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Cloudy Insulin Name

Diabetes And Insulin

Diabetes And Insulin

On this page: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is a chronic and potentially life-threatening condition where the body loses its ability to produce insulin, or begins to produce or use insulin less efficiently, resulting in blood glucose levels that are too high (hyperglycaemia). Blood glucose levels above the normal range , over time, can damage your eyes, kidneys and nerves, and can also cause heart disease and stroke. An estimated 280 Australians develop diabetes every day. Diabetes is Australia's fastest-growing chronic disease. The main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes develops when the cells of the pancreas stop producing insulin. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells of the muscles for energy. Instead the glucose rises in the blood causing a person to become extremely unwell. Type 1 diabetes is life threatening if insulin is not replaced, and people need to inject insulin for the rest of their lives. Type 1 diabetes often occurs in children and people under 30 years of age, but it can occur at any age. This condition is not caused by lifestyle factors. Its exact cause is not known but research shows that something in the environment such as the rubella virus can trigger it in a person that has a genetic risk. The body’s immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas after the person gets a virus because it sees the cells as foreign. Most people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes do not have family members with this condition. For more information about symptoms, visit the Diabetes type 1 fact sheet. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes develops when the pancreas does not make enough insulin and the insulin that is made does not work as well as it should (also known as insulin resistan Continue reading >>

Insulin Types

Insulin Types

What Are the Different Insulin Types? Insulin Types are hormones normally made in the pancreas that stimulates the flow of sugar – glucose – from the blood into the cells of the body. Glucose provides the cells with the energy they need to function. There are two main groups of insulins used in the treatment of diabetes: human insulins and analog insulins, made by recombinant DNA technology. The concentration of most insulins available in the United States is 100 units per milliliter. A milliliter is equal to a cubic centimeter. All insulin syringes are graduated to match this insulin concentration. There are four categories of insulins depending on how quickly they start to work in the body after injection: Very rapid acting insulin, Regular, or Rapid acting insulins, Intermediate acting insulins, Long acting insulin. In addition, some insulins are marketed mixed together in different proportions to provide both rapid and long acting effects. Certain insulins can also be mixed together in the same syringe immediately prior to injection. Rapid Acting Insulins A very rapid acting form of insulin called Lispro insulin is marketed under the trade name of Humalog. A second form of very rapid acting insulin is called Aspart and is marketed under the trade name Novolog. Humalog and Novolog are clear liquids that begin to work 10 minutes after injection and peak at 1 hour after injection, lasting for 3-4 hours in the body. However, most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH insulin and are used as “bolus” insulins to be given 15 minutes before a meal. Note: Check blood sugar level before giving Humalog or Novalog. Your doctor or diabetes educator will instruct you in determini Continue reading >>

Insulin In The Uk

Insulin In The Uk

Tweet Insulin may be a key part of your treatment if you suffer from diabetes. Insulin enables your body to use glucose. Different types of insulin can act very differently in different people. Insulin regime suitable for individual patients are tailored by your diabetes care team. Type or dosage of insulin can be changed if required to meet the individual needs of the patient. Insulin can be packaged in vials (bottles), cartridges or prefilled pens. The vials are used with syringes, whereas the cartridges are used with pen injectors. Prefilled pens are disposable pen injectors, which contain insulin. Prefilled pens are useful for people with dexterity or visual problems. List of insulins The table highlights the various insulin types, their manufacturers, the insulin source and how it's available. It also highlights insulin ranges that have been discontinued. Insulin type Name Manufacturer Type Source Rapid-acting analogue Apidra Sanofi analogue vial & cartridge Apidra Sanofi analogue prefilled pen Humalog Lilly analogue vial & cartridge Humalog Lilly analogue prefilled pen Novorapid Novo Nordisk analogue vial Novorapid Penfill Novo Nordisk analogue cartridge Novorapid Novolet Novo Nordisk analogue prefilled pen Long-acting analogue Lantus Sanofi analogue vial, cartridge & prefilled pen Levemir Novo Nordisk analogue cartridge & prefilled pen Tresiba Novo Nordisk analogue cartridge & prefilled pen Short-acting Human Actrapid Novo Nordisk human vial Actrapid Pen* Novo Nordisk human prefilled pen Actrapid Penfill* Novo Nordisk human cartridge Human Velosulin* Novo Nordisk human vial Pork Actrapid* Novo Nordisk pork vial Humaject S* Lilly human prefilled pen Humulin S Lilly human vial & cartridge Hypurin Bovine Neutral CP Pharmaceuticals beef vial & cartridge Hypurin Porci Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection: Two Bottle Injection Instructions

