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Chances Of Getting Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes

Time To Think About Preventing Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes?

Time To Think About Preventing Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes?

You may have risk factors which contributed to you being diagnosed with gestational diabetes which may also make you higher risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. But even if you didn't have ANY risk factors for gestational diabetes, you still need to think about preventing Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes, as having gestational diabetes itself is a risk factor for Type 2. Having gestational diabetes gives you a seven-fold increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It also gives your baby a six-fold increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and obesity later in life, meaning it is best to not only think of your own diet and lifestyle choices, but also your family's. Risk of developing Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes for the mother Gestational diabetes increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy. Statistics from Diabetes UK state that there is a seven-fold increased risk in women with gestational diabetes developing type 2 diabetes in later life. NICE state that up to 50% of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years of the birth. and a meta-analysis published in March 2014 state: In a systematic review conducted in 2009, body fat measures had the most consistent associations with diabetes risk compared with other types of factors including age, parity and family history of diabetes. Specifically, pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with significantly increased risk of future diabetes after a gestational diabetes delivery; for every 1 kg increase in pre-pregnancy weight, there was a 40% increase in odds of developing Type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.20–1.60). Intra-partum and post-partum weight measures were also associated with increased diabetes risk A 2002 publication fro Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes: The Influence Of Changing Diagnostic Criteria

Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes: The Influence Of Changing Diagnostic Criteria

Go to: INTRODUCTION Background Gestational diabetes (GDM) has long been recognised clinically. First described in pregnancy in 1824 in Germany[1], Joslin[2] described in 1916 a case of diabetes which presented in pregnancy, resolved with delivery, and recurred later in life. In the 1940s and 1950s, Hoet et al[3] recognised the association of this type of diabetes with adverse perinatal outcome, and characterised the relationship between glucose tolerance during pregnancy, and in the post-partum period. However, despite the long-recognised association, no standardised criteria for diagnosis were devised until 1964. In Boston City Hospital, O’Sullivan et al[4] carried out 3-h 100 g oral glucose tolerance tests on 752 patients at different stages of pregnancy. Women with 2 out of 4 values that were greater than 2 standard deviations (rounded to the nearest 5 mg/dL) above the mean glucose levels determined in this cohort were classified as having GDM. These criteria (with some modification) have continued in clinical use over the following four decades. Evolution of diagnostic criteria for GDM The major feature of these criteria was that they defined a cohort of women with a greatly increased future risk of progression to type 2 diabetes, demonstrating a lifetime risk of up to 60%[5]. The National Diabetes Data Group (NDDG) criteria, proposed in 1979[6] (Table 1), converted the O’Sullivan/Mahan criteria from whole blood to plasma values (see Figure 1 for timeline). The Carpenter-Coustan criteria[7], proposed in 1982, also converted the O’Sullivan/Mahan criteria to plasma values, but in addition, took a change in enzymatic methods into account. They soon entered widespread clinical use, and were subsequently validated for prediction of adverse perinatal outcome[8-12]. Continue reading >>

Metformin Prevents Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes

Metformin Prevents Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes

Metformin Prevents Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes Both lifestyle intervention and use of the drug metformin reduced the risk for type 2 diabetes among women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a 10-year study. But metformin failed to affect diabetes risk among those without a history of GDM, according to this new analysis of the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS), published online February 23 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism by Vanita R Aroda, MD, from MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, Maryland, and colleagues. "This is probably the longest-term look at progression to [type 2] diabetes for women with a history of gestational diabetes," Dr Aroda told Medscape Medical News. The results confirm that pregnancy operates like a "stress test for the body," signaling a high probability of progression to diabetes, she said. "It's important to assess whether a woman had gestational diabetes. People tend to forget about it after the baby is delivered, but long after the baby is delivered the risk is quite high, and this study shows one can do something about it." Indeed, says coauthor William Herman, MD, MPH, from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, "This really emphasizes in my mind that metformin is a viable alternative to lifestyle intervention among women with a history of gestational diabetes." Women With Gestational Diabetes at Higher Risk for Type 2 Diabetes The women studied were part of the DPPOS, which is a long-term follow-up of the 3-year Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which randomized overweight or obese people at high risk for type 2 diabetes to intensive lifestyle change that included a goal of 7% weight loss and 150 minutes or more per week of moderate-intensity physical exe Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes 10 Years After The Index Pregnancy In Sri Lankan Womena Community Based Retrospective Cohort Study

