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Cost Of Diabetes In India Study

Excess Cost Burden Of Diabetes In Southern India: A Clinic-based, Comparative Cost-of-illness Study

Excess Cost Burden Of Diabetes In Southern India: A Clinic-based, Comparative Cost-of-illness Study

This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef . Atun, RifatDavies, Justine IGale, Edwin A MBrnighausen, TillBeran, DavidKengne, Andre PascalLevitt, Naomi SMangugu, Florence WNyirenda, Moffat JOgle, Graham DRamaiya, KaushikSewankambo, Nelson KSobngwi, EugeneTesfaye, SolomonYudkin, John SBasu, SanjayBommer, ChristianHeesemann, EstherManne-Goehler, JenniferPostolovska, IrynaSagalova, VeraVollmer, SebastianAbbas, Zulfiqarali GAmmon, BenjaminAngamo, Mulugeta TerekegnAnnamreddi, AkhilaAwasthi, AnanyaBesanon, StphaneBhadriraju, SudhamayiBinagwaho, AgnesBurgess, Philip IBurton, Matthew JChai, JeanneChilunga, Felix PChipendo, PortiaConn, AnnaJoel, Dipesalema REagan, Arielle WGishoma, CrispinHo, JuliusJong, SimchaKakarmath, Sujay SKhan, YasminKharel, RamuKyle, Michael ALee, Seitetz CLichtman, AmosMalm, Carl PMbaye, Mamouna NMuhimpundu, Marie AMwagomba, Beatrice MMwangi, Kibachio JosephNair, MohitNiyonsenga, Simon PNjuguna, BensonOkafor, Obiageli L O Okunade, OluwakemiPark, Paul HPastakia, Sonak DPekny, ChelseaReja, AhmedRotimi, Charles NRwunganira, SamuelSando, DavidSarriera, GabrielaSharma, AnshumanSidibe, AssaSiraj, Elias SSyed, Azhra SVan Acker, KristienandWerfalli, Mahmoud2017.Diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa: from clinical care to health policy.The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology,Vol. 5,Issue. 8,p.622. View all Google Scholar citations for this article. Excess cost burden of diabetes in Southern India: a clinic-based, comparative cost-of-illness study There are few data on excess direct and indirect costs of diabetes in India and limited data on rural costs of diabetes. We aimed to further explore these aspects of diabetes burdens using a clinic-based, comparative cost-of-illness study. Persons with diabet Continue reading >>

(pdf) Health-care Cost Of Diabetes In South India: A Cost Of Illness Study

(pdf) Health-care Cost Of Diabetes In South India: A Cost Of Illness Study

Journal of Research in Pharmacy Practice / Jul-Sep 2013 / Vol 2 / Issue 3 Healthcare cost of diabetes in South India: A cost of illness study Sadanandam Akari1, Uday Venkat Mateti1,2, Buchi Reddy Kunduru3 Objective: The objective of this study is to analyze the healthcare cost by calculating the direct and indirect costs of diabetes with comorbidities in south India. Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted at Rohini super specialty hospital (India). Patient data as well as cost details were collected from the patients for a period of 6 months. The study was approved by the hospital committee prior to the study. The diabetic patients of age >18 years, either gender were included in the study. The collected data was analyzed for the average cost incurred in treating the diabetic patients and was calculated based on the total amount spent by the patients to that of total number of patients. Findings: A total of 150 patients were enrolled during the study period. The average costs per diabetic patient with and without comorbidities were found to be United States dollar (USD) 314.15 and USD 29.91, respectively. The average cost for those with diabetic complications was USD 125.01 for macrovascular complications, USD 90.43 for microvascular complications and USD 142.01 for other infections. Out of USD 314.15, the average total direct medical cost was USD 290.04, the average direct nonmedical cost was USD 3.75 and the average total indirect cost was USD 20.34. Conclusion: Our study results revealed that more economic burden was found in male patients (USD 332.06), age group of 5160 years (USD 353.55) and the patients bearing macrovascular complications (USD 142.01). This information can be a model for future studies of economic evaluations and outcomes resear Continue reading >>