Insulin Injection: Two Bottle Injection Instructions

Wash your hands. Pick up the CLOUDY bottle and turn it upside down. Roll the bottle gently between your hands to mix the insulin. Wipe the top of both (clear and cloudy) bottles with alcohol. Remove the caps from the top and bottom of the syringe. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for your CLOUDY insulin dose as ordered. Insert the needle into the CLOUDY bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the CLOUDY bottle. Withdraw the empty syringe from the bottle. Set the bottle aside. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for the CLEAR insulin dose as ordered. Insert the needle into the CLEAR bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the CLEAR bottle. Leave the needle in the bottle. Turn the bottle upside down with the needle in it. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for the CLEAR insulin dose. Look for air bubbles in the syringe. If you see air bubbles in the syringe, push the insulin back into the bottle, and repeat steps 17 and 18. Pull the bottle away from the needle, and set aside the CLEAR bottle. Pick up the CLOUDY bottle of insulin. Turn the CLOUDY bottle upside down and push the needle into the bottle. Be very careful not to move the plunger. Pull the plunger down and withdraw the correct number of units for the CLOUDY insulin. The plunger should now be on the unit mark showing the total units of both the CLEAR and CLOUDY types of insulin. For example, 6 units of CLEAR insulin are already in the syringe. Add 14 units of CLOUDY insulin for a total of 20 units in the syringe. Pull the bottle away from the needle. Set both bottles on the table. Look for air bubbles in the syringe. If you see air bubbles, discard the dose and begin again. Set the syringe down. Do not let the needle touch anything. Pinch or spread the skin a Continue reading >>

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

Learn how to mix insulin clear to cloudy. Drawing up and mixing insulin is a skill that nurses will utilize on the job. Insulin is administered to patients who have diabetes. These type of patients depend on insulin so their body can use glucose. Therefore, nurses must be familiar with how to mix insulin. The goal of this article is to teach you how to mix insulin. Below are a video demonstration and step-by-step instructions on how to do this. How to Mix Insulin Purpose of mixing insulin: To prevent having to give the patient two separate injections (hence better for the patient). Most commonly ordered insulin that are mixed: NPH (intermediate-acting) and Regular insulin (short-acting). Important Points to Keep in Mind: Never mix Insulin Glargine “Lantus” with any other type of insulin. Administer the dose within 5 to 10 minutes after drawing up because the regular insulin binds to the NPH and this decreases its action. Check the patient’s blood sugar and for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia to ensure they aren’t hypoglycemic …if patient is hypoglycemic hold the dose and notify md for further orders. Key Concept for Mixing Insulin: Draw up CLEAR TO CLOUDY Remember the mnemonic: RN (Regular to Nph) Why? It prevents contaminating the vial of clear insulin with the cloudy insulin because if contaminated it can affect the action of the insulin. Why does this matter because they will be mixed in the syringe? You have 5 to 10 minutes to give the insulin mixed in the syringe before the action of the insulins are affected Demonstration on Drawing Up Clear to Cloudy Insulin Steps on How to Mix Insulin 1. Check the doctor’s order and that you have the correct medication: Doctor’s order says: “10 units of Humulin R and 12 units of Humulin N subcutaneous before b Continue reading >>

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful because the needles are short and thin and the insulin shots are placed into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. In some cases, the doctor prescribes a mixed dose of insulin. This means taking more than one type of insulin at the same time. A mixed dose allows you to have the benefits of both short-acting insulin along with a longer acting insulin — without having to give 2 separate shots. Usually, one of the insulins will be cloudy and the other clear. Some insulins cannot be mixed in the same syringe. For instance, never mix Lantus or Levemir with any other solution. Be sure to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or diabetes educator before mixing. These instructions explain how to mix two different types of insulin into one shot. If you are giving or getting just one type of insulin, refer to the patient education sheet Insulin: How to Give a Shot. What You Will Need Bottles of insulin Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Syringe with needle (You will need a prescription to buy syringes from a pharmacy. Check with your pharmacist to be sure the syringe size you are using is correct for your total dose of insulin.) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of a Syringe and Needle You will use a syringe and needle to give the shot. The parts are labeled below. Wash the work area (where you will set the insulin and syringe) well with soap and water. Wash your hands. Check the drug labels to be sure they are what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date o Continue reading >>

What Does Cloudy Insulin Mean?

What Does Cloudy Insulin Mean?

