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Cheap Insulin At Walmart

Lilly Nabs Co-branded Insulin Deal With Walmart

Lilly Nabs Co-branded Insulin Deal With Walmart

Walmart has teamed up with a new insulin partner. Beginning in September, the retailing giant will no longer sell Novo Nordisk (NYSE: NVO) insulin under its ReliOn brand name, but instead will market Eli Lilly's (NYSE: LLY) Humulin drug under the "dual brand" Humulin ReliOn. The drug will be part of Walmart's ReliOn line of diabetes management products, including blood-glucose meters, test strips, and so on. It's already a blockbuster for Lilly, with $1 billion in 2009 sales, but it's an older insulin drug that's since been succeeded by Lilly's Humalog. That product turned in $2 billion in 2009 sales. "[A]s the nation's largest retailer, Walmart touches more consumers than any other retail organization in the country," Keith Johns, Lilly's senior director for insulins in the U.S., says in a statement. "This collaboration offers a unique opportunity to provide a low-cost therapy to large numbers of people affected by diabetes." The Walmart deal gives Lilly its first co-branded product, Reuters points out. What's unclear is just how much money the drugmaker might reap from selling Humulin through Walmart, which, after all, prides itself on low, low prices. The retailer will set the price, the Wall Street Journal reports, but hasn't done so yet. - get the Lilly release - see the story from Reuters - check out the WSJ coverage Continue reading >>

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

How To Find A Lantus Coupon

It looks like this page may be out of date. Please visit NerdWallet’s health hub for our latest content. Diabetics don’t have much of a choice when it comes to taking their insulin, and the costs can be very high, so a Lantus coupon can be invaluable. Paired with diabetic supplies like syringes and blood glucose testing equipment, diabetes is an expensive disease. But with a little bit of information and some resourcefulness, you may be able to save on your monthly prescriptions. Lantus is a long-acting insulin made by Sanofi-Aventis and prescribed to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Diabetics are unable to naturally produce or use insulin like most people, so they take injections of synthetic insulin to help regulate their blood sugar. Generic Lantus At this time, there is no generic form of Lantus available. However, that may soon change. The patents protecting Lantus from cheaper generic alternatives expired in February 2015, so less expensive forms of the drug may be coming. When this happens, opting for generic will likely be the best way to save on Lantus, and because of FDA requirements, you don’t have to worry about the generic version being less effective or less safe. Although some people avoid buying generics because they are afraid they won’t work as well as the name brands, those fears are largely unfounded. Lantus coupons from the manufacturer One carton of Lantus can cost close to $400 without insurance, according to GoodRx.com, though Lantus may very well be part of your insurance formulary. Currently, the maker of the drug offers a Lantus Savings Card. According to its website, the card can reduce your prescription cost to no more than $25. However, it also says there is a maximum benefit of $100 off each prescription for the duration of the pr Continue reading >>

Walmart, Lilly Team Up To Provide Human Insulin To People With Diabetes

Walmart, Lilly Team Up To Provide Human Insulin To People With Diabetes

Walmart, Lilly Team Up to Provide Human Insulin to People With Diabetes Walmart, Lilly Team Up to Provide Human Insulin to People With Diabetes Walmart, Lilly Team Up to Provide Human Insulin to People With Diabetes 16.5 KB INDIANAPOLIS and BENTONVILLE, Ark., June 22, 2010 /PRNewswire via COMTEX News Network/ -- Walmart (NYSE: WMT) and Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) announced today they're teaming up to provide an affordable insulin option for people with diabetes. Beginning in mid-September, Lilly's Humulin(R) brand of insulin will be available in Walmart pharmacies across the U.S. under the dual-branded name Humulin(R) ReliOn(R), including 10 mL vials of Humulin(R) R U-100, Humulin(R) N, and Humulin(R) 70/30 formulations. Nearly 24 million Americans have diabetes, up from 21 million in 2005, according to the American Diabetes Association. Of those, about a quarter (27 percent) use insulin to manage blood sugar levels.(1) "With diabetes reaching epidemic proportions in America, it's more important than ever for participants in the healthcare system to work together to provide solutions to help people successfully manage this condition," said Keith Johns, Lilly's senior director for insulins in the U.S. "At Lilly, we strive to provide innovative, cost-effective therapies that help patients manage their diabetes. And as the nation's largest retailer, Walmart touches more consumers than any other retail organization in the country. This collaboration offers a unique opportunity to provide a low-cost therapy to large numbers of people affected by diabetes." Walmart has been a leader in providing quality, low-cost healthcare products to patients, pioneering and expanding access to affordable medications. Along with Humulin(R) ReliOn(R) insulin, Walmart also offers $9 di Continue reading >>

