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Can You Use Out Of Date Insulin

How Long Does Insulin Last Once It's Been Opened?

How Long Does Insulin Last Once It's Been Opened?

A fellow caregiver asked... My mother has type 2 diabetes and needs help with her insulin injections. After I open a new bottle, how long does insulin last for, how should I store it, and how do I know whether it's gone bad? Expert Answers As a general rule, most bottles of insulin are good for 28 days once they're opened. Of course, how quickly a person goes through a vial is highly individual. Some may go through a bottle in a week or two. Others, on a lower dosage, may not use all the insulin within four weeks. But the drug's stability and potency is only guaranteed for 28 days. Opened insulin pens typically last 14 days, though some last only 10 days. If you're uncertain, check with your mother's pharmacist to find out how long her insulin should last. When either of you opens a new vial or pen, make a note on the calendar -- and note the date when you'll need to throw out any remaining insulin. It's best to store an opened bottle of insulin at room temperature, even though manufacturers often recommend refrigeration for opened containers. It's usually less painful to inject insulin when it's at room temperature than when it's cold. Store unopened insulin vials and pen cartridges in the fridge, though, where they should last until their expiration date. Insulin shouldn't be exposed to extreme temperatures, so don't leave it in the car, next to the stove, in the freezer, or in the bathroom. If the bottle freezes, it must be discarded. Two typical signs that insulin has gone bad: poor performance and unusual appearance. If your mother is following her treatment plan and her glucose levels stay stubbornly, inexplicably high, her insulin may have lost its potency. Insulin that's cloudy when it's supposed to be clear or that contains particles, crystals, or small clumps Continue reading >>

Expiration Date On Vial Of Prozinc

Expiration Date On Vial Of Prozinc

I am preparing to give my first home injection of ProZinc. I noted the expiration date was last month (11/2017). Is this still going to be effective? I have no other vials on hand and being Sunday no source to obtain more. Not planning on giving this until after 8:15 as I fed Goma at 6:15 and will also be attempting my first glucose level test at 8:15 The vet charged you for out of date insulin?? My understanding is that Prozinc has a shelf life of 2 years, and the date on the vial is the expiration based on that. Once you actually open a vial, the manufacturer says it is only good for 60 days; however, I have heard from several people (and my vet) that it can last for several months if stored and handled properly. So, my thoughts on it are 1) if your vet charged you for that, you should get your money back, or he should give you a vial that has not expired; 2) I do not think it will hurt to use it, but you are not going to know if it is effective until you give it then test Goma in a few hours to see if her BG level has come down. Maybe some other folks have personal experience with expired insulin and will chime in. I do not. Your vet is something else for giving you that though! give insulin as soon as kitty is finished eating. I think on #2 Kris meant: do the pre-injection BG test And I would say to look at the insulin - as long as it's cloudy and doesn't have any little white things floating in it, you can likely use it until Monday. But definitely take it back to the vet and get a newer vial. By the time a vial reaches expiration, it is already a couple of years old. If it does have little things floating in it, don't use it. And here is a link to your other thread so we can keep track: The vet charged you for out of date insulin?? My understanding is that Prozin Continue reading >>

Expired Insulin - To Use Or Not

Expired Insulin - To Use Or Not

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have a vial of Humalog, new and unopened, that has an expiration date of 12/07. Am I risking by using this insulin? As far as I know the worst thing that will happen will be that it won't work. I wouldnt personally use it, but that is just because I dont want to risk a huge bg spike from lack of insulin after a meal, its not worth the risk. I would use it and test. I might not use it in a pump (infusion set, etc) without first trying one shot to confirm viability. The stuff doesn't go from 100% perfect to useless in 3 months. It loses potency over time. The only caveat is cloudiness. It has to be clear. I have a vial of Humalog, new and unopened, that has an expiration date of 12/07. Am I risking by using this insulin? Do you have an vials of humalog that are NOT expired? If so, it is unnecessary to use the expired one. The viability of expired insulin is QUESTIONABLE at best. I **ALWAYS** feel like I did something wrong when I have BG spikes that I am directly responsible for and feel like I should be sitting in the naughty chair for having done so.. Hey, if you have NO other choice, you do what you've got to do, but if you have insulin within it's shelf life range, stick with the "good stuff". While sticking a proverbial fly in the ointment is entertaining, guinea pigs are just that because they can't say NO. And just an FYI, I am GREAT at giving advice *cough* at times lousy at taking it. If the insulin has been kept in the fridge the entire time and it is within 2 or 3 months of the expiration date, I'd have no reservations about using it. Of course, I'd try to use it within 30 days of Continue reading >>

Bsc's Top Ten Indications Your Insulin Has Gone Bad!

