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Cartridge Release" Button In Lantus Solostar

Lantus Optiset 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In Apre-filled Pen

Lantus Optiset 100 Units/ml Solution For Injection In Apre-filled Pen

What is it and how is it used? Lantus is a solution for injection containing insulin glargine. Insulin glargine is a modified insulin, very similar to human insulin. Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar in adults, adolescents and children of 6 years or above with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a disease where your body does not produce enough insulin to control the level of blood sugar. Insulin glargine has a long and steady blood-sugar-lowering action. Table of Contents What do you have to consider before using it? How is it used? What are possible side effects? How should it be stored? Further information What do you have to consider before using it? Do not use Lantus If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to insulin glargine or any of the other ingredients of Lantus (for a full list of ingredients, see section 6?What Lantus contains?). Take special care with Lantus Follow closely the instructions for posology, monitoring (blood and urine tests), diet and physical activity (physical work and exercise), injection technique as discussed with your doctor. If your blood sugar is too low (hypoglycaemia), follow the guidance for hypoglycaemia (see box at the end of this leaflet). Travel Before travelling consult your doctor. You may need to talk about the availability of your insulin in the country you are visiting, supplies of insulin, syringes etc., correct storage of your insulin while travelling, timing of meals and insulin administration while travelling, the possible effects of changing to different time zones, possible new health risks in the countries to be visited, what you should do in emergency situations when you feel unwell or become ill. Illnesses and injuries In the following situations, the management of your diabetes may require a lot of care (f Continue reading >>

How To Use The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

How To Use The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Please check the leaflet for the insulin for complete instructions on how to store SoloSTAR®. If your SoloSTAR® is in cool storage, take it out 1 to 2 hours before you inject to allow it to warm up. Cold insulin is more painful to inject. Keep SoloSTAR® out of the reach and sight of children. Keep your SoloSTAR® in cool storage (36°F–46°F [2°C–8°C]) until first use. Do not allow it to freeze. Do not put it next to the freezer compartment of your refrigerator, or next to a freezer pack. Once you take your SoloSTAR® out of cool storage, for use or as a spare, you can use it for up to 28 days. During this time it can be safely kept at room temperature up to 86°F (30°C). Do not use it after this time. SoloSTAR® in use must not be stored in a refrigerator. Do not use SoloSTAR® after the expiration date printed on the label of the pen or on the carton. Protect SoloSTAR® from light. Discard your used SoloSTAR® as required by your local authorities. Protect your SoloSTAR® from dust and dirt. You can clean the outside of your SoloSTAR® by wiping it with a damp cloth. Do not soak, wash, or lubricate the pen as this may damage it. Your SoloSTAR® is designed to work accurately and safely. It should be handled with care. Avoid situations where SoloSTAR® might be damaged. If you are concerned that your SoloSTAR® may be damaged, use a new one. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin pens have become a popular way for diabetics to give themselves insulin. Insulin pens are available for multiple insulin types. However, as with any technology, pens can be misused leading to medication errors and inaccurate administration of insulin. Although an insulin pen is easy to use, certain precautions must be taken to assure proper use. Below is a list of safety tips to keep in mind when using an insulin pen: 1. Do not share your insulin pen with anyone: Insulin pens should never be used for more than one person. Using insulin pens on more than one person puts people at risk for infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis viruses and HIV, which causes AIDS, the agency warns. Infection can occur even if an insulin pen's needle is changed. We are aware of this happening in hospitals, where, for example, a nurse may not realize the risk. Pen needles are changed in between patients but the very same pen is used for multiple patients! This is dangerous because even if the needle is changed, it's still possible for insulin in the pen to become contaminated. Then, when subsequent patients are injected, there's a danger of passing along harmful bacterial or virus. 2. Do not withdraw insulin from an insulin pen cartridge Using insulin pens as "mini" insulin vials, by drawing up insulin into an insulin syringe, can lead to inaccurate dose measurement the next time the insulin pen is used for dose delivery. The reason for this is related to air entering the pen unintentionally, interfering with the proper mechanics of the pen. 3. Do not leave an open needle attached to an insulin pen Leaving an insulin needle attached to an insulin pen can lead to unintentional air entering into the insulin pen. If unintentional air enters into the insulin pen, it can c Continue reading >>

How Long Should You Keep Insulin Pens?

How Long Should You Keep Insulin Pens?

