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Can You Mix Regular Insulin With Humulin N?

Is Mealtime Insulin Right For Me?

Is Mealtime Insulin Right For Me?

Diabetes & Insulin In diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or use it properly. This causes your blood sugar to go too high. Oral medications, like metformin, may help your body to use insulin more efficiently. Other oral medications can help your body make more insulin. However, these medicines often work for only a few years. When the oral medications stop working, you will need to give yourself background and/or mealtime insulin shots to help control your blood sugar. If you need insulin, it does not mean that you have failed. It is just a part of diabetes. Background insulin can help control your blood sugar when you are not eating. However, it does not cover the carbs that you eat at meals. If the dose of background insulin is raised to cover spikes in blood sugars that happen after you eat, your body will have too much insulin in between your meals and while you sleep. This can cause your blood sugar to go too low. This is called hypoglycemia. If you have high blood sugars after meals, this can cause tiredness, irritability, blurry vision, more frequent urination and thirst. Over time, high blood sugars can damage your feet, hands, and eyes. By adding mealtime insulin you can better match the insulin to what your body would produce if you did not have diabetes. This will help prevent both low and high blood sugars so that you feel better and get less damage from the diabetes. What is Insulin? Natural insulin is made from the pancreas to match what the body needs so your blood sugar stays in a normal range. The pancreas makes some amount of insulin all the time, called background or basal insulin. Background insulin helps to supply fuel to your muscles and controls the glucose that is released from your liver. Every time you eat, the pancreas releases a Continue reading >>

Buy Humulin N (nph Insulin) Vials Online

Buy Humulin N (nph Insulin) Vials Online

Humulin N (NPH Insulin) Vials 100 U/mL 10 mL QTY TYPE PRICE COST PER UNIT 1 10 ML $77.31 $77.31 2 10 ML $111.08 $55.54 3 10 ML $147.48 $49.16 4 10 ML $183.84 $45.96 5 10 ML $220.25 $44.05 6 10 ML $256.62 $42.77 7 10 ML $293.02 $41.86 8 10 ML $329.38 $41.17 9 10 ML $365.76 $40.64 10 10 ML $402.20 $40.22 VIEW ALL INSULIN PRODUCTS PLACE A NEW INSULIN ORDER What are Humulin N vials? Humulin N vials are vials filled with Humulin-N, which is the trade name of insulin isophane, otherwise known as NPH insulin, which is used to control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. It has been produced through genetic engineering, and is different from animal source insulin because it is structurally identical to the naturally occurring human insulin produced by your body. It is an intermediate-acting insulin with a slower onset of action than Regular insulin and a longer duration of activity. Humulin-N is a sterile suspension containing insulin isophane for subcutaneous (under the skin) injection. It is available in 10 mL vials. What is it used for? Humulin N is an intermediate-acting insulin administered subcutaneously (under the skin) that is used for the treatment of insulin requiring diabetic patients. How does it work? Humulin N is the brand name of insulin isophane, or NPH insulin. This type of insulin is an intermediate-acting insulin, which is sometimes called basal, or background insulin, because it provides a long duration of insulin protection against your blood sugar level fluctuations throughout the entire day. After subcutaneous (under the skin) injection once or twice a day it typically begins to work in 90 minutes and lasts for approximately 24 hours. Humulin-N is structurally identical to naturally occurring human insulin, but it is mixed small proteins called pro Continue reading >>