Bsc's Top Ten Indications Your Insulin Has Gone Bad!

BSC's Top Ten Indications Your Insulin Has Gone BAD! I've been traveling a lot lately. And during one of my outings, I put my extra humalog pen in the hotel fridge. One would think that I would learn from experience , but in fact I don't. So I woke up one morning and took out a bottle of water and noticed the water was partly frozen. This is not good for insulin. And I don't know if I mentioned it, but I am also cheap. So despite knowing better, I used the pen for like 4-5 days, getting increasingly frustrated at the uselessness of the insulin and my own stupidity for not throwing the thing away. In the end, I had escalated my dosings to like 5 times my usual dose. And then when I started a new pen, I continued my stupidity by not properly going back to my proper I:C and had a few mild hypos. So in honor of my own boneheadedness, I've decided to write a list indications that my insulin is bad. Hopefully one day, I'll actually pay attention to the list. 10. Your insulin vial/pen has been open so long it has cobwebs on it 8. You have so many punctures in the stopper you can see sunlight through it 7. You know you have exposed the insulin to freezing or high temperatures, or left it out in the the sunlight far too long 6. Your insulin is cloudy when it is supposed to be clear 5. Your insulin has clumps even after you rolled it like you are supposed to 4. Your insulin has threads or strings in it 3. Insulin from your suspect vial/pen acts much differently than insulin from another just opened vial/pen 2. Your insulin has changed to an "interesting" color 1. Your blood sugar stays high even after you injected 5 times your normal correction dose Please feel free to add you stories of bad insulin and "indications." I have heard so many horror stories of people using bad insul Continue reading >>

Old Insulin Better Than No Insulin?

Old Insulin Better Than No Insulin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I ran out of insulin a few weeks back while I was out of town, and couldn't get a refill on my insulin (without paying full price) because I had already refilled the week before. Anyway, I've decided to give a friend an extra bottle of insulin where I travel to on a regular basis in case I forget / run out of insulin unexpectedly, but started to think: if it's several months down the road - would the insulin still be any good? (We're dealing with an opened refrigerated bottle of Humalog.) let me think here, I THINK 3 months after its been opened refigerated, I know it's 1 month out of the fridge We get our insulin thru the mail, three month supply at a time, so it must be safe in the fridge for at least three months. But it would be better if it was unopened, I would think LocationSomewhare in the South Pacific??? but started to think: if it's several months down the road - would the insulin still be any good? (We're dealing with an opened refrigerated bottle of Humalog.) As long it's been in the fridge it should be ok I would think. For me I have disposable syringes to get the last drop as I hate waste. Which reminds me to go to the pharmacy and get some novorapid. Does anyone know if the potency just diminishes, or if it goes bad completely after 3 months or so? I am sure if the vial has not been opened it will be good for a very long time. I would also think that a partially used vial if refrigerated would have an extended life. One thing you could consider if you can get it is a box of the Humalog pen cartridges. Each vial in a box with 5 I believe is 3 ml in volume rather than 10 ml (Ith Continue reading >>

How Long Should You Keep Insulin Pens?

How Long Should You Keep Insulin Pens?