Affordable Diabetes: Wal-mart Tops List

Affordable Diabetes: Wal-mart Tops List

I get loads of questions about where to find discounted meds and other diabetes supplies. Especially over at the DiabeticConnect community, costs are one of the hottest topics. Until now, I've been referring folks to Patient Assistance Programs, neglecting the fact that if you have a little bit of cash on hand, you can get your D-stuff for amazing prices at your local Wal-Mart. Seriously. I was pretty stunned when I walked by the Wal-Mart Pharmacy booth at the ADA Conference last week and saw the price points: Glucose Meters starting at $9 Testing Strips starting at .39 cents each (!) A ReliOn home A1c test kit for $9 And get this: a 30-day prescription for just $4, or a 90-day supply for $10, for hundreds of oral drugs, including: Metformin Glyburide Glipizide Glimepiride Lovastatin Lisinopril Levothyroxine and many more, including arthritis and pain drugs, gastrointestinal meds, asthma and infection treatments, etc., etc. Wow. There was actually new research data presented at the ADA showing that Wal-Mart and Medco Mail Order are currently the least expensive drug vendors. Some excerpts from this report: "The total monthly out-of-pocket price for all 10 drugs most commonly prescribed to diabetes patients for any indication ranged from a low of $428.35 with Medco to a high of $641.90 with Rite Aid." "Dr. Jackness and colleagues found that metformin sold for $4.00 in the generic drug discount program at Wal-Mart and Target and for $5.00 at Kmart. But the local neighborhood pharmacies averaged $38.95 and pharmacy chain Rite Aid charged $39.99." Boo on Rite Aid, I say! And even though Wal-Mart may have taken some unethical missteps with its employment practices in the past, you have to appreciate their efforts to offer some financial relief to people with diabetes. The pr Continue reading >>

Relion Insulin And Other Products At Walmart

Relion Insulin And Other Products At Walmart

Having diabetes can be very expensive, which is why the most recent announcement from Walmart will come as welcome news: In an effort to save people with diabetes up to $60 million a year, the retailer has just introduced the low-cost ReliOn Prime meter and test strips to its ReliOn family of products. The meter will cost $16.24, while the strips will cost $9 for a 50-count package, coming out to 18 cents a test. Additional ReliOn products, such as lancets, syringes, and gloves, will see price reductions, while insulin products will be offered at the price of $24.88 a bottle. “We’ve worked closely with our suppliers and found a way to significantly reduce the cost of diabetes products for all of our customers, whether they have insurance or not, so they can better manage their disease,” noted John Agwunobi, MD, president of Walmart US Health and Wellness. For more information, click here. This blog entry was written by Web Editor Diane Fennell. Continue reading >>

R Insulin - Cheap, Effective, And Unknown

R Insulin - Cheap, Effective, And Unknown

If you are injecting meal-time insulin, you're probably using one of the analog insulins: Humalog or Novolog. Your doctor probably told you these are the newest, fastest insulins, and that is true. What he probably didn't tell you because few doctors know this, is that regular human insulin (R insulin) can be a better choice for many type 2s. The reason your doctor doesn't know this has a lot to do with price. A 10 ml vial of the Regular Human insulin Novo Nordisk sells as Novolin costs about $20 at Wal-Mart. A vial of Novolog, Novo Nordisk's analog insulin, costs somewhere around $94. With that kind of price differential--the analog being almost five times the cost of the Regular--which of its two meal-time insulins do you think Novo-Nordisk is promoting to doctors? But if you think that Novolog is almost five times as expensive as Novolin because it is five times better, you're making a big mistake. The main difference between the two insulins is the speed with which they act. R insulin takes about an hour to start working and has an observable effect for 5 hours, where the Novolog starts acting within 15 minutes and is pretty much done at 3 hours. But while this means that you can inject the faster Novolog when you begin to eat rather than having to plan ahead, speed is not always a good thing when you are talking about insulin. That is because if the fast insulin gets to your blood stream faster than your food, you have the risk of going low. And if your food takes longer to digest than you expect, the fast insulin can be all done long before your food is and you'll go high. This is why a food like Pizza, which has a lot of carb but digests slowly because of its fat content, can end up producing very ugly blood sugars when you use a fast insulin--a dip at hour hour Continue reading >>