Preferred Step Therapy Policy

Preferred Step Therapy Policy

Insulin (Other) Preferred Medications  Humulin® N (NPH, human insulin isophane suspension [recombinant DNA origin] injection [vials, pen, and KwikPen])  Humulin® R (Regular insulin human injection, USP [rDNA origin] U-100 only [vials])  Humulin ® 70/30 (70% NPH, human insulin isophane suspension and 30% regular, human insulin injection [recombinant DNA origin] [vials, pen, and KwikPen]) Non-Preferred Medications  Novolin® N (NPH, human insulin isophane suspension [recombinant DNA origin] injection [vials])  Novolin® R (Regular, human insulin injection [recombinant DNA origin] solution for subcutaneous or intravenous use)  Novolin® 70/30 (70% NPH, human insulin isophane suspension and 30% regular, human insulin injection [recombinant DNA origin]) OVERVIEW Insulin is an anabolic and anticatabolic hormone and plays a major role in protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism. Humulin and Novolin are lines of human insulin indicated for to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. These products substitute for inadequate endogenous insulin secretion and partially correct the disordered metabolism and inappropriate hyperglycemia of diabetes mellitus, which are caused by either a deficiency or reduction in the biologic effectiveness of insulin. POLICY STATEMENT This step therapy program encourages the use of Humulin products prior to the use of Novolin products. If the preferred step therapy rule is not met for a non-preferred agent at the point of service, coverage will be determined by the preferred step therapy criteria below. All approvals are provided for 1 year in duration. Automation: Patients 18 years of age and older will be targeted in this preferred step therapy program. Regular Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin - Topic Overview

Types Of Insulin - Topic Overview

Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulin Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting Apidra (insulin glulisine) Clear 5-15 minutes 30-60 minutes 3-5 hours Humalog (insulin lispro) Clear 5-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 3-5 hours NovoLog (insulin aspart) Clear 5-15 minutes 40-50 minutes 3-5 hours Afrezza (insulin human, inhaled) Contained in a cartridge 10-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 2½-3 hours Short-acting Humulin R, Novolin R (insulin regular) Clear 30 minutes 1½-2 hours 6-8 hours Intermediate-acting Humulin N, Novolin N (insulin NPH) Cloudy 1-4 hours 4-12 hours 14-24 hours Long-acting Lantus (insulin glargine) Clear 1-2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Levemir (insulin detemir) Clear 2 hours Minimal peak Up to 24 hours Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by the human pancreas. It quickly Continue reading >>

Using Your Kwikpen

Using Your Kwikpen

Humalog (insulin lispro) Humulin N (NPH insulin) Humalog Mix 75/25 (75% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 25% insulin lispro) Humalog Mix 50/50 (50% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 50% insulin lispro) Humulin Mix 70/30 (70% NPH insulin and 30% regular insulin) Storing your pens Store your pens in the refrigerator until you use them. You can keep a pen at room temperature after your first use. On first use, write on the pen the date the pen will no longer be safe to use. See the chart below to find how long your pen is good. After that date, throw the pen away even if it still has insulin in it. Type of Insulin You may use your pen for... Humalog Mix 75/25 10 days Humalog Mix 50/50 10 days Humulin Mix 70/30 10 days Humulin N 14 days Humalog 28 days Get your pen ready (before first use only): Wash and dry your hands well. Remove the pen cap. Humalog: Look at the window to make sure the liquid is clear and has no color or specks. Do not use the pen if it is not clear, has a color or you can see specks in it. It is normal to see air bubbles. Humalog Mix, Humulin Mix and Humulin N: Gently roll the pen ten times between your hands. Then gently move the pen up and down ten times (do not shake). Do this until your insulin looks white and cloudy with no clumps. Remove the seal from the new pen needle and carefully screw it onto the end of the pen. Remove the outer needle cap and set it aside. Remove the inner needle cap and throw it away. Turn the knob on the pen to dial up a dose of 2 units. Hold the pen with the needle pointing straight up. Gently tap the side of the pen to get rid of any air bubbles. Push the injection button until you see 0 (zero) in the dose window. You should see a drop of liquid at the end of the needle. This means your pen is ready to use. Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