Cost-effectiveness Study Of Antidiabetic Drugs In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients From Mumbai, India | Limaye | International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health

Cost-effectiveness Study Of Antidiabetic Drugs In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients From Mumbai, India | Limaye | International Journal Of Community Medicine And Public Health

Cost-effectiveness study of antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients from Mumbai, India Dnyanesh Limaye, Krishna Todi, Jay Shroff, Ashutosh Ramaswamy, Priyanka Kulkarni, Vaidehi Limaye, Gerhard Fortwengel Background: Diabetes is fast gaining the status of a potential epidemic in India, with >62 million individuals currently diagnosed with the disease. India currently faces an uncertain future in relation to the potential burden that diabetes may impose on the country. An estimated US$ 2.2 billion would be needed to sufficiently treat all cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in India. Many interventions can reduce the burden of this disease. However, health care resources are limited; thus, interventions for diabetes treatment should be prioritized. The present study assesses the cost-effectiveness of antidiabetic drugs in patients with T2DM from Mumbai, India. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was performed to assess the cost-effectiveness of antidiabetic drugs in patients with T2DM. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by using a validated questionnaire in a total of 152 (76 males, 76 females) patients with T2DM from F-North Ward, Mumbai, India. Cost-effectiveness was determined on the basis of cost of antidiabetic drug/s, efficacy, adverse drug reactions, safety of administration, frequency of administration, and bioavailability. Results: For treatment of T2DM in non-obese participants, Glimepiride+Pioglitazone costed least (`3.7) per unit of effectiveness followed by Glimepiride (`6.6), Gliclazide (`8.1), Repaglinide (`24.5), and Vildagliptin (`45.2). For treatment of T2DM in obese participants, Metformin cost least (` 6.7) per unit of effectiveness followed by Glimepiride + Metformin (`5.9) and Repaglinide (`24.5). Conclusions: In ca Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Type 2 Diabetes And Its Complications In India And Economic Costs To The Nation

Prevalence Of Type 2 Diabetes And Its Complications In India And Economic Costs To The Nation

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition volume 71, pages 816824 (2017) | Download Citation Diabetes, a major lifestyle disorder, has become a global burden, and the prevalence rates are rising steeply in developing economies. Rapid socioeconomic transition with urbanization and industrialization are the main causes for the global diabetes epidemic. Among developing economies, the highest increase in number of people with diabetes is in China followed by India. In India, the epidemic of diabetes continue to increase and is experiencing a shift in diabetes prevalence from urban to rural areas, the affluent to the less privileged and from older to younger people. Diabetes is a progressive disorder leading to complications, which are broadly divided into small vessel or microvascular disease and large vessel or macrovascular disease. Microvascular complications affect the inner part of the eyethe retina known as diabetic retinopathy, the kidney termed as diabetic nephropathy and the peripheral nerves termed as diabetic neuropathy. The macrovascular complications affect the heart, the brain and the peripheral arteries termed as cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease and peripheral vascular disease, respectively. Given the lifelong expenditure associated with diabetes and its complications, individuals, families and the society are unable to cope with the economic, emotional and social disease burden due to diabetes. The economic burden of diabetes can be reduced by providing universal healthcare coverage, access to affordable medicines and early detection and treatment of the disorder. This emphasizes the need for a multi-prolonged strategy to minimize the burden of diabetes and its complications. Continue reading >>

Contents Acronyms ................................................................................................................................... 2

Contents Acronyms ................................................................................................................................... 2