Did you read our blog on insulin vials and think to yourself, does this apply to my insulin pens too? If so, this post is for you! With so many different insulin and insulin-like products out there these days it can be hard keep track of how long each of these pens stays good. Depending on your dose, you may still have insulin left in your pen at the manufacturer-recommended time to throw it away. If this sounds like a familiar situation, know that it is important to throw away your pen regardless of whether you have any leftover. You might think it’s wasteful, but using the medication past the recommended time can actually do you more harm than good. You may notice if you continue to use insulin from a pen that’s past the manufacturers discard date, your blood glucose may be higher or a greater dose may be needed to achieve a normal blood glucose reading. There are several different types of insulin and a variety of other injectable diabetes medications, and they don’t all have the same recommendations. As a quick reminder, the different categories of insulin are: Rapid-acting. Short-acting (regular). There are no short-acting insulin pens available Intermediate-acting. Long-acting. So how long can you hold on to your insulin pen after you start to use it? Rapid-acting insulin Novolog FlexPen: use within 28 days after first use Novolog cartridge (for use in a re-useable pen): use within 28 days after first use Humalog KwikPen: use within 28 days after first use Humalog cartridge (for use in a re-useable pen): use within 28 days after in-use Apidra SoloStar: use within 28 days after first use Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulin Lantus SoloStar: use within 28 days after first use Toujeo SoloStar: use within 28 days after first use Levemir FlexTouch: use Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

Can Insulin Go Back In The Fridge?

After removing insulin glargine (Lantus) from the refrigerator for use, can it be refrigerated over and over again after having warmed to room temperature, or does this degrade it? Continue reading >>

Insulin Expiration Date

Insulin Expiration Date

Brunilda Nazario, MD, is the Lead Medical Director at WebMD and is responsible for reviewing WebMD content and ensuring its accuracy, timeliness, and credibility. Nazario works with WebMD's network of expert doctors and health care professionals where she shares her goals, vision, and the challenges faced in helping to develop an educational and successful learning experience for WebMD's readers. Nazario is dedicated to helping readers understand health information. She is a board certified Internist and Endocrinologist, she is also certified in Advanced Diabetes Management. Upon completion of a certification in bariatric medicine, Dr Nazario is now a Diplomate for the American Board of Obesity Medicine. She is Chair-elect for The Obesity Society's Latin American Association Section. Continue reading >>

Using Expired Medicine

Using Expired Medicine

When we act like responsible adults, we always look at the expiration dates on the containers of prescription medicine and over-the-counter drugs that we use. Just to give one example, I can’t count the number of times that I have tossed old aspirin tablets. Now, it turns out, I was throwing away my money. From now on I will be saving money after reading an article in the current issue of my favorite health newsletter, which I subscribe to the old-fashioned way, on paper. The article, “Out on a date” in the October issue of the “UC Berkeley Wellness Letter,” explains that expiration dates are guarantees that prescription and over-the-counter drugs will be both potent and safe until then. But they don’t mean that after the expiration date, they won’t be effective or safe. It all comes down to money. Ours and that of the drug companies. “In many cases, drugs are stable for longer,” the article concludes, “but there’s little incentive for manufacturers to test them to see how long they will really last. Longer expiration dates would cut down on sales.” At least in this respect (and in probably many other ways), my friend Gretchen Becker is wiser than me. She tells me that she was already taking the expiration dates with a grain of salt. “It’s not as if the medication is fine until midnight Sunday and then suddenly, starting Monday at 1 a.m., it’s no good,” she says. How long since the drug companies stamped out their pills is just one of many factors determining when the drugs begin to break down. Heat, humidity, light, and temperature fluctuations all count. Those are good reasons for us to store our pills in cool, dry, and dark places. Keeping them in our cars and bathrooms would be the worst places. Insulin is one huge exception to the ex Continue reading >>

