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Changing Lantus Injection Time

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Dosage Forms & Strengths injectable solution 100 units/mL (Lantus; 10mL vial) 100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SolosStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Type 1 or 2 Diabetes Mellitus Lantus and Toujeo are recombinant human insulin analogs indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus Dosing Considerations Indicated for once-daily SC administration; exhibits relatively constant glucose-lowering profile over 24 hr May be administered at any time during the day; should be administered SC once daily at the same time every day Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used in regimens with short-acting insulin Should not be administered IV or via an insulin pump; IV administration of the usual SC dose could result in severe hypoglycemia As with all insulins, injection sites should be rotated within the same region (abdomen, thigh, or deltoid) from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy; no clinically relevant difference in insulin glargine absorption after abdominal, deltoid, or thigh SC administration As with all insulins, the rate of absorption and, consequently, the onset and duration of action may be affected by exercise and other variables (eg, stress, intercurrent illness, changes in coadministered drugs, meal patterns) Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Starting dose sho Continue reading >>

So You’re Ready

So You’re Ready

Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get emergency help if you have: Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together w Continue reading >>

Time Zones |

Time Zones |

Travel increases the risk of hypoglycemia, especially if many time zones are crossed. Long-haul travel can also cause dehydration which can increase the potential for high blood sugar levels and possibly diabetic ketoacidosis. Here we provide guidelines for insulin users to discuss with their diabetes team. These are simple rules for individuals planning to travel across 5 or more time zones and who are using once or twice a day long-acting background (basal) insulin. As explained below, the adjustments you make will depend on the direction of travel. The day before departure, give the usual dose at the usual time of day When you begin traveling, keep your watch set to your departure time zone and give half of the normal dose at the usual time After giving this half dose, change your watch to the destination time (you can find this out from the flight attendant or from the world clock on your smartphone) According to your destination time zone, give the remaining half of the long-acting (basal) insulin at the same hour you are accustomed to giving insulin (e.g. if you usually take insulin at 8pm in Los Angeles, take your insulin at 8pm according to your new time zone) The next day keep to the destination time and give the usual full dosage at the usual time The day before departure, give the usual dose at the usual time of day Keep to the departure time and give a reduced dose at the usual time, the dose should be reduced by using the following formula Travel dose = usual dose x (0.9 number of time zones you are crossing by 24). As seen in the following example, dont forget to divide the number of time zones by 24 before subtracting that number from 0.9. After giving this reduced dose, change your watch to the destination time zone According to your destination time zo Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Not Only For Bedtime?

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Not Only For Bedtime?

Physicians are pursuing several different possibilities of dosing that deviate from the FDA-approved instructions for Lantus dosing. Lantus is approved only for bedtime dosing. That’s because the pre-approval studies were conducted only using bedtime dosing, therefore the FDA approved the drug that way. But from experience, patients can also use Lantus in the morning. Lantus is a “peakless” insulin…giving steady concentrations throughout the day. But for some patients, it doesn’t last the full 24 hours. Morning dosing might be preferred for these patients. That way, Lantus wears off at night when insulin requirements are lower. Some patients use BID dosing if Lantus doesn’t last all day. Explain that the big advantage to Lantus is once daily dosing. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a recombinant human insulin analog with a duration of action up to 24 hours.1 The microprecipitates that are formed in the subcutaneous tissue after injection slow the absorption of Lantus and provide a relatively constant level of insulin over 24 hours without a pronounced peak.1 This prolonged effect over 24 hours enables it to be administered once daily. Lantus is FDA approved for once-daily subcutaneous administration at bedtime for adults and children six years of age and older with type 1 diabetes mellitus or adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who require basal (long-acting) insulin for the control of hyperglycemia.1 When changing a patient (child >6 years or adult) from intermediate- or long-acting insulin to Lantus, the amount of short-acting insulin or oral antidiabetic agent may need to be adjusted. In premarketing studies, for patients using once-daily NPH or Ultralente insulin, the initial dose of Lantus was not changed. For patients using twice-daily NPH insulin, the in Continue reading >>

How Do I Adjust For Time Changes When Taking My Lantus?

How Do I Adjust For Time Changes When Taking My Lantus?