Relion/novolin 70/30

Relion/novolin 70/30

Generic Name: insulin isophane and insulin regular (IN su lin EYE soe fane and IN su lin REG ue lar) Brand Name: HumuLIN 70/30, HumuLIN 70/30 KwikPen, NovoLIN 70/30, ReliOn/NovoLIN 70/30 What is ReliOn/Novolin 70/30? Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin isophane is a intermediate-acting insulin. Insulin regular is an short-acting insulin. This combination insulin starts to work within 10 to 20 minutes after injection, peaks in 2 hours, and keeps working for up to 24 hours. ReliOn/Novolin 70/30 is a combination medicine used to improve blood sugar control in adults with diabetes mellitus. ReliOn/Novolin 70/30 may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important Information Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Before taking this medicine You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). ReliOn/Novolin 70/30 is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old. To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby. Blood sugar control is very important during pregnancy, and your dose needs may be different during each trimester of pregnancy. Your dose needs may also be different while you are breast-feeding Continue reading >>

Buying Insulin Without A Prescription: What To Know

Buying Insulin Without A Prescription: What To Know

What would you do if you found yourself in desperate need of life-saving insulin but you were uninsured or didn’t have a prescription? It’s a scary thought and a worst-case scenario—but it could happen. If you do find yourself in this situation you should know that all hope is not lost; you can purchase certain types of insulin over the counter and without a prescription, but there are many factors you should consider carefully before doing so. Things to know Before you head out the door there are a few things you should know upfront: -There are currently only two types of human insulin available over the counter and they are older versions of the medicine, which means they take longer to metabolize than the newer, prescription versions you likely are accustomed to using. -You should NOT self-administer insulin unless you have consulted with a doctor. Incorrectly administering insulin could be fatal. -No long-acting over-the-counter insulin is available at this time. So you have to find another solution if you require basal insulin. -There may be a safer or cheaper options, such as a local clinic or pharmaceutical assistance program. The versions of insulin that are available over the counter were approved for sale that way because they are based on a less concentrated, older formulation "that did not require a licensed medical practitioner's supervision for safe use," an FDA representative told NPR. The assumption is that the person buying and administering the insulin knows what to do—but this is not always the case. Today, most prescriptions cover the most up-to-date types of insulin—basal insulins such as Lantus and Levemir, as well as rapid-acting insulins like Novolog, Humalog, and Apidra. But when you buy insulin over the counter, these brand-name insul Continue reading >>

Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t The Answer To High Insulin Prices

Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t The Answer To High Insulin Prices

A diabetes advocate contrasts the performance of generic insulins versus the more popular brands. Commentary Some people don’t understand why people with diabetes get upset at the price of insulin. They see insulin for sale at a relatively reasonable price in Walmart and don’t see the problem. What they don’t know is that these Walmart insulins just don’t perform nearly as well as the more expensive insulins, and that gap in performance can have a very negative effect on the health of people with diabetes. There are three insulins available at Walmart for the price of $25 – NPH, Regular, and 70/30 (a mix of the two). NPH was first approved by the FDA in 1950, Regular was approved in 1982, 70/30 in 1989. That means NPH has been around for 66 years, Regular for 33 years, 70/30 for 27 years. Take a moment and think about what healthcare was like in 1950. Now, I’m sure someone is saying, “Well, they must still work if they are still being sold.” And they do, but they don’t work in the same way. These insulins are not interchangeable. If a person with Type 1 diabetes were to switch from a Humalog/Lantus insulin regimen to Regular and NPH, it would drastically alter their lifestyle, making blood sugar control more irregular and raising A1C scores. The biggest issue is that whereas Lantus is steady, NPH peaks. A person using NPH must keep a very set dietary schedule, making sure to eat meals and snacks at certain times to correspond with peak times of an insulin dose. The strict schedule is difficult for everyone, but especially for children. They are unable to alter their daily schedules and must always be sure to eat at specific times. Even if they’re not hungry, they must eat to avoid low blood sugar. And if they are hungry, they often cannot have more t Continue reading >>