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes 10 Years After The Index Pregnancy In Sri Lankan Womena Community Based Retrospective Cohort Study

Gestational diabetes mellitus and risk of type 2 diabetes 10 years after the index pregnancy in Sri Lankan womenA community based retrospective cohort study 1Department of Nutrition, Medical Research Institute, Colombo, Sri Lanka 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Ragama, Sri Lanka 3Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kelaniya, Ragama, Sri Lanka Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. Received 2017 Jan 5; Accepted 2017 Jun 1. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) later in life compared to women with no GDM. This study was aimed to determine the risk of developing T2DM 10 years after GDM in Sri Lankan women. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Colombo district, Sri Lanka. 7205 women who delivered a child in 2005 were identified through Public Health Midwives in the field. Women with antenatal records were interviewed and relevant data were extracted from medical records to identify potential participants. One hundred and nineteen women who had GDM and 240 women who did not have GDM were recruited. Current diagnosis of diabetes was based on history, relevant medical records and blood reports within the past 1 year. The mean duration of follow up was 10.9 (SD = 0.35) years in the GDM group and 10.8 (SD = 0.31) years in the non-GDM group. The incidence density of diabetes in the GDM group was 56.3 per 1000 person years compared Continue reading >>

Will Gestational Diabetes Affect Us After Birth?

Will Gestational Diabetes Affect Us After Birth?

Will Gestational Diabetes Affect My Baby? Your baby will probably be healthy, if you and your doctor manage your blood sugar while you have gestational diabetes. Right after you give birth, doctors will check your newborn's blood sugar level. If its low, she may need to get glucose through an IV until it comes back up to normal. Gestational diabetes raises the chance that you will have a baby who is larger than normal. It's also linked to jaundice , in which the skin looks yellowish. Jaundice generally fades quickly with treatment. Although your child will be more likely than other kids to develop type 2 diabetes later on, a healthy lifestyle (including a good diet and lots of physical activity ) can cut that risk. Because you had gestational diabetes , you have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes . But it wont definitely happen, and you can take action to prevent that. Your blood sugar levels will likely return to normal about 6 weeks after childbirth . (Your doctor will check on that.) If it does, you should get follow-up tests every 3 years. Try to keep your weight in a healthy range. Not sure what that is? Ask your doctor. Eat a good diet that includes lots of vegetables, whole grains , fruits, and lean protein . If you plan to have another baby , keep in mind that you are more likely to get gestational diabetes again. Ask your doctor if there are any lifestyle changes that would help you avoid that. WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson, MD on April 19, 2017 American Diabetes Association: "Gestational Diabetes and What is Gestational Diabetes? Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Gestational Diabetes: A Guide for Pregnant Women." American College of Nurse Midwives: "Gestational Diabetes." National Diabetes Education Program: Did Y Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Your tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the lives of those with diabetes. Nearly 30 million battle diabetes and every 23 seconds someone new is diagnosed. Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Your gift today will help us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Gestational diabetes ( GDM ), or diabetes during pregnancy, is when women have diabetes during pregnancy. They've never had diabetes before, and it goes away after pregnancy. But, unfortunately, that's not the end of the story. Once you've had GDM your chances are 2 in 3 that it will return in future pregnancies. And women who have had GDM are more than 7 times as likely to develop type 2 diabetes as women who didn't have diabetes in pregnancy. There aremany other health conditions that raise your risk, including: Lose weight. Are you more than 20% over your ideal body weight? Losing even a few pounds can help you prevent type 2 diabetes. Make healthy food choices. Follow simple daily guidelines, like eating enough fresh vegetables and fruits, and whole grains. Limit fat to 30% or less of your daily calories, and watch your portion sizes. Healthy eating habits can go a long way in preventing diabetes and other health problems. Stay active. Regular exercise can help prevent type 2 diabetes. Plus it can help you lose weight , manage stress , and feel better. Learn more about physical activity Breastfeed. If you can, breastfeed your baby. Breastfeeding can provide both short- and long-term benefits to both your baby and to you. Talk to your doctor. Be sure to tell your health care providers that you've had GDM. Get tested. If you had GDM, you should be Continue reading >>

The Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Type 2

The Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Type 2

If you developed gestational diabetes mellitus (pregnancy-related diabetes) during your pregnancy, then you already know what you need to do to prevent type 2 diabetes: Watch what you eat, stay on top of your blood sugar levels, and get appropriate exercise. “Outcomes for gestational diabetes have improved dramatically because women are very motivated during pregnancy. We just wish they would stay that way after the birth,” says Vivian Fonseca, MD, professor of medicine and pharmacology and chief of the section of endocrinology at Tulane University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans. Gestational Diabetes: What Is It? Gestational diabetes — elevated blood sugar during pregnancy — occurs in pregnant women who have not had diabetes prior to the pregnancy. Doctors do not know what causes gestational diabetes, but they have some theories. Insulin, made by the pancreas, helps regulate the blood sugar levels in the body. When a woman is pregnant, the placenta, which nourishes the baby, also makes hormones that block the mother’s insulin. That makes it tough for the insulin to convert the blood sugar into energy. If the sugar can’t be converted into energy, that sugar gets stored in the blood. And that is the start of gestational diabetes. These high blood sugar levels can cause complications with the pregnancy and put the baby at risk. When a woman is diagnosed, she and her doctor will work hard, focusing on diet, exercise, and weight management, to maintain normal blood sugar levels. Gestational Diabetes: Who’s at Risk? “Weight certainly plays a role, and it’s also genetically determined,” explains Dr. Fonseca. If you are overweight, you have a close relative who had gestational diabetes, or you had gestational diabetes with a previous pregnancy, you ar Continue reading >>

Risk Of Development Of Diabetes Mellitus After Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes

Risk Of Development Of Diabetes Mellitus After Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes

Risk of development of diabetes mellitus after diagnosis of gestational diabetes This article has been corrected. See CMAJ. 2008 August 12; 179(4): 344 . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. It is generally appreciated that gestational diabetes is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, the precise relation between these 2 conditions remains unknown. We sought to determine the incidence of diabetes mellitus after diagnosis of gestational diabetes. We used a population-based database to identify all deliveries in the province of Ontario over the 7-year period from Apr. 1, 1995, to Mar. 31, 2002. We linked these births to mothers who had been given a diagnosis of gestational diabetes through another administrative database that records people with diabetes on the basis of either physician service claims or hospital admission records. We examined database records for these women from the time of delivery until Mar. 31, 2004, a total of 9 years. We determined the presence of diabetes mellitus according to a validated administrative database definition for this condition. We identified 659 164 pregnant women who had no pre-existing diabetes. Of these, 21 823 women (3.3%) had a diagnosis of gestational diabetes. The incidence of gestational diabetes rose significantly over the 9-year study period, from 3.2% in 1995 to 3.6% in 2001 (p < 0.001). The probability of diabetes developing after gestational diabetes was 3.7% at 9 months after delivery and 18.9% at 9 years after delivery. After adjustment for age, urban or rural residence, neighbourhood income quintile, whether the woman had a previous pregnancy, whether the woman had hypertension after the index delivery, and primary care level before the index delivery, the most significant risk factor for diab Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Up To Half Of Gestational Diabetes Patients Will Develop Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

Up To Half Of Gestational Diabetes Patients Will Develop Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Up to half of gestational diabetes patients will develop type 2 diabetes, study finds Women who were diagnosed with gestational diabetes during pregnancy face a significantly higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in the future, according to a recent study. Women who were diagnosed with gestational diabetes during pregnancy face a significantly higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in the future, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). The prospective cohort study tracked 843 women who were diagnosed with gestational diabetes between 1996 and 2003 at Cheil General Hospital in Seoul, South Korea. About 12.5 percent of the women developed Type 2 diabetes within two months of delivering their babies. During the next decade, the number of women diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes continued to grow at a rate of 6.8 percent a year. "The findings indicate as many as half of Asian women who had gestational diabetes will develop Type 2 diabetes within eight years of giving birth," said the study's lead author, Soo Heon Kwak, MD, of Seoul National University Hospital. The study is among the largest of its kind to study Asian women who had gestational diabetes. Researchers followed 370 participants for more than a year after the birth of their children. Of the remaining women studied, 105 were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within two months of giving birth and the remainder did not participate in long-term follow-up visits. Researchers identified two distinct groups of women who were at risk -- those who developed Type 2 diabetes within two months of giving birth and those who took a year or more to progres Continue reading >>

