most others recovered as well. Soon, insulin from pigs and cattle was being produced and sold on a massive scale around the world. But for some, the early forms of the medicine weren't ideal. Many people required multiple injections every day, and some developed minor allergic reactions. Over the next few decades, scientists figured out how to produce higher-quality insulin, Greene says. They made the drug purer, so recipients had fewer bad reaction Continue reading >>

Prescription Drug Prices Have Americans Looking To Canada

Prescription Drug Prices Have Americans Looking To Canada

Prescription Drug Prices Have Americans Looking To Canada Life-saving prescription drugs have undergone dramatic price hikes in the U.S. and it's causing some Americans to turn to Canada. Floridian Darby Leigh told the Toronto Star she was shocked when she discovered it would cost her US$600 for two EpiPens. Her husband, originally from Ontario, suggested she buy the medication from Canada, where she was able to get a two-pack for a third of the cost. An EpiPen can cost $300 in the U.S. (Photo: Getty) EpiPens can halt a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction and the drugs expire in just 18 months, making them a costly and regular occurrence for families. Unlike Canada, the U.S. doesn't regulate drug prices. So pharmaceutical companies can set prices as they please. What we do have to protect against these rapid price increases is a regulatory body, the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board (PMPRB). It regulates price increases our prices cant go astronomically high very quickly because there are regulatory restrictions on price growth," Steve Morgan, a health policy professor at the University of British Columbia, told the National Post. " our prices cant go astronomically high very quickly because there are regulatory restrictions on price growth." Diabetics are another group that has turned to Canada amid price hikes. In the U.S, the cost of insulin has dramatically increased. Prices for Humalog, a rapid-acting insulin, has grown 700 per cent since 1996, The Washington Post reported. For a diabetic, long periods without insulin can result in blindness, nerve problems, heart and kidney failure, and eventually death. In the U.S. a 10-milliliter vial of Humalog roughly a one month supply can cost over US$250 out of pocket, according to U.S. prescription price co Continue reading >>

Verify: Insulin Cheaper In Canada

Verify: Insulin Cheaper In Canada

LOCAL NBC Nightly News reports that the price of insulin, which is used to treat Diabetes, has shot up more than 1,000 percent in the U.S. in the past 20 years. 2 On Your Side was able to confirm and verify that the injectable form of insulin in a pre-loaded pen is actually much, much less expensive in Canada than the U.S. Fort Erie, Canada - NBC Nightly News reports that the price of insulin, which is used to treat Diabetes, has shot up more than 1,000 percent in the U.S. in the past 20 years. In fact, it's estimated the U.S. now spends more than $322 billion dollars each year to treat the disease. It has reached the point where some families are now taking desperate measures to get the vital medication their children and loved ones need to survive. That includes turning to the black market as some parents rely on secret online groups to swap and trade the insulin that their insurance covers so that they can obtain the insulin for their kids. Back in February, a similar situation unfolded with another drug many people depend on for epileptic seizures. A Two On Your Side investigation with Reporter Steve Brown found that people here could get epipens much cheaper and legally at pharmacies in Canada. 2 On Your Side was able to confirm and verify that the same is true for insulin. We determined that the injectable form of insulin in a pre-loaded pen is actually much, much less expensive in Canada then in the U.S. That's crucial for some people with diabetes who need the insulin to control blood sugar levels And considering that about eleven percent of Western New York residents are diabetic, according to a local doctor at UBMD Internal Medicine, it's especially important. At the Remedy's RX drug store in Fort Erie, Ontario, Canadian pharmacist Gerard Longval says diabetic Continue reading >>

True Or False: You Can Buy Insulin From Canada

True Or False: You Can Buy Insulin From Canada

True or false: It's illegal for U.S. residents to order and receive prescription medication from pharmacies in Canada. Okay, how about this one - True or false: It's illegal for Canadian pharmacies to ship prescription medications to U.S. residents. The answer: False! Did you get all that? Allow me to explain... So, a couple of weeks ago the news broke that Google got into heaps of trouble with the FDA for allowing Canadian pharmacies to post their ads on American websites using their AdWords service. Of course, Google's $500 million settlement was more like a slap on the wrist considering how much the company is worth, but it drove home the point that Canadian pharmacies — and actually all international pharmacies — are not supposed to sell their goods to U.S. residents. It's against the Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act, which specifically states that it is illegal to import controlled substances and unapproved prescription drugs, whether the product is a foreign-made version of a U.S.-approved drug or the exact same drug that U.S. manufacturers send to Canada. So even if the factory makes the same insulin for both the Canadian market and the U.S., Canada cannot legally turn around and export the insulin to the U.S. Yep, it's true. What FDA Forbids Apparently the folks at FDA have positively convinced themselves that all drugs from outside the United States are evil. Well, sort of... In 2003, William Hubbard (then commissioner and later founder of the advocacy group Alliance for a strong FDA) testified before the Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness House Committee on Government Reform that: "In our experience, many drugs obtained from foreign sources that either purport to be or appear to be the same as U.S.-approved prescription drugs are, in fact, of unknown qu Continue reading >>

U.s. Pays More Than Any Other Country For Prescription Drugs

U.s. Pays More Than Any Other Country For Prescription Drugs

State that the drugs will be shipped from a foreign country Are not licensed by a state board of pharmacy in the U.S. (or equivalent state health authority) Are licensed by the state board of pharmacy in your state and the state where the pharmacy is operating Have a state-licensed pharmacist to answer your questions Levitt noted that most medication sold in America is imported from other countries. If we can do that safely it begs the question why people are saying we cant import low-cost medications safely, he said. The argument against it is often hyperbolic claims about unsafe drugs. Affordable and Safe Prescription Drug Importation Act Cities, counties, school districts and everyday consumers are not the only ones taking a stance on importation of prescription drugs. The bill includes specific requirements to ensure the safety of imported drugs. Provisions include: a clear definition of what drugs may be imported Senators and state representatives are proposing and supporting legislation that would lower the cost of prescription drugs by allowing Americans to import safe, low-cost medicine from Canada. In February 2017, Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Cory Booker (D-N.J.) and Bob Casey (D-Pa.) introduced the Affordable and Safe Prescription Importation Act. The legislation would instruct the secretary of Health and Human Services to put forward regulations allowing wholesalers, pharmacies and individuals to import qualifying prescription drugs from licensed Canadian sellers. It would also grant the secretary authority in two years to permit importation from countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development that have standards for the approval and sale of prescription drugs that are comparable to those in the U.S. Reps. Elijah E. Cummings (D-Md. Continue reading >>

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