5 Insulin Mistakes You Need To Avoid

5 Insulin Mistakes You Need To Avoid

If you use insulin to keep your blood sugar in check, these five common mistakes could lead to dangerous lows or highs. What you need to know: 1. Wrong dose, wrong insulin. There are four basic types of insulin: Rapid- and short-acting insulins are injected before a meal to cover the rise in blood sugar from the food you’re about to eat; intermediate- and long-acting insulins control blood sugar for up to 24 hours, covering periods of time when shorter-acting types have stopped working. People with type 1 diabetes often take a combination of shorter-and longer-acting insulins – and that’s where mix-ups can happen. Among the most common: Taking a too-high dose of a rapid-acting insulin because you’ve mistaken it for a longer-acting type, according to a report in the journal Clinical Diabetes. The danger: Low blood sugar. The fix: If this happens to you, eat enough carbohydrates to cover the extra insulin, keep monitoring your blood sugar, watch for signs of hypoglycemia (such as shaking, sweating or a headache ) and call your doctor right away if you have any concerns. To prevent it from happening again, make sure you know which insulin is which and what the right dose is. In a 2014 report in the journal Prescrire International, experts note that sometimes, doctors and pharmacies abbreviate the word “units” to “U”, which can look like an extra zero, leading people to take insulin doses ten times higher than prescribed. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you’re unsure of the right dose. 2. Sharing an insulin pen. Insulin pens are a convenient way to get a just-right dose without filling and injecting yourself with a conventional syringe. They can be used multiple times, with a new needle each time. But a fresh needle doesn’t mean sharing’s OK. The Cent Continue reading >>

Check Your Kit’s Expiration Date

Check Your Kit’s Expiration Date

Glucagon should not be used if you have pheochromocytoma or if you are allergic to Glucagon. Make sure you tell your healthcare provider if you have been diagnosed with or have been suspected of having an insulinoma as Glucagon should be used cautiously in this situation. You and anyone who may need to help you during an emergency should become familiar with how to use Glucagon before an emergency arises. Read the Information for the User provided in the kit. Make sure that your relatives or close friends know that if you become unconscious, medical assistance must always be sought. If you are unconscious, Glucagon can be given while awaiting medical assistance. If you have questions concerning the use of this product, consult a doctor, nurse or pharmacist. WARNING: YOU MAY BE IN A COMA FROM SEVERE HYPERGLYCEMIA (HIGH BLOOD GLUCOSE) RATHER THAN HYPOGLYCEMIA. IN SUCH A CASE, YOU WILL NOT RESPOND TO GLUCAGON AND REQUIRE IMMEDIATE MEDICAL ATTENTION. Tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions and prescription and over-the-counter drugs. Tell your doctor if you have been diagnosed with or have been suspected of having pheochromocytoma or an insulinoma. Act quickly. Prolonged unconsciousness may be harmful. Make sure your family and friends know to turn you on your side to prevent choking if you are unconscious. The contents of the syringe are inactive and must be mixed with the Glucagon in the accompanying bottle immediately before giving injection. Do not prepare Glucagon for Injection until you are ready to use it. Glucagon should not be used unless the solution is clear and of a water-like consistency. The usual adult dose is 1 mg (1 unit). For children weighing less than 44 lbs (20 kg), give 1/2 adult dose (0.5 mg). For children, withdraw 1/2 of the solution f Continue reading >>

Out Of Date Omnipods

Out Of Date Omnipods

I was on Omnipod 2 years ago, before I got off for insurance reasons. With my new insurance I am able to get back on it. I have 2 boxes of Omnipods that expired in 2015. I know that by letter of the law they should be thrown away, but I am using one and it is working fine. In reality all that should have deteriorated is the battery life correct? Battery could go bad, and possibly the FEP material that is used to make the canula could start to deteriorate over time. Same for the rubber seal that covers the fill port. But yeah, Id use it too!! Just keep an eye on your BG. Maybe Insulet will swap them for you. All it costs you is a couple minutes to make the call and ask them. Well, everything goes well, until the pod fails. It didnt give me an occlusion error or anything, just started the death beep and the pdm read insulin delivery has stopped. First pod lasted 26 hours, second pod lasted 12 hours. The expiration date of those pods were June 2015. My new pump should be here within a week so Im going to keep trying the old ones until then. Yeah, if you call them and indicate there was an error, Ive never had anyone ask me what was the expiration on that POD? They just say, OK, well send you a new one in the mail. On two occasions, theyve asked us to mail back the PODs because the errors were not familiar and they indicated the PODS would be analyzed by their techs. The way I see it isits not cheating because you paid for them at some point!! Expired or not, there was cost associated and if you can get a new POD it seems fair to me. This thread got me curious about Insulets policy, so I called them to ask! They said they do not swap pods that have passed their expiration date. Agreeing with what ClaudandDaye said, they have never asked me for an expiration date either. So Continue reading >>

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

How Long Should Insulin Be Used Once A Vial Is Started?