How do I adjust for time changes when taking my Lantus? How do I adjust for time changes when taking my Lantus? When to take my Lantus while on a 10 day trip to Ireland? I normally take it at 7:30 AM Minnesota time. I take 24 Units. When its 7:30 AM in Minnesota it will be 12:30 AM in Dublin.. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control The first day you could do a split does, then after your there go back to your regular dosing. Lantus is a basal or long term insulin and last about 24 hrs but falls off sooner than then. D.D. Family Metabolic Syndrome (T2) since 2003 Alternatively -- as you are taking a single dose -- you might just gradually time-shift it over several days (same as your body will take a few days to adjust) you could move the dose an hour or two each day until it is back on schedule and reverse the process when you fly home. Enjoy the trip! 52, Metabolic Syndrome (Type 2) Diagnosed March 2003 - MDI then Pump(ed) 5+ years Real whole food diet, including natural fats; avoiding starches, grains and most fruit -- physically active -- Levemir 6u each night D.D. Family T1 since 1977 - using Novolog in an Animas pump. Trying to compensate for time changes is just too complicated for me. When travelling, I continue to have my shots at the same time on my watch, and with the same dosages. I just test more often and take corrective action if necessary when crossing time zones. Isn't Dublin 6 hours ahead of Minnesota? At 7:30 AM in Minnesota it's 1:30 PM in Dublin. I personally for just those ten days would take my basal at 1:30 PM Dublin time. I would take my normal morning injection at home at 7:30 the day I left. When I get to Ireland I then take my next basal injection at 1:30 PM local time which will be 24 hours after my last injection. No split dosing or tim Continue reading >>

Switching From Am To Pm - Lantus

Switching From Am To Pm - Lantus

I've been using Lantus for about 9 years now. I've always injected in the AM. It's easier for me to remember and it's become habit. I've always had higher fasting #'s in the AM. During the day, I am fine. But mornings, I rarely see anything below 150. I've tried to switch from morning to night time before, but for whatever reason, I was unable to do it. I'm trying to switch it now to see if it will improve my fasting #'s. How would you suggest I do that? I mean, I can't give myself my regular does in the AM, then the regular dose at night.. And I can't skip a whole day and wait till the PM to dose either. Confused. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy Splitting the dose is my suggestion. Although a T2, I have been on basal/bolus MDI since diagnosis in 2005. I find I have better coverage and have never gone back to just a single dose either in the AM or PM. Let us know what you decide to do and how it works for you. I did a little above half this AM. I normally take 96 u. I was going to do 50 in the AM and 46 in PM. I am already seeing higher #s. But not too bad. My numbers are not perfect to begin with, but I hover at about 95-120 premeal. Today, I've been about 140. Ill do the PM and see what my morning looks like. Thanks! Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy It could take a few days for your system to settle in to the split dose. At one time I was taking 95 units of Lantus and found that I did not absorb or use it well. Took about a week for me to see a steady (ish) set of numbers. Oh! I'm hoping that is my problem and I could start using less Lantus.That would be a big plus for me! D.D. Family T2 1986, insulin 2000, Double 08, Omnipod 6/12 could you skip the morning lantus and use Hum Continue reading >>

How To Use The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

How To Use The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Please check the leaflet for the insulin for complete instructions on how to store SoloSTAR®. If your SoloSTAR® is in cool storage, take it out 1 to 2 hours before you inject to allow it to warm up. Cold insulin is more painful to inject. Keep SoloSTAR® out of the reach and sight of children. Keep your SoloSTAR® in cool storage (36°F–46°F [2°C–8°C]) until first use. Do not allow it to freeze. Do not put it next to the freezer compartment of your refrigerator, or next to a freezer pack. Once you take your SoloSTAR® out of cool storage, for use or as a spare, you can use it for up to 28 days. During this time it can be safely kept at room temperature up to 86°F (30°C). Do not use it after this time. SoloSTAR® in use must not be stored in a refrigerator. Do not use SoloSTAR® after the expiration date printed on the label of the pen or on the carton. Protect SoloSTAR® from light. Discard your used SoloSTAR® as required by your local authorities. Protect your SoloSTAR® from dust and dirt. You can clean the outside of your SoloSTAR® by wiping it with a damp cloth. Do not soak, wash, or lubricate the pen as this may damage it. Your SoloSTAR® is designed to work accurately and safely. It should be handled with care. Avoid situations where SoloSTAR® might be damaged. If you are concerned that your SoloSTAR® may be damaged, use a new one. Continue reading >>

