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Can You Reverse Insulin Resistance?

Hypothyroidism And Insulin Resistance [4 Steps To Reverse It And Finally Lose Weight]

Hypothyroidism And Insulin Resistance [4 Steps To Reverse It And Finally Lose Weight]

Do you feel like it's impossible to lose weight with Hypothyroidism? ​It actually isn't impossible and I will explain how later, but first I need to share a story with you. ​I had a patient who came to see me in the office recently. She was 43, on levothyroxine (for years), about 60 pounds overweight, and wanted my help in balancing her hormones and help her lose some of that weight. ​ Like most other people, she had tried to lose weight following every diet you can think of, but nothing seemed to work for her. So I got to testing her labs. Know what I found? ​ Insulin resistance. ​ And THAT was her primary problem. Her thyroid wasn't all that bad, she ultimately did better on Armour thyroid - but her main problem was the insulin. Once we got her on the right regimen, cleaned up her diet, fixed her adrenals, replaced nutrient deficiencies and put her on a fasting program her weight started to shed off. And that's what we are going to talk about today. ​Hypothyroidism and Insulin Resistance. And why it's impossible to lose weight unless you address BOTH issues. What is Insulin Resistance? ​Insulin is the hormone that increases after you eat a lot of sugar. It puts sugar inside your cells and protects your body from high levels of sugar in the blood. That's what it's supposed to do - when everything is working correctly. When insulin levels remain chronically elevated (like when we eat a lot of sugar in our diet), your body becomes resistant to insulin. And that's where all the problems start. High levels of insulin cause you to store the calories you eat from your diet as fat in your belly. ​So high levels of insulin = you gain weight (even if you eat fewer calories). I've put together a list of some symptoms I see in my patients that have insulin resista Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance

1 Pick complex carbohydrates. Try to make most of your carbohydrate intake consist of complex carbohydrates. This means that they're more complicated molecularly and take longer for your body to break down. This may help your body break down glucose and may help you feel fuller longer, controlling weight and appetite control. Examples of complex carbohydrates include whole unprocessed foods like:[5] Whole grains Peas Lentils Beans Vegetables 2 Avoid processed foods. Try to keep your food as close to its original or natural form. To do this, limit processed or prepared foods and cook from scratch as much as possible. Processed food often contains large amounts of sugar. Read labels to determine how much sugar is in a product, but realize that manufacturers are not required to list added sugars. An easy way to avoid processed foods is to avoid "white" foods (no white bread, white pasta, or white rice). For example, one 6-ounce serving of flavored low-fat yogurt has 38 grams of sugar (which is the equivalent of 7 teaspoons of sugar). 3 Cut back on sugary drinks and simple carbohydrates. While sugars alone don't cause diabetes, eating more high-fructose corn syrup is linked to an increased risk of insulin resistance, T2D, cardiovascular disease, and obesity.[6][7] Avoid simple carbohydrates that contain glucose, sucrose, and fructose. These include: [8] Soft drinks Sweeteners: maple syrup, honey, table sugars, jams Candies, cakes, pastries 4 Increase your fiber intake. Studies have shown that eating insoluble fiber along with whole grains can reduce your risk of T2D.[9][10] Try to eat insoluble fiber with each meal. For example, you can sprinkle one tablespoon of ground flaxseeds over each meal. Good sources of fiber include:[11] Brans: corn bran, oat bran, wheat bran Beans Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance In 4 Easy Steps

Reverse Insulin Resistance In 4 Easy Steps

When it comes to metabolism and weight loss, it’s mostly about insulin. Insulin is also a major factor in many women’s health conditions such as PCOS, acne, progesterone deficiency, and heavy periods. Healthy insulin sensitivity is how you keep inflammation down. It’s how you reduce your long-term risk of diabetes, cancer, osteoporosis, dementia, and heart disease. Do you have insulin resistance? It’s time to find out. What is insulin resistance? Under normal conditions, your hormone insulin rises briefly after eating. It stimulates your liver and muscles to take up sugar from your blood and convert it to energy. This causes your blood sugar to fall, and then your insulin to fall. When you are insulin sensitive, both your sugar and insulin are low on a fasting blood test. When you have insulin resistance, your blood sugar may be normal but your insulin will be high. Why? Because your liver and muscles are not responding properly to insulin, so your pancreas makes more. Too much insulin then generates inflammation and pushes calories into fat storage. Too much insulin also impairs ovulation and stimulates your ovaries to make testosterone, which is a major cause of PCOS. Insulin resistance is common and affects at least one in four adults. It is also called pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome. How to diagnose insulin resistance Blood test: The way to diagnose insulin resistance is to test insulin–not blood sugar. Ask your doctor to order “fasting insulin” or a “glucose tolerance test with insulin.” Look at your insulin reading (not just your blood sugar reading). Your fasting insulin should be less than 55 pmol/L (8 mIU/L ). One hour after the sugar challenge, your insulin should be less than 270 pmol/L (45 mIU/L). You can also use a blood test called HO Continue reading >>