Did you read our blog on insulin vials and think to yourself, does this apply to my insulin pens too? If so, this post is for you! With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard keep track of how long each of these pens stays good. Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your pen at the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your pen regardless of whether you have any leftover. You might think it’s wasteful, but using the medication past the recommended time can actually do you more harm than good. You may notice if you continue to use insulin from a pen that’s past the manufacturers discard date, your blood glucose may be higher or a greater dose may be needed to achieve a normal blood glucose reading. There are several different types of insulin and a variety of other injectable diabetes medications, and they don’t all have the same recommendations. As a quick reminder, the different categories of insulin are: Rapid-acting. Short-acting (regular). There are no short-acting insulin pens available Intermediate-acting. Long-acting. So how long can you hold on to your insulin pen after you start to use it? Rapid-acting insulin Novolog FlexPen: use within 28 days after first use Novolog cartridge (for use in a re-useable pen): use within 28 days after first use Humalog KwikPen: use within 28 days after first use Humalog cartridge (for use in a re-useable pen): use within 28 days after in-use Apidra SoloStar: use within 28 days after first use Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulin Lantus SoloStar: use within 28 days after first use Toujeo SoloStar: use within 28 days after first use Levemir FlexTouch: use Continue reading >>

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen Generic Name: insulin glargine (Pronunciation: IN su lin AS part, IN su lin AS part PRO ta meen) What is the most important information I should know about insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? What is insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? Insulin glargine is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made. Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Insulin glargine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin glargine. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin glargine. This is not a complete list of side effect Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

How To Change Refills In Lantus Pens

How To Change Refills In Lantus Pens

Are you a diabetic who has been prescribed Lantus? The Lantus insulin pen is a great way to manage your Lantus dosages. Using the pen for your Lantus delivery eliminates the need to manage vials and syringes, and reduces the risk of miscalculations when measuring dosages. Changing the cartridge on your Lantus pen is a quick and easy process, and can be done in a matter of seconds. Push the dosage knob in completely. The cartridge will not release if the dosage knob is not completely in place. Remove the old Lantus cartridge by pressing the "Cartridge Release" button. The used cartridge can be thrown away. Look closely at the new cartridge and make sure that the insulin is clear and free of any particles. Double-check the label to be sure you have the proper type of insulin and the cartridge is not expired. Push the dosage button all the way in, and hold the pen so that the "Cartridge Release" button is at the top. Slide the new cartridge straight into the pen. The cartridge will lock in and click, to let you know it’s all the way in. If it doesn’t seat properly, try to twist it a bit. Do not force the cartridge into place. Remove the cartridge and reinsert it, or try lifting slightly on the cartridge when inserting to slide it into the pen. Do not store your pen in the refrigerator. The cold temperatures can damage the components of the pen, causing potentially incorrect dosages. Continue reading >>

How To Use An Insulin Pen

How To Use An Insulin Pen

Whether you're at home or on the go, an insulin pen offers the benefits of accuracy, convenience, and confidence to people with diabetes. Here's how to use one safely and easily. Whether you're at home or on the go, an insulin pen offers the benefits of accuracy, convenience, and confidence to people with diabetes. Here's how to use one safely and easily. Whether you're at home or on the go, an insulin pen offers the benefits of accuracy, convenience, and confidence to people with diabetes. Here's how to use one safely and easily. Whether you're at home or on the go, an insulin pen offers the benefits of accuracy, convenience, and confidence to people with diabetes. Here's how to use one safely and easily. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens

Insulin Pens

Managing diabetes often requires taking insulin shots throughout the day. Insulin delivery systems such as insulin pens can make giving insulin shots much easier. If you currently use a vial and syringe to deliver your insulin, switching to an insulin pen may make it easier to take your insulin and increase your compliance. Insulin pens do not eliminate your need to poke yourself with a needle. They simply make measuring and delivering your insulin easier. Insulin pens deliver anywhere from .5 to 80 units of insulin at a time. They can deliver insulin in increments of one-half unit, one unit, or two units. The maximum dose and the incremental amount vary among pens. The amount of total insulin units in the cartridges vary as well. The pens come in two basic forms: disposable and reusable. A disposable insulin pen contains a prefilled cartridge, and the entire pen is thrown away when the cartridge is empty. Reusable pens allow you to replace the insulin cartridge when it’s empty. The insulin pen you use depends on the type of insulin you require, the number of units you typically need per insulin shot, and the available pens for that insulin type. The needles on insulin pens come in different lengths and thicknesses, and most fit on all of the available insulin pens. Talk to your doctor or healthcare provider to decide which pen is best for you. Similar to vials of insulin, insulin pens do not require constant refrigeration once they’ve been opened. Insulin pens only require refrigeration before their first use. After its initial use, simply keep your insulin pen out of direct sunlight and in a room-temperature setting. Insulin pens typically stay good for 7 to 28 days after the initial use, depending on the type of insulin they contain. However, if the expiration da Continue reading >>