There are many types of insulin. All insulins help sugar to get inside the cell, but they are not all the same. Each type may be different in how fast it takes to start working. Each type may be different in howfast it takes to start working, how long it takes to control blood sugar, and how long it lasts in the body. These differences are important to know when learning about insulin so you will use your insulin in the right way. • Onset: the length of time after injection that insulin begins to work • Peak: the length of time after injection that the insulin takes to reach its maximum effect • Duration: the length of time that the insulin continues to work inside the body Three major drug companies manufacture insulin in the United States. These are Sanofi-aventis, Eli Lilly, and Novo Nordisk. Types of insulin available in the United States Rapid-Acting: Administer within 15 minutes before a meal or eat within 5-15 minutes after injection. Generic Name Brand Name Concentration Manufacturer insulin aspart NovoLOG 100 units/mL Novo Nordisk insulin glulisine APIDRA 100 units/mL Sanofi-aventis insulin lispro HumaLOG 100 units/mL Eli Lilly insulin lispro (U-200) HumaLOG KwikPen U-2001 200 units/mL Eli Lilly insulin (oral inhalation) AFREZZA Available in single-use cartridges of 4 units, 8 Units and 12 Units Sanofi-aventis Short-Acting: Takes effect within 30 minutes. The max effect is between 2.5 hours-5 hours. The duration is approximately 8 hours. Generic Name Brand Name Concentration Manufacturer insulin regular HumuLIN R2 100 units/mL Eli Lilly insulin regular NovoLIN R2 100 units/mL Novo Nordisk insulin regular (U-500) HumuLIN R U-500 Concentrated2,3 500 units/mL Eli Lilly Intermediate-Acting: Takes effect with 90 minutes of injection. The greatest blood sugar l Continue reading >>

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful because the needles are short and thin and the insulin shots are placed into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. In some cases, the doctor prescribes a mixed dose of insulin. This means taking more than one type of insulin at the same time. A mixed dose allows you to have the benefits of both short-acting insulin along with a longer acting insulin — without having to give 2 separate shots. Usually, one of the insulins will be cloudy and the other clear. Some insulins cannot be mixed in the same syringe. For instance, never mix Lantus or Levemir with any other solution. Be sure to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or diabetes educator before mixing. These instructions explain how to mix two different types of insulin into one shot. If you are giving or getting just one type of insulin, refer to the patient education sheet Insulin: How to Give a Shot. What You Will Need Bottles of insulin Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Syringe with needle (You will need a prescription to buy syringes from a pharmacy. Check with your pharmacist to be sure the syringe size you are using is correct for your total dose of insulin.) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of a Syringe and Needle You will use a syringe and needle to give the shot. The parts are labeled below. Wash the work area (where you will set the insulin and syringe) well with soap and water. Wash your hands. Check the drug labels to be sure they are what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date o Continue reading >>

What Should Be Considered When Selecting Insulin Or Another Injectable Diabetes Product From The Fridge?

What Should Be Considered When Selecting Insulin Or Another Injectable Diabetes Product From The Fridge?

Detail-Document; 280316 Insulins differ from each other in regard to source (e.g., human, human insulin analog, pork [Canada only]) and duration of action (e.g., rapid-, short-, intermediate-, or long-acting). Human insulin does not actually come from humans; it is genetically engineered, but it is identical to the insulin produced by the human pancreas. Human insulin analogs are human insulin that has been modified to make the insulin act more quickly for use around mealtimes (e.g., Humalog, Apidra) or last longer (e.g., Levemir, Lantus). Mixtures of short- and longer-acting insulins are also available to reduce the number of injections for patients requiring both shorter- and longer-acting insulins. For example, Humulin 70/30 is 70% NPH (an intermediate-acting insulin) and 30% regular insulin (a short-acting insulin). It's a good idea to use separate bins or shelf alerts to distinguish among products that look similar. For example, Lantus and Apidra vials are both manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis and have similar packaging that has contributed to mix-ups with these products. Insulin most commonly comes in a concentration of 100 units per mL. This strength is referred to as U-100. Vials contain 10 mL, or 1000 units (100 units/mL x 10 mL/vial = 1000 units). A 500 unit per mL Humulin R (referred to as U-500) is available by prescription in the U.S. for people requiring large doses. If this very concentrated insulin is available in your pharmacy, it should be kept in a special place in the fridge to avoid mix-ups. Mistakenly dispensing 500 units per mL Humulin R in place of the 100 units per mL strength could result in a five-fold overdose. The patient's blood sugar could plummet, which could be fatal. Another uncommon insulin is pork insulin (Canada only). Some insulins ar Continue reading >>