1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................. 3 1.1 Prevention and treatment of diabetes ............................................................................... 5 2 Magnitude of the problem........................................................................................................ 6 2.1 Global burden of diabetes ................................................................................................ 6 2.2 Burden of diabetes in India .............................................................................................. 7 2.3 Socioeconomic burden..................................................................................................... 7 2.4 Diabetes in the elderly.....................................................................................................10 3 Management of diabetes .......................................................................................................11 3.1 Diagnosis of diabetes .......................................................................................................11 3.2 Treatment of diabetes ......................................................................................................13 3.3 Treatment of diabetes in the elderly ................................................................................14 4 Health system response to diabetes in India .........................................................................16 4.1 Health-care system ..........................................................................................................16 4.2 Human resource capacity .................................................................................... Continue reading >>

Resources And Tools

Resources And Tools

Diabetes Voice is the quarterly magazine of IDF. It covers the latest developments in diabetes care, education, prevention, research, health policy and economics, as well as themes related to living with diabetes. Diabetes Voice goes to the heart of issues that are crucial to all those who can further the promotion of diabetes care, prevention, and a cure worldwide. Editor-in-Chief: Dr Douglas Villarroel (Bolivia) As of July 2018, Diabetes Voice is available as a new digital platform at diabetesvoice.org . Archive content of the magazine is available below. It is estimated that the overall prevalence of diabetes in India is about 7.3 % if both the urban and rural population is taken into consideration.1 In addition, according to the newly released IDF Diabetes Atlas, 8th edition (2017), the national prevalence for diabetes (20-79 years) in India is estimated to be 8.8%. One consideration is certain: the prevalence of diabetes in urban India seems to be higher among those states which are economically stronger.1 An important observation seems to be the fact that in some of the economically well-to-do states, the prevalence of diabetes among the urban poor appears to be going up.1 This fact probably reflects the higher genetic susceptibility of Asian Indians to diabetes. Since the urban poor also have this higher genetic susceptibility, they seem to develop diabetes when the environmental factors become favourable. These factors include weight gain with increased food intake and reduced physical activity when those who are economically below the margins get a two wheeler like a motorcycle or scooter to ride to work. However, the fact remains that the urban poor have a meagre income to take care of their daily needs and have difficulty to pay for diabetes care. Though the Continue reading >>

(pdf) The Economic Burden Of Diabetes In India: A Review Of The Literature

(pdf) The Economic Burden Of Diabetes In India: A Review Of The Literature

Background: Diabetes and its complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in India, and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is on the rise. This calls for an assessment of the economic burden of the disease. Objective: To conduct a critical review of the literature on cost of illness studies of diabetes and its complications Methods: A comprehensive literature review addressing the study objective was conducted. An extraction table and a scoring system to assess the quality of the studies reviewed were developed. Results: A total of nineteen articles from different regions of India met the study inclusion criteria. The third party payer perspective was the most common study design (17 articles) while fewer articles (n =2) reported on costs from a health system or societal perspective. All the articles included direct costs and only a few (n =4) provided estimates for indirect costs based on income loss for patients and carers. Drug costs proved to be a significant cost component in several studies (n =12). While middle and high-income groups had higher expenditure in absolute terms, costs constituted a higher proportion of income for the poor. The economic burden was highest among urban groups. The overall quality of the studies is low due to a number of methodological weaknesses. The most frequent epidemiological approach employed was the prevalence-based one (n =18) while costs were mainly estimated using a bottom up approach (n =15). Conclusion: The body of literature on the costs of diabetes and its complications in India provides a fragmented picture that has mostly concentrated on the direct costs borne by individuals rather than the healthcare system. There is a need to develop a robust methodology to perform methodologically rigorous and transparent Continue reading >>