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

Breaking news! Some newly discovered compounds have just been found to turn off all of the genes that cause diabetes. Are these compounds found in a pill bottle? No! Instead, you’ll find them on your dinner plate — in rye bread and pasta. (As I recently wrote in one of my blogs, rye contains special phytonutrients that turn off all the genes responsible for diabetes — in just a few weeks.) Last week, I explained how to find out if you are pre-diabetic or diabetic. Half of the 24 million people with diabetes don’t know they have it and nearly all the 60 million people with pre-diabetes don’t know they have it. Today, I want to share with you more information about what you can do NOW to prevent and reverse diabetes and pre-diabetes. And rye bread isn’t the only answer — I’ve got a lot more good advice, too. But first I want to emphasize new research that should be headlines news but never saw the light of day. Do our current drugs treatments for diabetes actually work to prevent heart attacks and death? Surely lowering blood sugar in diabetics is an effective strategy for reducing the risk of death and heart disease. It would seem obvious that if diabetes is a disease of high blood sugar, then reducing blood sugar would be beneficial. However elevated sugar is only a symptom, not the cause of the problem. The real problem is elevated insulin unchecked over decades from a highly refined carbohydrate diet, a sedentary lifestyle and environmental toxins. Most medications and insulin therapy are aimed at lowering blood sugar through increasing insulin. In the randomized ACCORD trial of over 10,000 patients, this turns out to be a bad idea. In the intensive glucose-lowering group, there were no fewer heart attacks, and more patients died. Yet we continue to pa Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Weight Loss

Insulin Resistance And Weight Loss

Insulin resistance and weight loss… How are they related? Insulin resistance is related to diabetes, a condition that keeps your body from producing or using its insulin effectively, and it can make it incredibly difficult to lose weight. A heads up before reading this article: The terms ‘diabetes‘ and ‘prediabetes‘ are discussed a lot in this article. Even if you don’t have either of these conditions, don’t dismiss the information in this article. Here’s why. Insulin resistance, left unchecked, can LEAD to diabetes. It’s the first step in those that become prediabetic and eventually diabetic, and it’s VERY important to reverse insulin resistance so that you don’t become diabetic. Insulin resistance and diabetes is unfortunately common in today’s world, and untold numbers of adults are prediabetic, often without knowing it. If you’ve already received a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or you’ve struggled throughout your life with type 1, you may have a deeper understanding of the constant struggle to maintain proper insulin levels. Here is the problem: Insulin resistance can cause weight gain and make it VERY difficult to lose weight. The way your body breaks down sugar dictates whether you gain, maintain, or lose pounds. To get a better understanding of this sadly all-too-common condition, let’s discuss what insulin resistance is, how this condition arises, and what you can to do successfully lose weight while managing this complication. What Causes Insulin Resistance? I’m going to put this in laymen’s terms so as to avoid getting too scientific (we’ll outline some more of the scientific details in the next section). Insulin resistance is sadly a self-inflicted wound and even sadder is the fact that most people have no idea that they are Continue reading >>

A Few Simple Changes Can Help Reverse Insulin Resistance Naturally

A Few Simple Changes Can Help Reverse Insulin Resistance Naturally

Reset Scientists have known that calorie restriction, when accompanied by optimum nutrition (also known as C.R.O.N.) can extend lifespan of animals 30 to 230 %, depending on the species. Primate studies are in process. It will be another 10 years before we known the final results, and no doubt, results will then lead to even more questions. What we do know, from major studies of centenarians already underway, is that the demographics have nothing much in common. Many centenarians are smokers, for example. They come from all over the world without favoring any geographic location in particular. However, there are 3 consistent blood metabolic indicators of all centenarians that are relatively consistent: low sugar, low triglyceride, and low insulin. All three are relatively low for age. Among these three variables insulin is the common denominator. The level of insulin sensitivity of the cell is one of the most important markers of lifespan. Many lifestyle factors can contribute to a resistance to insulin, so in this article, we will go into what exactly this means, what it affects, and how to reverse insulin resistance naturally. Insulin When we eat, the food we consume turns into sugar once inside the body. This is particularly true of carbohydrates such as potatoes or rice. This sugar circulates within us, and under the influence of insulin, is absorbed into the surrounding cells and tissue where it is metabolized into energy, or in the case of excessive sugar, stored for future use. Insulin is commonly known as a hormone secreted by the beta cells of the pancreas that lowers the blood sugar by promoting their transport from the blood stream to the cell. Cells, in turn, use sugar as fuel to generate ATP, the energy currency of the body. Insulin’s real purpose in our Continue reading >>