Injection Force Of Solostar Compared With Other Disposable Insulin Pen Devices At Constant Volume Flow Rates

Injection Force Of Solostar Compared With Other Disposable Insulin Pen Devices At Constant Volume Flow Rates

Injection Force of SoloSTAR Compared with Other Disposable Insulin Pen Devices at Constant Volume Flow Rates sanofi-aventis Deutschland GmbH, Site Frankfurt Devices/Device Industrialisation, Frankfurt, Germany Corresponding Author: Thomas van der Burg, sanofi-aventis Deutschland GmbH, Site Frankfurt Devices/Device Industrialisation, Industriepark Hoechst, D-65926 Frankfurt am Main, Germany; email address [email protected] Disclosure: Thomas van der Burg is an employee of sanofi-aventis. Copyright 2011 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Injection force is a particularly important practical aspect of therapy for patients with diabetes, especially those who have dexterity problems. This laboratory-based study compared the injection force of the SoloSTAR insulin pen (SoloSTAR; sanofi-aventis) versus other available disposable pens at injection speeds based on the delivered volume of insulin released at the needle. Four different prefilled disposable pens were tested: SoloSTAR containing insulin glargine; FlexPen and the Next Generation FlexPen (NGFP) (Novo Nordisk), both containing insulin detemir; and KwikPen containing insulin lispro (Eli Lilly). All pens were investigated using the maximum dispense volume for each pen type [80 units (U) for SoloSTAR; 60 U for the other pens], from the free needle tip dispensing into a beaker. Twenty pens of each type were fitted with the recommended needles and tested at two dose speeds (6 and 10 U/s); each pen was tested twice. Mean plateau injection force and maximum injection force were consistently lower with SoloSTAR compared with FlexPen, NGFP, and KwikPen at both injection speeds tested. An injection speed of 10 U/s was associated with higher injection force compar Continue reading >>

Autopen®

Autopen®

Autopen®: Makes the experience of injecting insulin as easy as possible, even for younger users or users with reduced dexterity. A reusable insulin cartridge delivery pen that is compatible with all pen needles, Autopen® has unique side firing mechanisms for easier injecting and handling. Its automatic insulin delivery means minimal force is required to deliver treatment, regardless of insulin volume, which makes it suitable for patients with low finger strength. Autopen® features a dose selector with audible clicks and visual indicators to ensure correct dosage is set. Assistive accessories are also available for Autopen® to provide an even easier injection experience for people with limited hand movement or grip and for greater control over dosage settings. Autopen® adaptive accessories include a release button extension and larger size dose selector adaptor. Autopen® is compatible with all major brands of pen needle and comes in two models, Autopen®24 for use with SANOFI insulin cartridges and Autopen® Classic for use with Lilly¹ and Wockhardt insulin cartridges. Benefits Simplifies the delivery of insulin injections Low force to inject and usability features make it effective even for users with reduced dexterity Suitable for all types of users 1. AC522/V10/1TF/01 (1998) Continue reading >>

Update On Insulin Treatment For Dogs And Cats: Insulin Dosing Pens And More

Update On Insulin Treatment For Dogs And Cats: Insulin Dosing Pens And More

Authors Thompson A, Lathan P, Fleeman L Accepted for publication 19 February 2015 Checked for plagiarism Yes Peer reviewer comments 3 1School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, Australia; 2College of Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA; 3Animal Diabetes Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Insulin therapy is still the primary therapy for all diabetic dogs and cats. Several insulin options are available for each species, including veterinary registered products and human insulin preparations. The insulin chosen depends on the individual patient's requirements. Intermediate-acting insulin is usually the first choice for dogs, and longer-acting insulin is the first choice for cats. Once the insulin type is chosen, the best method of insulin administration should be considered. Traditionally, insulin vials and syringes have been used, but insulin pen devices have recently entered the veterinary market. Pens have different handling requirements when compared with standard insulin vials including: storage out of the refrigerator for some insulin preparations once pen cartridges are in use; priming of the pen to ensure a full dose of insulin is administered; and holding the pen device in place for several seconds during the injection. Many different types of pen devices are available, with features such as half-unit dosing, large dials for visually impaired people, and memory that can display the last time and dose of insulin administered. Insulin pens come in both reusable and disposable options. Pens have several benefits over syringes, including improved dose accuracy, especially for low insulin doses. Keywords: diabetes, mellitus, canine, feline, NPH, glargine, porcine lente Introduction Insulin the Continue reading >>

Why Has Lantus Changed From Cartridge To Throw Away Pen?