What does it mean when your insulin gets cloudy after several weeks? Insulin can changewhen stored, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Many factors speed up the change, including warm temperatures and shaking the insulin bottle. Thats why the ADA recommends that you avoid carrying your insulin in your pocket, especially if you are an active person. Keep it in a refrigerator, cupboard, purse, briefcase or backpack, and protect it from heat and motion. If regular insulin becomes cloudy, throw it away, says the ADA. It has lost its effectiveness, and wont keep your blood sugar from getting too high. If your insulin is a mix of regular and NPH or ultralente insulins, you may be getting NPH or ultralente in the bottle of regular insulin. This, too, will make it cloudy. If in doubt, discard the old bottle and replace it with a new one. Reprinted from 101 Tips for Improving Your Blood Sugar by the University of New Mexico Diabetes Care Team. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Thanks for signing up for our newsletter! You should see it in your inbox very soon. Continue reading >>

Humulin N

Humulin N

HUMULIN® N (human insulin [rDNA origin]) isophane) Suspension DESCRIPTION HUMULIN N (human insulin [rDNA origin] isophane) suspension is a human insulin suspension. Human insulin is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli. HUMULIN N is a suspension of crystals produced from combining human insulin and protamine sulfate under appropriate conditions for crystal formation. The amino acid sequence of HUMULIN N is identical to human insulin and has the empirical formula C257H383N65O77S6 with a molecular weight of 5808. HUMULIN N is a sterile white suspension. Each milliliter of HUMULIN N contains 100 units of insulin human, 0.35 mg of protamine sulfate, 16 mg of glycerin, 3.78 mg of dibasic sodium phosphate, 1.6 mg of metacresol, 0.65 mg of phenol, zinc oxide content adjusted to provide 0.025 mg zinc ion, and Water for Injection. The pH is 7.0 to 7.5. Sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid may be added during manufacture to adjust the pH. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management

Diabetes Management

There are four main types of insulin, as well as insulin combination medications. The four main types are: Insulin was once obtained exclusively from pig or cow pancreas. Today, regular and intermediate-acting insulins are referred to as human insulins, because they are manufactured to be identical to the insulin produced by the human pancreas. Rapid- and long-acting insulins are chemically modified forms of human insulin. Most individuals need to use more than one type of insulin, so they either mix two types of insulin together or buy prepared (premixed) insulin mixtures. The insulin types differ in three ways: Onset—the length of time it takes for the insulin to reach the bloodstream and begin lowering blood glucose. Peak activity—the period of time during which insulin has its maximum effect in lowering blood glucose. Duration—the amount of time the insulin continues to lower blood glucose. Regular or short-acting insulin This type of insulin is manufactured to be similar to the insulin produced in the human body. Popular brands have an "R" (for regular) in their names, for example, Humulin R and Novolin R. Regular insulin is typically injected 30–60 minutes before meals and usually reaches the bloodstream within 30 minutes, in time to cover the rise in blood glucose that begins after food is eaten. Insulin action peaks one and a half to two hours after injection and the effects last about eight to 10 hours. Rapid-acting insulin Insulin aspart (Novolog), insulin lispro (Humalog), and insulin glulisine (Apidra) are called insulin analogues, because their chemical structure is a modified form of human insulin that is designed to work more quickly and peak faster than regular insulin. These manufactured insulins are safer to use because they work more closely t Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin - Topic Overview

Types Of Insulin - Topic Overview

Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulin Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting Apidra (insulin glulisine) Clear 5-15 minutes 30-60 minutes 3-5 hours Humalog (insulin lispro) Clear 5-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 3-5 hours NovoLog (insulin aspart) Clear 5-15 minutes 40-50 minutes 3-5 hours Afrezza (insulin human, inhaled) Contained in a cartridge 10-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 2½-3 hours Short-acting Humulin R, Novolin R (insulin regular) Clear 30 minutes 1½-2 hours 6-8 hours Intermediate-acting Humulin N, Novolin N (insulin NPH) Cloudy 1-4 hours 4-12 hours 14-24 hours Long-acting Lantus (insulin glargine) Clear 1-2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Levemir (insulin detemir) Clear 2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by the human pancreas. It quickly Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Make sure you have the type (beef and pork, pork, or human) and the strength of insulin that your doctor ordered for you. You may find that keeping an insulin label with you is helpful when buying insulin supplies. The concentration (strength) of insulin is measured in USP Insulin Units and USP Insulin Human Units and is usually expressed in terms such as U-100 insulin. Insulin doses are measured and injected with specially marked insulin syringes. The appropriate syringe is chosen based on your insulin dose to make measuring the dose easy to read. This helps you measure your dose accurately. These syringes come in three sizes: 3/10 cubic centimeters (cc) measuring up to 30 USP Units of insulin, ½ cc measuring up to 50 USP Units of insulin, and 1 cc measuring up to 100 USP Units of insulin. It is important to follow any instructions from your doctor about the careful selection and rotation of injection sites on your body. There are several important steps that will help you successfully prepare your insulin injection. To draw the insulin up into the syringe correctly, you need to follow these steps: Wash your hands with soap and water. If your insulin contains zinc or isophane (normally cloudy), be sure that it is completely mixed. Mix the insulin by slowly rolling the bottle between your hands or gently tipping the bottle over a few times. Never shake the bottle vigorously (hard). Do not use the insulin if it looks lumpy or grainy, seems unusually thick, sticks to the bottle, or seems to be even a little discolored. Do not use the insulin if it contains crystals or if the bottle looks frosted. Regular insulin (short-acting) should be used only if it is clear and colorless. Remove the colored protective cap on the bottle. Do not Continue reading >>