Longer Term Implications Of Gestational Diabetes

Longer Term Implications Of Gestational Diabetes

If you become pregnant again If you become pregnant again, you are at higher risk of having gestational diabetes again. For this reason, talk to your doctor when you are planning your next pregnancy. You should be screened for diabetes before becoming pregnant again to make sure that your blood glucose is at a safe level, and as soon as you become pregnant you will need to monitor your blood glucose levels. "The second time round I didn’t eat chocolate, and getting out and walking was easier because I had a child. Worrying about it added a lot of anxiety to my pregnancy but I didn’t have gestational diabetes that time round." Prisha, mum of two Increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes You are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in later life. This risk is highest in the four-to-five years after your gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, which, if left untreated, can lead to sight loss, foot numbness and heart disease, as well as the risks associated with having a hypo. But there is a lot you can do to reduce these risks. Gestational diabetes is a warning sign to show what could develop in later life if you don’t take action. Have a chat with your GP about what you can do to reduce your risk. It is also worth knowing the warning signs (shown below). Visit your GP if you are worried at all. Signs of diabetes Feeling more thirsty than usual Needing to wee more often – especially at night Frequent thrush infections Weight loss Slow-healing wounds Feeling unusually tired Blurred vision There is lots you can do to reduce your risk, by making changes to your lifestyle. Even if you develop type 2 diabetes, you may find you can manage it through diet and exercise. So, whichever way you look at it, these changes can make all the differ Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and eye and foot problems. Prediabetes also can cause health problems. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems, so delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health. You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being physically active most days of the week. Ask your doctor if you should take the diabetes drug metformin to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.1 How can I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows that you can do a lot to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Here are some things you can change to lower your risk: Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds. Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly to build up to your goal. Eat healthy foods most of the time. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Your Health After Your Baby Is Born

Gestational Diabetes And Your Health After Your Baby Is Born

Your healthcare provider will check your blood sugar level after you deliver. For most women, blood sugar levels go back to normal quickly after having their babies. Six to twelve weeks after your baby is born, you should have a blood test to find out whether your blood sugar level is back to normal. Based on the results of the test, you will fall into one of three categories. After Pregnancy Test Categories If your category is… You should… Normal Get checked for diabetes every three years Impaired Glucose Tolerance or Pre-iabetes Get checked for diabetes every year Talk to your healthcare provider about ways to lower your risk level for diabetes Diabetes Work with your healthcare provider to set up a treatment plan for your diabetes The test also checks your risk for getting diabetes in the future. Women who have had gestational diabetes have a 40 percent higher chance than women who have not had gestational diabetes of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. Getting checked for diabetes is important because type 2 diabetes shows few symptoms. The only way to know for sure that you have type 2 diabetes is to have a blood test that reveals a higher-than-normal blood sugar level. You should also tell your healthcare provider right away if you notice any of these things: Increased thirsty Urinating often Feeling constantly or overly tired Losing weight quickly and/or without reason Having one or more of these symptoms does not mean you have diabetes, but your healthcare provider might want to test you to make sure. Finding type 2 diabetes early can help you avoid problems, like early heart disease and damage to your eyes, kidneys, or nerves. If you choose to use birth control methods in the future, talk with your health care provider about a method that won’t incr Continue reading >>

In Women With Gestational Diabetes, Exercise Lowers Type 2 Diabetes Risk

In Women With Gestational Diabetes, Exercise Lowers Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Women who have gestational diabetes — a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually ends after the baby's delivery — can lower their risk of later developing type 2 diabetes by starting up an exercise routine, a new study has found. Having gestational diabetes may provide an opportunity for patients to recognize their increased risk of type 2 diabetes and take steps to prevent it, the researchers said. In the study, the researchers looked at more than 4,500 women who had gestational diabetes in the past, and followed them from 1991 to 2007, to examine whether increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviors (such as watching TV) lowered their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. By the end of the study period, 635 women had developed type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that women who increased their activity level so they were moderately exercising for 150 minutes weekly (or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise) had a 47 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared with women who didn't change their activity levels. Conversely, the more time women spent watching TV, the higher their risk of type 2 diabetes was, according to the study, published today (May 19) in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. [9 Healthy Habits You Can Do in 1 Minute (Or Less)] "These findings suggest a hopeful message to women with a history of gestational diabetes, although they are at exceptionally high risk of type 2 diabetes: Promoting an active lifestyle may lower the risk," the researchers wrote in their study. Gestational diabetes is somewhat common: The condition occurs in about 2 to 10 percent of pregnancies. It is also a sign of higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life — women who have had gestational diabetes have a 35 to 60 per Continue reading >>

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