Editor’s comment: The commentary by Dr. Grajower has such important clinical relevance that responses were invited from the three pharmaceutical companies that supply insulin in the U.S. and the American Diabetes Association, and all of these combined in this commentary. The commenting letter and individual responses were authored separately and are completely independent of each other. Diabetic patients treated with insulin, whether for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, are prone to often unexplained swings in their blood glucose. These swings can vary from dangerously low to persistently high levels. Most diabetic patients, and most physicians, will adjust insulin regimens so as to avoid hypoglycemia at the expense of hyperglycemia. Among the “textbook” reasons for variable glucose responses to any given insulin regimen are 1) site of administration, 2) exercise, 3) bottles not adequately mixed before drawing the insulin (for NPH, Lente, or Ultralente), and 4) duration of treatment with insulin (1). A new insulin was marketed by Aventis Pharmaceuticals about 1 year ago, insulin glargine (Lantus). The manufacturer seemed to stress that patients not use a started bottle of this insulin for >28 days (2). Two patients of mine highlighted this point. L.K. is a 76-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed at 55 years of age, and treated with insulin since age 56. Her insulin regimen was changed to Lantus at night together with Novolog before meals. She monitors her blood glucose four times a day. She used a bottle of Lantus until it ran out; therefore, a bottle lasted for 2 months. Her recent HbA1c was 7.6%. I retrospectively analyzed her home glucose readings by averaging her fasting blood glucose levels for the first 15 days of a new bottle and the last 15 days of tha Continue reading >>

Out Of Date Insulin | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Out Of Date Insulin | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community hi all i have just come back from the chemist and been told my prescription for levemir inolet as been delayed due to the fact that the batch they had was out of date i have checked the batch that i have been injecting and it is also out of date by 4 months from the same chemist what should i do? thanks sue have just got off the phone with them and they told me to report it to Environmental Health Did they also tell you how to get some more insulin? Did they also tell you how to get some more insulin? the chemist are going to deliver me a new supply before they close and you can bet your bottom dollar i will be checking the exp date. Oh that's good.Yes I'll bet you will check!! Using slightly out of date insulin is preferable to using no insulin. By one year post date it will still be at least 95% potent. To a degree it depends how it's been stored, some people have found no/little difference with outdated insulin while others have found the potency starts to decline quite rapidly. You can probably get away with using it as long as you TEST and make sure your doses are adequate, I suspect expiry dates are set very conservative to ensure patients throw away perfectly good insulin and order more, and to cover the effects of shipping in hot climates. Continue reading >>

How Long After Expire Do You Use Insulin?

How Long After Expire Do You Use Insulin?

How long after expire do you use insulin? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. How long after expire do you use insulin? How long after the expire date do you think insulin - Lantus in particular - is still effective? I'm going on vacation and need to bring back up insulin in case my pump fails. I have lots of leftover Lantus with an expire date of 4/07. It's been refrigerated the whole time. What do you think? Safe to use if needed? How long after expire do you use insulin? LocationSomewhare in the South Pacific??? How long after the expire date do you think insulin - Lantus in particular - is still effective? Try it and see if the lantus will work but if not then distroy it and get a fresh lot. I'm a chicken. I wouldn't use it past the expire date. I'd also say that to be safe and for complete ease of mind, get an RX from the doctor and get a fresh vial. I've used Humalog 6 months after and NPH 9 months after the expiration date and it still worked but I've not tried it with Lantus yet. Sorry I can be of no help. it's seems ok but if should be careful,take one BS tester to test when you use expire products It should be fine, if anything it will not work as well (as opposed to not at all) If you are vacationing in your state--you should carry a Rx from your doc. If you are leaving the state, you may want to get a new vial. I've never had a problem with expired stuff, but it rarely gets to that point as I use it so fast. My first endo was a MD/PhD and he talked to me a bit about his research lab work because I was currently working my way towards a PhD in microbiology. He said that they use expired insulin in his lab well past t Continue reading >>

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