How To Diagnose, Prevent And Treat Insulin Resistance [infographic]

How To Diagnose, Prevent And Treat Insulin Resistance [infographic]

What You Need to Know about Sugar and Insulin Resistance In today’s post our fructose journey comes to a sweet conclusion, with answers to the questions that really matter: How much sugar is safe for you to eat? How much fructose and glucose is in your favorite foods, drinks, and sweeteners? How can you tell if you have insulin resistance (damaged carbohydrate metabolism)? What are some of the common clues? What tests can you ask your doctor to run? What can you do to take control of your health? I’ve included an infographic of 10 simple strategies that go beyond cutting added sugars, to improve your metabolism and prevent/treat common diseases. Earlier in this series we discovered that fructose is not scarier than glucose. In fact, consuming too much glucose is even riskier than consuming too much fructose because glucose is a more powerful trigger for “insulin resistance.” It is excess glucose that raises blood sugar and insulin levels, turns off fat burning, shifts fat and cholesterol production into overdrive, feeds cancer cells, and sets the stage for inflammation throughout the body.1) People with insulin resistance are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the future, so insulin resistance is often referred to as “pre-diabetes.” So, should you focus on reducing the amount of glucose-y food you eat and lean towards fructose-y foods instead? Good luck with that…people talk about fructose as though it’s a separate sugar from glucose, but practically speaking, it’s not. In real foods, fructose never exists alone—wherever fructose is, glucose is right there beside it, so it’s not easy to separate them in your diet. Even the vast majority of manufactured foods and beverages contain a mixture of fructose and glucose, as you’ll see in the Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance At Midlife

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance At Midlife

Insulin resistance has become a huge problem in our culture and it can lead to many of the chronic health problems we see today, including obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It is also linked to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, thyroid problems, muscle loss, fat gain, fatty liver, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and other cancers as well. And, insulin resistance has even been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, did you know that insulin resistance can also cause many of the symptoms most women attribute to menopause? It’s true. Insulin has a cascading effect on all of your hormones, including estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. When insulin isn’t doing its job, it’s nearly impossible to reduce the symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes and night sweats. It also makes weight loss very difficult. Jason Fung, M.D. – who you can listen to on my radio show, Flourish – has done much research in the area of insulin control. His work shows that getting insulin in balance can be the key to getting your hormones and your health back in balance. What is Insulin and How Does It Work? Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Its main job is to manage how your body uses glucose for energy. When blood sugar levels rise after a meal, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body’s cells — especially cells in the liver and muscles — absorb glucose. Your liver converts stored glucose to glycogen for future use. When blood sugar levels are too low, your pancreas releases a hormone called glucagon. Glucagon forces the liver to convert glycogen back to glucose, which causes your blood sugar to rise. You always have low levels of insulin circulating in your body. When insulin is out of balance, the result is abnormal blood sugar Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Symptoms - Best Diet, Treatment And How To Reverse