Adjusting Lantus (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml Dose

Adjusting Lantus (insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml Dose

* This offer is not valid for prescriptions covered by or submitted for reimbursement under Medicare, Medicaid, VA, DOD, TRICARE, or similar federal or state programs, including any state pharmaceutical programs. The Federal Employee Health Benefits (FEHB) Program is not a federal or state government health care program for purposes of the savings program. Void where prohibited by law. For the duration of the program, the Savings Card carries maximum savings up to: $500 per pack for all patients who are enrolled in a commercial insurance plan, regardless of formulary status $200 per pack of Toujeo for patients not enrolled in a commercial insurance plan $100 per pack of Lantus for patients not enrolled in a commercial insurance plan This offer is valid for up to 3 packs per prescription. Savings may vary depending on patients out-of-pocket costs. Upon registration, patients receive all program details. Sanofi US reserves the right to change the maximum cap amount, rescind, revoke, or amend the program without notice. 1Januvia is a registered trademark of Merck & Co., Inc. 2Onglyza and 10Bydureon are registered trademarks of the AstraZeneca group of companies. 3Actos is a registered trademark of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd. 4Levemir, 5Tresiba, 6Novolog, and 8Victoza are registered trademarks of Novo Nordisk A/S. 7Humalog and 9Trulicity are registered trademarks of Eli Lilly and Company. 11Tanzeum is a registered trademark of GlaxoSmithKline. a"Certified Diabetes Educator and CDE are certification marks owned and registered by the National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE). NCBDE is not affiliated in any way with Sanofi US (or your official designation). NCBDE does not sponsor or endorse any diabetes-related products or services. This site is inte Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information For Soliqua® 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

Important Safety Information For Soliqua® 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

What is the most important information I should know about SOLIQUA 100/33? Do not share your SOLIQUA 100/33 pen with other people, even if the needle has been changed. SOLIQUA 100/33 can cause serious side effects, including inflammation of the pancreas, which may be life-threatening. Before using SOLIQUA 100/33, tell your doctor if you have had pancreatitis, stones in your gallbladder, or a history of alcoholism. These medical problems may make you more likely to get pancreatitis. Stop taking SOLIQUA 100/33 and call your healthcare provider right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe, and will not go away. The pain may be felt in the back area. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. Who should not use SOLIQUA 100/33? Do not use SOLIQUA 100/33 if you are having an episode of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine, lixisenatide, or any of the ingredients in SOLIQUA 100/33. Tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you: have or have had problems with your pancreas, your kidneys, or your liver, stones in your gallbladder, or a history of alcoholism. have heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs (thiazolidinediones). have severe problems with your stomach, such as slowed emptying of your stomach or problems digesting food. are pregnant or breastfeeding or plan to become pregnant or to breastfeed. It is not known if SOLIQUA 100/33 will harm your unborn baby or pass into your breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including all prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. SOLIQUA 100/33 may affect the way some medicines work. Before using SOLIQUA 100/33 Continue reading >>

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

A Large Difference In Dose Timing Of Basal Insulin Introduces Risk Of Hypoglycemia And Overweight: A Cross-sectional Study

A Large Difference In Dose Timing Of Basal Insulin Introduces Risk Of Hypoglycemia And Overweight: A Cross-sectional Study

Go to: Abstract Basal insulin should be injected at the same time each day, but people with diabetes sometimes mistime their injections. It is not known whether irregular daily dose timing affects diabetes-related factors. We report here our evaluation of the effects of deviations from a regular dosing schedule on glycemic control and hypoglycemia on patients treated with long-acting insulin (insulin glargine U100). We also consider the effects of ultra-long-acting insulin (insulin degludec) in this context. Methods Nineteen individuals with type 1 diabetes and 58 with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Demographic data on all participants were retrieved from their medical records. Variation in dose timing was determined as the difference between the time of the earliest mistimed dose and the time of the latest mistimed dose, for each participant, over a 2-week period. All participants completed the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities questionnaire, Problem Areas in Diabetes scale and 5-Item World Health Organization Well-being Index. Glargine U100 was switched to degludec in those individuals with type 2 diabetes who achieved inadequate glycemic control or suffered from frequent hypoglycemic episodes or who required two injections per day, and changes in hemoglobin A1c level and frequency of hypoglycemic episodes during the 12-week period were compared. A greater difference in dose timing was related to a higher frequency of hypoglycemic episodes and overweight in persons with type 2 diabetes. Smoking, drinking and living alone were independently associated with a greater difference in dose timing. Insulin degludec decreased the frequency of hypoglycemia and improved glycemic control in participants whose dose mistiming was >120 min. Fixed dose timing should be employ Continue reading >>