The Economic Burden Of Diabetes In India: A Review Of The Literature

The Economic Burden Of Diabetes In India: A Review Of The Literature

Abstract Diabetes and its complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in India, and the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is on the rise. This calls for an assessment of the economic burden of the disease. To conduct a critical review of the literature on cost of illness studies of diabetes and its complications in India. A comprehensive literature review addressing the study objective was conducted. An extraction table and a scoring system to assess the quality of the studies reviewed were developed. A total of nineteen articles from different regions of India met the study inclusion criteria. The third party payer perspective was the most common study design (17 articles) while fewer articles (n =2) reported on costs from a health system or societal perspective. All the articles included direct costs and only a few (n =4) provided estimates for indirect costs based on income loss for patients and carers. Drug costs proved to be a significant cost component in several studies (n =12). While middle and high-income groups had higher expenditure in absolute terms, costs constituted a higher proportion of income for the poor. The economic burden was highest among urban groups. The overall quality of the studies is low due to a number of methodological weaknesses. The most frequent epidemiological approach employed was the prevalence-based one (n =18) while costs were mainly estimated using a bottom up approach (n =15). The body of literature on the costs of diabetes and its complications in India provides a fragmented picture that has mostly concentrated on the direct costs borne by individuals rather than the healthcare system. There is a need to develop a robust methodology to perform methodologically rigorous and transparent cost of illness studies to inform Continue reading >>

Review Diabetes Care In India

Review Diabetes Care In India

Abstract Diabetes has become a major health care problem in India with an estimated 66.8 million people suffering from the condition, representing the largest number of any country in the world. The rising burden of diabetes has greatly affected the health care sector and economy in India. The goal of health care experts in India is to transform India into a diabetes care capital in the world. An expert detailed review of the medical literature with an Asian Indian context was performed. Recent epidemiologic studies from India point to a great burden from diabetes. Diabetes control in India is far from ideal with a mean hemoglobin A1c of 9.0%—at least 2.0% higher than suggested by international bodies. Nearly half of people with diabetes remain undetected, accounting for complications at the time of diagnosis. Screening can differentiate an asymptomatic individual at high risk from one at low risk for diabetes. Despite the large number of people with diabetes in India, awareness is low and needs to be addressed. Other challenges include balancing the need for glycemic control with risk reduction due to overly tight control, especially in high-risk groups and taking into account health care professional expertise, attitudes, and perceptions. Pharmacologic care should be individualized with early consideration of combination therapy. Regular exercise, yoga, mindful eating, and stress management form a cornerstone in the management of diabetes. Considering the high cost incurred at various steps of screening, diagnosis, monitoring, and management, it is important to realize the cost-effective measures of diabetes care that are necessary to implement. Result-oriented organized programs involving patient education, as well as updating the medical fraternity on various deve Continue reading >>

What Is The Cost Of Diabetes Care?

What Is The Cost Of Diabetes Care?

Diabetes management can be an expensive affair. But by following a proper regime you can reduce your overall expenses. As the number of people with diabetes grows worldwide, the disease takes an ever-increasing proportion of not only the patient's household budgets but also the overall healthcare budget. Without primary prevention, the diabetes epidemic will continue to grow. Even worse, diabetes is projected to become one of the world's main disablers and killers within the next twenty-five years. Immediate action is needed to stem the tide of diabetes and to introduce cost effective treatment strategies to reverse this trend. THE SIZE OF THE PROBLEM Diabetes is growing alarmingly in India, home to more than 65.1 million people with the disease, compared to 50.8 million in 2010.Rapid urbanization, demographic transition and lifestyle modifications are major causes for increase in the driving forces that lead to diabetes. By 2030, India's diabetes numbers are expected to cross the 100 million mark according to a 2012 report by International Diabetes Federation.Diabetes is an expensive disease.The chronic nature of the disease and its associated complications are the real reason behind the high cost involved. In India, estimates suggest that 85-95% of all health care costs are borne by individuals and their families from household income as most people are not insured. The number of deaths due to diabetes is likely to be around 4,000,000 deaths year. Many of these diabetes related deaths will mostly be from cardiovascular complications. COST OF ROUTINE DIABETES CARE The costs involved in the care and management of diabetes are considerable for both the individual and the health care system.Caring for diabetics involves a direct cost borne by the affected individuals, the Continue reading >>