Table Of Commonly Used Insulins Available In The Uk

Table Of Commonly Used Insulins Available In The Uk

Table of commonly used insulins available in the UK Table of commonly used insulins available in the UK Note: The usual action times for the insulins described will vary slightly from person to person. Hypurin porcine and bovine insulin will continue to be available for the foreseeable future. Made by Wockhardt UK There are many different regimens. One of the most common (in the UK) for people to be started on, is Mixtard 30 given twice a day (morning and teatime). which is 30% short acting soluble insulin (Actrapid type) mixed with 70% of NPH (Isophane Insulin). Novomix 30 is 30% of fast acting insulin analogue and 70% intermediate acting insulin (NPH). New, modern insulinregimens consists of multiple injections of Short acting insulin with meal and or large snacks and 1 or 2 injections of long acting insulin, or biphasic insulin (like NovoMix or Humalog mix 25 or Novomix or Mixtard 30). Please notedifferent strengths/proportions of short acting insulin of Mixtard i.e Mixtard 20, 40, 50. These have been discontinued and you can now only obtain Mixtard 30 Continue reading >>

Mixing Insulin

Mixing Insulin

License Here How Do You Mix Insulin? Your doctor or diabetes educator may ask you to mix a short-acting or clear insulin with an intermediate or long acting cloudy insulin in the same syringe so that both can be given at the same time. Keep in mind: The only insulin that cannot be mixed is insulin Glargine. Mixing Insulin In this example, the doctor has asked you to mix 10 units of regular, clear, insulin with 15 units of NPH cloudy insulin, to a total combined dose of 25 units. Always, draw “clear before cloudy” insulin into the syringe. This is to prevent cloudy insulin from entering the clear insulin bottle. Always do this procedure in the correct order, as shown in the following sequence. Roll the bottle of the cloudy insulin between your hands to mix it. Clean both bottle tops with an alcohol wipe. Pull back the plunger of the syringe to the dose of the long-acting (cloudy) insulin in this example 15 units. You now have 15 units of air in the syringe. Check the insulin bottle to ensure you have the correct cloudy type of insulin. With the insulin bottle held firmly on a counter or tabletop, insert the needle through the rubber cap into the bottle. Push the plunger down so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle. Remove the needle and syringe. This primes the bottle for when you withdraw the insulin later. Pull back the plunger of the syringe to the dose of the shorter acting clear insulin in this example 10 units. You now have 10 units of air in the syringe. Check the insulin bottle to ensure you have the correct clear type of insulin. With the insulin bottle held firmly on a counter or tabletop, insert the needle through the rubber cap into the bottle. Push the plunger down so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle. Turn the bottle upsid Continue reading >>

Insulins - Brand Names

Insulins - Brand Names

Sort Which types of insulin are clear? Which types are cloudy? Three CLEAR (1) rapid-acting (2) short-acting (3) long-acting Three CLOUDY (1) intermediate-acting (2) human mixture (3) analog mixture Which insulin mixtures include insulin analogs? Are they cloudy or clear? (1) insulin lispro protamine 75% / insulin lispro (Humalog Mix 75/25) (2) insulin lispro protamine 50% / insulin lispro 50% (Humalog 50/50) (3) insulin aspart protamine 70% / insulin aspart 30% (NovoLog Mix 70/30) CLOUDY Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Insulin analogs are now replacing human insulin in the US. Insulins are categorized by differences in onset, peak, duration, concentration, and route of delivery. Human Insulin and Insulin Analogs are available for insulin replacement therapy. Insulins also are classified by the timing of their action in your body – specifically, how quickly they start to act, when they have a maximal effect and how long they act.Insulin analogs have been developed because human insulins have limitations when injected under the skin. In high concentrations, such as in a vial or cartridge, human (and also animal insulin) clumps together. This clumping causes slow and unpredictable absorption from the subcutaneous tissue and a dose-dependent duration of action (i.e. the larger dose, the longer the effect or duration). In contrast, insulin analogs have a more predictable duration of action. The rapid acting insulin analogs work more quickly, and the long acting insulin analogs last longer and have a more even, “peakless” effect. Background Insulin has been available since 1925. It was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin. Characteristics of Insulin Insulins are categorized by differences in: Onset (how quickly they act) Peak (how long it takes to achieve maximum impact) Duration (how long they last before they wear off) Concentration (Insulins sold in the U.S. have a concentration of 100 units per ml or U100. In other countries, additional concentrations are available. Note: If you purchase insulin abroad, be sure it is U100.) Route of delivery (whether they a Continue reading >>

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