Lantus Dosage

Lantus Dosage

Important Administration Instructions Administer LANTUS subcutaneously once daily at any time of day but at the same time every day. Prior to initiation of LANTUS, train patients on proper use and injection technique. Patient should follow the Instructions for Use to correctly administer LANTUS. Administer LANTUS subcutaneously into the abdominal area, thigh, or deltoid, and rotate injection sites within the same region from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Visually inspect LANTUS vials and SoloStar prefilled pens for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration. Only use if the solution is clear and colorless with no visible particles. Do not administer intravenously or via an insulin pump. Do not dilute or mix LANTUS with any other insulin or solution. General Dosing Instructions Individualize and adjust the dosage of LANTUS based on the individual's metabolic needs, blood glucose monitoring results and glycemic control goal. Dosage adjustments may be needed with changes in physical activity, changes in meal patterns (i.e., macronutrient content or timing of food intake), during acute illness, or changes in renal or hepatic function. Dosage adjustments should only be made under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring [see Warnings and Precautions (5.2)]. Initiation of LANTUS Therapy In patients with type 1 diabetes, LANTUS must be used concomitantly with short-acting insulin.The recommended starting dose of LANTUS in patients with type 1 diabetes should be approximately one-third of the total daily insulin requirements. Short-acting, premeal insulin should be used to satisfy the remainder of the daily insulin requirements. Changing to LANTUS from Other Insulin Therapies If chan Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Lantus In The Morning Instead Of Evening

Lantus In The Morning Instead Of Evening

I recently read on here somewhere that Lantus is usually given at bedtime because it lasts 18-24 hours and that by the time it is dwindling the dinner injection is given kind of as the bridge between the first Lantus injection and the next one the following evening. Thus making a steady regimen. However I quite frequently fail to give myself injections at dinner. I am just careless sometimes. But my Lantus peaks around 3 or 4 every morning, and depending on the night before I may experience a mild/mildly severe low. Has it ever been suggested to take Lantus in the AM? My thought is this: If I took Lantus in the A.M. (Aprox 6:30 or so) my peak would be about 5 or 6 hours later. This would be my lunch time. I could use a sliding scale determined at lunch. If I forgot the dinner shot, the Lantus would still be working. And I could still test at bedtime and bolus if needed. I see it this way because at least then I would have some insulin in my system at dinner, rather than the tiny amount of Lantus left, there would be a bit more (since I would be taking it about 8 & 1/2 hours later). Anyone have any suggestions or comments tomy thoughts? Continue reading >>

How To Change Lantus Injection Time(s)

How To Change Lantus Injection Time(s)

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I currently take 28u Lantus in the morning. MY FBGs have been averaging around 150, and my regular doctor thinks I should switch over to taking it in the evening. His new theory (based on a recent seminar he attended) is that your FBS make up 75% of your A1C (my latest is 7.9, which is up from the low 7s where it usually is). Therefore, the more important thing to do is get your FBG under control with the long acting insulin, and then use rapid (in my case, Humalog) as you would normally with meals and so on. This is the first I've heard the 75% thing, and it doesn't sound right to me, but this is what they preached at the seminar. So, he thinks I should switch to the evening, which makes sense regardless of the 75% thing. If I want to switch to evenings (with dinner), how do I go about it? Or should I do a split? (prefer not to) I think this number reflects the fact that bolus ratios, coverage of meals, is fairly easy to achieve - diet, exercise, med doage and timing. Basal rates can be much tougher, and their impact is not short term like bolusing, it has a 24 hour effect. FBG is used because it is the test most untainted by bolusing. I agree that if this number is correct, it's a good indicator your basals are at least close. I agree with their % rate for most diabetics. Flatliners are fairly easy to get right; they have few and minor fluctuations. However, add a big DP and it lowers the % rate as this adds a big spike not necessarily covered by the lantus or bolus, at least not well understood control. Usually it's built into the am bolus, but that forces the person to eat the same meal e Continue reading >>

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