Indmedica - Journal Of The Academy Of Hospital Administration

Indmedica - Journal Of The Academy Of Hospital Administration

A Study of the Direct Costs Incurred by Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients for their Treatment at a Large Tertiary-Care Hospital in Karnataka, India Author(s): V.P. Bhaskaran*, N.R. Rau**, Satyashankar***, Ravi Raj Acharya****, Chinnappa S. Metgud*****, Tarun Koshy****** Background:Much has been said about the socio-economic changes sweeping acrossIndia and the effect it is having on the population. Prevalence ofdiseases hitherto considered "rich man's disease", are disturbingly onthe rise across all categories of society. One of the most morbid amongthese is Diabetes Mellitus. The cost of treatment of this disease perse and its accompanying complications can ruin families. The median annual direct medical cost for patient with Type-II DM without complications was Rs. 14,507/-. Patients with Type-II DM and CRF requiring dialysis spent 14 times than those without any associated complications. About 80% patients self finance their treatment; and spent about 50% on drugs and 21% on hospitalisation. Average length of stay was 10.3 days, and average expenditure incurred as indoor patient was Rs. 871.85/-. Keywords : Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus, Cost of Treatment, OHA, Insulin. Decision makers need to have India-specific cost information in order to develop an accurate picture of diabetes management. We studied 150 patients (100 out-patients and 50 in-patients) withType-2 Diabetes Mellitus visiting one Unit in the Department ofMedicine at our hospital from March 2000 to September 2001. Demographiccharacteristic, age at diagnosis, diabetes treatments, complicationsand details of expenses was collected using a questionnaire and medicalchart reviews. The median annual direct medical costs for patients with Type-2diabetes mellitus without complications, was Rs. 14,507/-. Patientswit Continue reading >>

Cost Of Diabetes In India: Age, Gender,spend Of Patients Statistics Infographic

Cost Of Diabetes In India: Age, Gender,spend Of Patients Statistics Infographic

India is the second largest country in the world with 65.1 Million diabetes patients as of 2013 data.As per the estimates of WHO, 101.2 Million people will suffer from diabetes by 2030. As per idf.org report, at least, one Million people dead in 2013 because of diabetes. On a mean average, each diabetic patient in India is spending around Rs 5,230 for diabetic treatment which includes the cost of medicines, consultation and hospital charges. Patients in Urban areas are paying more than Rs 10,000 per year while as patients in rural area are spending around Rs 6,250 per year. However, the people below poverty line are not in a position to purchase quality medicines for diabetes. With this, the annual economic burden or expenditure in 2013 is Rs 34,650 CRORE in India. However, the average spending for diabetes treatment in India($84) is very less when compared with most developed and developing countries in the world. 90% of diabetes cases in India are due to change in lifestyle, obesity and family history. Busy life, stress at work, irregular eating habits, smoking, consuming alcohol, lack of sound sleep, lack of physical activities, etc. are changing the lifestyle of people that is impacting on health. The below infographic provides more details about diabetes in India. Cost of diabetes in India Age, gender, spend of patients Statistics Infographic Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is India's Fastest Growing Disease: 72 Million Cases Recorded In 2017, Figure Expected To Nearly Double By 2025

Diabetes Is India's Fastest Growing Disease: 72 Million Cases Recorded In 2017, Figure Expected To Nearly Double By 2025