Insulin Resistance Symptoms - Best Diet, Treatment And How To Reverse

Before we discuss how to identify the presence of insulin resistance symptoms in your life you must first understand the role of insulin in your body. When we eat sugar or any food that breaks down into sugar in the body, this elevates the body's glucose levels. Glucose is the technical term for blood sugar. When blood sugar rises, then the pancreas has the job of bringing it back down again, and it does so by releasing insulin. When the pancreas releases insulin, this alerts the glucose receptors to open and one of three things occur. It is taken into the cell immediately and used for energy, then any excess glucose either gets stored in the liver as glycogen which can be used at a later date as needed, or it's stored as fat in the cell. There is always more sugar than the body needs when one eats sugar and carbohydrates, so a great deal of it is getting stored as fat. Glucose is essential for the mind and body to function adequately, however you don't want too much or too little. Too much leads to things like insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, while too little leads to things like hypoglycemia and lack of energy. Unfortunately, many people don't notice the arrival of insulin resistance symptoms before its too late, because they have not been educated about what to look for and the diet they have been led to believe is healthy is really at the root. Every time you eat sugar or a food that gets broken down into sugar, including starches, beans and whole grains, then your body goes through the process described above. If you are continually ingesting foods that force the body to go through this process, then over time their is too much sugar for the pancreas to handle. Each time it detects sugar in the blood stream, then it releases insulin. The liver can only store Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Research indicates that you don't need drugs to control blood sugar. Food, herbs, and spices are the future of medicine. Over 80 million Americans have insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes. And you could be on the road to diabetes for 10 years or more and never even know it. Here's what happens. The hormone insulin directs your cells to open up and take in glucose from the blood. With insulin resistance, your cells become desensitized to insulin. They ignore the instructions to open up and take in glucose. Your body keeps producing more insulin to try to get the message heard. But it doesn't work. And your insulin levels rise higher and higher. Those chronically high insulin levels cause rapid weight gain, premature aging, high blood pressure, heart disease, and higher cancer risks. Eventually they lead to type 2 diabetes. Herbs, spices and foods are your first line of defense. Here are eight that can help restore and maintain your cells' sensitivity to insulin. 1. Turmeric: 100% Effective In Preventing Diabetes A 2009 study found curcumin, an active compound found in turmeric, was 500 to 100,000 times more effective than the prescription drug Metformin at activating glucose uptake.[i] In another study of 240 pre-diabetic adults, patients were given either 250 milligrams of curcumin or a placebo every day. After nine months, NONE of those taking curcumin developed diabetes but 16.4% of the placebo group did. In other words, the curcumin was 100% effective at preventing Type 2 diabetes. 2. Ginger: Lowers Fasting Blood Glucose by 10.5% In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 88 diabetics were divided into two groups. Every day one group received a placebo while the other received 3 one-gram capsules of ginger powder. After eight weeks, the ginger g Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance: An Actionable Guide

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance: An Actionable Guide

If you’ve been in the space of alternative health and wellness for a while, then you’ve likely heard the term ‘insulin resistance’ floating around. But if not, I’m going to do that right now so your brain can stop screeching to a halt every time it reads that word. What Does Insulin Do? Insulin is a hormone. To put it quite simply, you can think of hormones as “body messengers” that communicate and respond to everything from hunger signals to reproduction, to emotions and a heck of a lot more. Because we are an intelligent and integrated feedback loop, some hormones have more than one, and/or, overlapping functions. Insulin is produced in the pancreas (which is part of the endocrine system). Its major responsibility (which is uber important) is to help regulate blood sugar. When you eat foods that contain any form of sugar, that sugar gets broken down into glucose. By the way, when I say that foods containing sugar I’m not just talking about sweet foods. I’m also talking about any carbohydrate (both simple and complex) containing foods. In this case, flavor is secondary to chemical make-up because that’s what ultimately determines how it’s going to be digested. Let me give some examples of foods that will get broken down into glucose: Desserts: ice cream, cookies, cakes, pies, candy, dried fruit… Sweet drinks: gatorade, creamers, soda, koolaid, juices… Simple carbs: bread, pasta, crackers, cereals… Complex carbs: quinoa, oats, brown & wild rice, corn, sprouted wheats, plantains, cassava, turnips, squashes… Fiber-rich: most fruits, most vegetables, peas, beans, legumes Those foods, the ones above and the others I didn’t have space to include, once simplified into glucose molecules (this is what we mean when we say blood sugar) are then esc Continue reading >>