Why Has Lantus Changed From Cartridge To Throw Away Pen?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Why has Lantus changed from cartridge to throw away pen? I've been using Lantus (once a day) for years and its very easy to store/carry around as its in cartridge format. Last time I went for a repeat prescription the diabetic nurse tells me that they are now ONLY doing pens that you use once and throw away. I'm very aware of the cost that my diabetes has on the Health Service and the only reason I can think as to why Lantus are moving away from cartridges is a bigger profit for their company. There is so much extra waste, much more packaging and I'll probably need to find a bigger fridge. For me I find it really inconvenient, especially for holidays or when staying away from home. I have also heard that this is possibly the future of short term insulin? Your DSN is wrong, basically. Or, I hate to be cynical, but maybe a Lantus sales rep took her out for lunch? As far as I'm aware there's no move towards throw-away pens. If I were you I'd go back with this page printed out: (see Doseage Forms and Strenghts) and ask her where she got her info from when it's clear that the manufacturer is still producing 10ml vials. It's 3ml cartridges (not 10ml vials) that are needed to be reused in pens, but they're still on list that Snodger's link takes you too. I agree, I'd be livid if my long acting insulin (Humalin I) ceased to be available in cartridges, as I always carry a pen with spares of both short acting and long acting insulins, in case I'm delayed home at night. If you go on the Opticlik site though it says.... "Thank you for visiting OptiClik.com. Because the Lantus Cartridge for use with OptiClik is no longer manufactured, this site is no longer active Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen

Insulin Pen

Two types of modern, pre-filled insulin syringes. An insulin pen is used to inject insulin for the treatment of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. It is composed of an insulin cartridge (integrated or bought separately) and a dial to measure the dose, and is used with disposable pen needles to deliver the dose. It was introduced and marketed as NovoPen by the Danish company Novo Nordisk in 1985. Types of pens[edit] A number of companies make insulin pens including Novo Nordisk, Aventis, Eli Lilly and Biocon. These companies produce pens for most of their insulins, including NovoLog/NovoRapid, Humalog, Levemir and Lantus. There are two pen systems: durable and prefilled: A durable pen uses a replaceable insulin cartridge. When the insulin cartridge is empty, the empty cartridge is disposed of and a new one is inserted in the pen. A prefilled pen is entirely disposable. The pen comes pre-filled with insulin, and when the insulin cartridge or reservoir is empty, the entire unit is discarded. Most brands of insulin are now available for use in pens, these include: NovoMix, NovoRapid and Levemir by Novo Nordisk Lantus and Apidra by Sanofi-Aventis Humulin and Humalog by Eli Lilly and Company INSUGEN and BASALOG by Biocon Global Patient Uptake[edit] Insulin pens are used by 95% of insulin-treated patients in Europe, Asia, Australia and Scandinavia with excellent results.[1] They are currently underutilized but growing in use in the United States. Insulin pens offer several significant advantages over insulin syringes: ease of handling, accuracy, and they are more discreet to use and easier to transport. To use an insulin pen[edit] How to prime an insulin pen. Screw or click on a new pen needle. If necessary, prime the pen to remove any air from the needle Continue reading >>

Is Lantus Solostar For Diabetes Right For You?

Is Lantus Solostar For Diabetes Right For You?

A Lantus Solostar Pen, also known as Insulin Glargine is a man-made form of insulin that is usually produced naturally by the body. It works by lowering the amount of sugar or glucose that is present in the blood. While there are different forms of man-made insulin, insulin glargine is different than traditional types. Why Lantus Solostar Pen Is Prescribed: Insulin Glargine (Solostar) is prescribed to treat type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Based on a doctor’s discretion, it could also be prescribed for other purposes. Risks of taking Lantus Solostar: Even if you are on the same medication as someone else, you should never share an injection cartridge or pen. The sharing of pens and cartridges allows the spread of serious diseases like hepatitis and HIV. If you are allergic to insulin glargine or have ever had an allergic reaction, you should not take it. In order to ensure that the Lantus Solostar Pen is right for you, you should be sure to tell your doctor if you have CHF (congestive heart failure), kidney disease, liver disease, or if you have been prescribed and currently take medication for diabetes in oral form. Lantus Solostar is currently in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it isn’t yet known whether or not insulin glargine can affect the unborn baby. Make sure you advise your doctor if you are pregnant, are planning on getting pregnant, or find out that you are pregnant while you are taking Lantus Solostar. The same goes for breast feeding. While it isn’t known if it can in fact be spread through breast milk, you should still let your doctor know if you are breast feeding a baby. How to use Lantus Solostar Pen: The Lantus Solostar Pen enables you to inject insulin into your blood stream. The pen itself contains 300 units of insulin and is Continue reading >>

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