Diabetes is India's fastest growing disease: 72 million cases recorded in 2017, figure expected to nearly double by 2025 India IndiaSpend Apr 17, 2018 16:10:11 IST Mumbai:Indias economic development has brought higher incomesand a large helping of diabetes. As salaries have increased, and all socio-economic groups have experienced a rise in living standards, diabetesa condition caused by the bodys inability to regulate insulin levels, which can lead to tissue damage and organ failurebecame the countrys fastest growing disease burden over 16 years to 2016. India currently represents 49 percent of the worlds diabetes burden, with an estimated 72 million cases in 2017, a figure expected to almost double to 134 million by 2025. This presents a serious public health challenge to a country facing a future of high population growth and a government attempting to provide free health insurance to half a billion people. Diabetes prevalence has increased by 64 percent across India over the quarter-century, according to a November 2017 report by the Indian Council for Medical Research, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, both research institutes, and the Public Health Foundation of India, an advocacy. In 1990, Indias per capita income was $380 (Rs 24,867), rising 340 percent to $1,670 (Rs 1,09,000) in 2016, as per data from the World Bank . Over the same period, the number of diabetes cases increased by more than 123 p ercent. Amongst the wealthiest quintilethe surveyed group were divided into five equal groups according to wealth2.9 percent of women and 2.7 percent of men reported they had diabetes when asked in the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) 2015-16 . These rates are almost triple those found in the lowest quintile (0.8 percent for women and 1.0 percent for me Continue reading >>

Economic Burden Of Diabetes Mellitus In Western India: A Hospital Based Study | Prajapati | International Journal Of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology

Economic Burden Of Diabetes Mellitus In Western India: A Hospital Based Study | Prajapati | International Journal Of Basic & Clinical Pharmacology

Economic burden of diabetes mellitus in western India: a hospital based study Arpit Prajapati, Nitin Kothari, Barna Ganguly Background: Descriptive cost of illness study can provide an overall picture of diabetes in monetary terms in developing country, which may serve as a vital source of information for health care organizations and planning bodies to plan and prioritize local health policies and schemes. The aim was to explore cost description of diabetes in a tertiary care hospital in Anand district of Gujarat, India. Methods: This was an observational study with one year follow up. Ethical approval was taken from IEC. Patients were recruited and were divided into three categories according to duration of diabetes; newly diagnosed cases as category I, diabetes since last 5 year as category II and since last 10 years as category III. All these patients were followed up with 4 visits. Cost was calculated into three components; direct medical, direct non-medical and indirect cost. Descriptive and regression analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0. Results: Total 90 patients were analyzed after 12 patients were lost to follow up, 30 in each category. Mean total cost was found to be 12391.84 INR. Contributions from direct medical cost, direct non-medical cost and indirect cost were 74%, 2% and 24% respectively. Maximum cost incurred was due to medicine cost (44.14%) followed by complication cost (43.34%). Conclusions: Heavy economic burden highlights the urgent need for the health care organizations to plan and prioritize policies and accordingly in prevention and management of diabetes and its complications. Cost of illness, Direct cost, Indirect cost Davey PG, Malik M, Dodd T, MacDonald T. Pharmacoeconomics and Drug Prescribing. In: Speight TM, Holford NHG, editors. Continue reading >>

Health-care Cost Of Diabetes In South India: A Cost Of Illness Study

Health-care Cost Of Diabetes In South India: A Cost Of Illness Study

Health-care cost of diabetes in South India: A cost of illness study Sadanandam Akari ,1 Uday Venkat Mateti ,1,2 and Buchi Reddy Kunduru 3 1Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharm D, St. Peter's Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Rohini Super Specialty Hospital, Kakatiya University, Warangal, Andhra Pradesh, India 1Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharm D, St. Peter's Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Rohini Super Specialty Hospital, Kakatiya University, Warangal, Andhra Pradesh, India 2Department of Pharmacy Management, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India 1Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharm D, St. Peter's Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Rohini Super Specialty Hospital, Kakatiya University, Warangal, Andhra Pradesh, India 2Department of Pharmacy Management, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India 3Department of General Medicine, Rohini Super Specialty Hospital, Warangal, Andhra Pradesh, India Corresponding author: Uday Venkat Mateti, E-mail: [email protected] Copyright : Journal of Research in Pharmacy Practice This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The objective of this study is to analyze the health-care cost by calculating the direct and indirect costs of diabetes with co-morbidities in south India. A prospective observational study was conducted at Rohini super specialty hospital (India). Patient data as well as cost details were collected from the patients for a period of 6 months. The study was approved by the hospital committee prior to the stu Continue reading >>

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