Relion Insulin: Everything You Need To Know

Relion Insulin: Everything You Need To Know

For my patients who have no insurance, ReliOn products at Walmart are a lifesaver. In North Carolina, we never funded Medicaid expansion. Some people could receive Obamacare through the federal marketplace, but others were left in the gap where it was too costly for them. The tax penalty was less, so they took the penalty instead of buying coverage. For those with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in the no insurance gap, for those in the “Medicare donut hole,” and for those in disaster situations, ReliOn insulin is available at a very affordable cost. If you want insulin at a cheaper cost, it is important to be aware of some of the differences between ReliOn insulin and name brand insulins. Renee’s story Renee had Type 1 Diabetes, and couldn’t afford her insurance coverage here in North Carolina. After running her insurance cost numbers on the Federal Marketplace, she would have to pay $300 per month for catastrophic coverage that wouldn’t even cover her diabetes medications. Her husband had lost his job, and she worked at a grocery store, where she didn’t make a living wage, or have any insurance benefits. She came in crying. She needed help, because she had lost her insurance coverage, and she was about to run out of her insulin. She was afraid of what might happen to her, and what might happen to her little boy, if she ran out of her insulin. We referred her to a social worker who could help her with needed resources, and see if she could qualify for Medicaid, or start social security disability determination so she could get insurance when determined disabled. In the meantime, we spoke with her doctor, and he gave us conversion doses for Renee to switch to the ReliOn brand of insulins at Walmart. She had to take a combination of ReliOn Humulin N injections twi Continue reading >>

Why Treating Diabetes Keeps Getting More Expensive

Why Treating Diabetes Keeps Getting More Expensive

Laura Marston is one of the 1.25 million Americans who suffer from Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder in which a person's pancreas can't make insulin. She hoards vials of the life-saving medicine in her refrigerator to protect herself from the drug's rising prices. (Jorge Ribas/The Washington Post) At first, the researchers who discovered insulin agonized about whether to patent the drug at all. It was 1921, and the team of biochemists and physicians based in Toronto was troubled by the idea of profiting from a medicine that had such widespread human value, one that could transform diabetes from a death sentence into a manageable disease. Ultimately, they decided to file for a patent — and promptly sold it to the University of Toronto for $3, or $1 for each person listed. It was the best way, they believed, to ensure that no company would have a monopoly and patients would have affordable access to a safe, effective drug. “Above all, these were discoverers who were trying to do a great humanitarian thing,” said historian Michael Bliss, “and they hoped their discovery was a kind of gift to humanity.” But the drug also has become a gift to the pharmaceutical industry. A version of insulin that carried a list price of $17 a vial in 1997 is priced at $138 today. Another that launched two decades ago with a sticker price of $21 a vial has been increased to $255. [This 90-year-old fight over insulin royalties reveals just how much has changed in medicine] Seventy-five years after the original insulin patent expired — a point at which drug prices usually decline — three companies have made incremental improvements to insulin that generate new patents and profits, creating a family of modern insulins worth billions of dollars. The history of insulin captures Continue reading >>

Eli Lilly And Walmart To Provide Affordable Insulin

Eli Lilly And Walmart To Provide Affordable Insulin

Eli Lilly and Company announced they’re teaming up with Walmart to provide an affordable insulin option for people with diabetes. Beginning in mid-September, Lilly’s Humulin(R) brand of insulin will be available in Walmart pharmacies across the U.S. under the dual-branded name Humulin(R) ReliOn(R), including 10 mL vials of Humulin(R) R U-100, Humulin(R) N, and Humulin(R) 70/30 formulations. Humulin, the world’s first synthetic human insulin, was introduced by Lilly in 1982. Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

Low Cost Insulin Available Through Major Retailer

Low Cost Insulin Available Through Major Retailer

On August 31, Wal-Mart announced that people with diabetes will have a new, low-cost option for insulin. In partnership with Novo Nordisk, Wal-Mart has introduced Novolin human insulin to Wal-Mart’s ReliOn brand of diabetes healthcare products. Available for $16.94 per vial, Novolin is the latest addition to Wal-Mart’s growing ReliOn brand of healthcare products, which include ReliOn insulin syringes, glucose tablets, blood pressure monitors and lancets. “We believe that this alliance will help the millions of Americans who are managing their diabetes to have easier, affordable access to this life-saving drug,” said Martin Soeters, president of Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Under the ReliOn brand, Novolin will be offered in three human insulin formulations: Novolin R (Regular), Novolin N (NPH) and Novolin 70/30 (70 percent NPH, 30 percent Regular). Wal-Mart advises consumers to consult with their physician before making any changes in insulin therapy. Novolin is available in all of Wal-Mart’s 2,600 stores as well as 466 SAM’S Club pharmacies. For further information, visit Novo Nordisk on the World Wide Web at novo-nordisk.com. I think that it’s safe to say that none of us were happy when we first found out that we had diabetes. The words “you’re a diabetic” or “you have diabetes” can sound like a death sentence and while we … Dear Nadia, Is marijuana used to lower high blood sugar? if so, does this mean I have to refrain from the munchies to get the benefits? Leah Dear Leah: The new Marijuana industry is still at its infancy in terms … Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

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