Weight Loss With Insulin Resistance: Diet Tips And Strategies

Weight Loss With Insulin Resistance: Diet Tips And Strategies

According to the World Health Organization, the prevalence of diabetes has risen significantly over the last 30-plus years. In 1980, just 4.7 percent of the world's population had diabetes, but by 2014 this figure had soared to 8.5 percent. This means approximately 422 million people were living with diabetes in 2014. These astounding statistics do not take into account the additional number of people with prediabetes or insulin resistance. In this article, we take a look at what insulin resistance is and what its relationship with body weight is. How might being overweight lead to insulin resistance and what can be done to lose weight? What is insulin resistance? Insulin resistance leads to a condition known as prediabetes, which means that a person's blood sugar level is high, but not high enough to qualify as diabetes. Having insulin resistance is a warning that, without intervention and effective lifestyle changes, someone with prediabetes may go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Sugar (glucose) is the body's main source of food energy. People obtain it from the food they eat. After food is broken down in the body, the sugar enters the bloodstream. In order to use it as energy, the body's cells need to "pick up" the sugar. Insulin, which is a hormone produced by the pancreas, helps this happen by moving the sugar out of the blood and enables it to enter the body's cells. Insulin maintains blood sugar levels, ensuring they are not too high or too low. However, when blood sugar levels are persistently high, the body's cells stop responding to insulin as effectively. This is known as insulin resistance. When insulin resistance occurs, sugar is unable to enter the cells as successfully, and too much remains in the bloodstream. Higher levels of sugar in the blood place a de Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What medical conditions are associated with insulin resistance? While the metabolic syndrome links insulin resistance with abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol, and high blood pressure; several other medical other conditions are specifically associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance may contribute to the following conditions: Type 2 Diabetes: Overt diabetes may be the first sign insulin resistance is present. Insulin resistance can be noted long before type 2 diabetes develops. Individuals reluctant or unable to see a health-care professional often seek medical attention when they have already developed type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Fatty liver: Fatty liver is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. Fatty liver associated with insulin resistance may be mild or severe. Newer evidence suggests fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver and, possibly, liver cancer. Arteriosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis (also known as atherosclerosis) is a process of progressive thickening and hardening of the walls of medium-sized and large arteries. Arteriosclerosis is responsible for: Other risk factors for arteriosclerosis include: High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol Diabetes mellitus from any cause Family history of arteriosclerosis Skin Lesions: Skin lesions include increased skin tags and a condition called acanthosis nigerians (AN). Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin, especially in folds such as the neck, under the arms, and in the groin. This condition is directly related to the insulin resistance, though the exact mechanism is not clear. Acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic condition strongly Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance

Reverse Insulin Resistance

Can you reverse insulin resistance or pre-diabetes? Much like type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance symptoms are caused purely by years of a refined-carbohydrate diet. It is estimated that 60 million Americans suffer from insulin resistance and most of them are undiagnosed: it is considered the most pervasive health problem in the US and almost nobody knows what it is. Through the combination of an insulin resistance diet and other lifestyle changes, a person can reverse his/her insulin resistance symptoms if they are caught in time. My patients speed up the unwinding process with the help of very specific insulin resistance supplements. Insulin Resistance Symptoms Are you sleepy after you eat? Do you feel like your brain works slower than it used to? Are you becoming more forgetful? Are you always cold even in warm weather? Are you still gaining weight no matter how much you exercise? Do diets no longer work? Are you female but growing a faint beard while starting to go bald? Are you a man who gains weight in the hips and are growing male breasts? Do you have very strong cravings for sweets even after eating? Does eating not relieve your hunger? Trying to reverse insulin resistance can get very complicated because it causes so many secondary conditions in the body. Metabolic Syndrome (Insulin Resistance) Symptoms And Other Complications: Stubborn weight gain Plaquing of the arteries Adrenal gland burnout Fatty liver Kidney damage Thyroid hormone disruption, causing thyroid issues Chronic whole-body inflammation, sometimes causing joint pains Circulation problems, including increased coagulability Sexual dysfunction and loss of sex drive in both sexes Skin tags or darkening of moles Official Diagnosis Of Metabolic Syndrome (Insulin Resistance) An official diagnosis of met Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Insulin Resistance

How To Avoid Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is a syndrome at the center of many chronic and serious health problems, including diabetes, obesity, heart disease and polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS. Insulin is one of the “major” hormones and it has a cascading effect on the rest of your hormones, including the “minor” hormones estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. Insulin resistance occurs because, for many of us, most of our calories come in the form of simple carbohydrates — sugars that quickly enter the bloodstream as glucose. The body has to release high levels of insulin to keep all that glucose in the bloodstream from spiraling out of control. Over time, the cells simply can’t keep up. They stop responding to the insulin signal and the body becomes “insulin resistant.” Now, the body is forced to release even more insulin because it cannot let blood sugar get too high. Having excess insulin in the bloodstream, or hyperinsulinemia, is a serious problem because the body can’t endure prolonged high levels of insulin. Too much insulin disrupts cellular metabolism and spreads inflammation. When your body is unable to keep blood glucose under control, it leads to diabetes, though that is only the most obvious disease caused by insulin resistance. Along the way, there are many other serious negative health effects that can happen before full-blown diabetes takes hold. Diabetes can then spiral into other health problems. You can stop this chain of events by making diet and lifestyle changes. You can start by understanding how insulin can get out of balance in the first place. How imbalanced insulin contributes to other hormonal imbalances Since insulin is considered a “major” hormone, it can affect many other hormone systems, including your “sex” hormones. A woman’s Continue reading >>

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