Humulin-n

Humulin-n

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. NPH is an intermediate-acting insulin. It takes 1 to 3 hours to begin working after injection, reaches its maximum effect between 5 and 8 hours, and stops working after about 18 to 24 hours. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Vial Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, glycerol, m-cresol, phenol, protamine sulfate, and zinc. May contain dimethicone, hydrochloric acid, and sodium hydroxide. Cartridge/KwikPen Each mL contains 100 units of NPH insulin. Nonmedicinal ingredients: dibasic sodium phosphate, Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Make sure you have the type (beef and pork, pork, or human) and the strength of insulin that your doctor ordered for you. You may find that keeping an insulin label with you is helpful when buying insulin supplies. The concentration (strength) of insulin is measured in USP Insulin Units and USP Insulin Human Units and is usually expressed in terms such as U-100 insulin. Insulin doses are measured and injected with specially marked insulin syringes. The appropriate syringe is chosen based on your insulin dose to make measuring the dose easy to read. This helps you measure your dose accurately. These syringes come in three sizes: 3/10 cubic centimeters (cc) measuring up to 30 USP Units of insulin, ½ cc measuring up to 50 USP Units of insulin, and 1 cc measuring up to 100 USP Units of insulin. It is important to follow any instructions from your doctor about the careful selection and rotation of injection sites on your body. There are several important steps that will help you successfully prepare your insulin injection. To draw the insulin up into the syringe correctly, you need to follow these steps: Wash your hands with soap and water. If your insulin contains zinc or isophane (normally cloudy), be sure that it is completely mixed. Mix the insulin by slowly rolling the bottle between your hands or gently tipping the bottle over a few times. Never shake the bottle vigorously (hard). Do not use the insulin if it looks lumpy or grainy, seems unusually thick, sticks to the bottle, or seems to be even a little discolored. Do not use the insulin if it contains crystals or if the bottle looks frosted. Regular insulin (short-acting) should be used only if it is clear and colorless. Remove the colored protective cap on the bottle. Do not Continue reading >>

Understanding R, N, And Premixed Insulins

Understanding R, N, And Premixed Insulins

Share: Sometimes due to choice, cost, insurance coverage you may find yourself on N, R, or pre-mixed insulin. The following is some information to understand what the types are, how they are taken, and who might be taking them. What is R insulin and when should I take it? Regular or R insulin is clear in color, considered short acting, and is available in names including: Humulin R, Novolin R, ReliOn R. This insulin starts working in 30 minutes and lasts for about 5-8 hours. Regular insulin is taken 30 minutes before meals. It helps to provide coverage for your meals. If you use in combination with N insulin, you would take it before breakfast and dinner. If skipping a meal, you would skip your R insulin. How much is R insulin? R insulin is considerably cheaper than rapid acting analogs such as Humalog or Novolog. Check with your pharmacy for exact pricing. What is N insulin and when should I take it? NPH (N) is a cloudy colored, intermediate acting insulin, and is available as Humulin N, Novolin N, ReliOn N. It starts working in about 1-3 hours, and can last for approximately 10-18 hours. N insulin helps to cover in between your meals and the N you take at breakfast will still be working at lunch to cover your meal. It is essential that you have lunch every day, about 4-5 hours after you inject your N at breakfast. If you do not have lunch, you will be at risk for going too low. The N you take at bed will work during the night to help regular your morning glucose levels. You should have a small bed time snack. NPH or N insulin would be taken with breakfast and before bed for better fasting glucose levels, however instead of giving it at bed, it may be given before dinner also. How much is N insulin? N insulin is a cheaper alternative to longer acting insulins. Check wi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management

Diabetes Management

There are four main types of insulin, as well as insulin combination medications. The four main types are: Insulin was once obtained exclusively from pig or cow pancreas. Today, regular and intermediate-acting insulins are referred to as human insulins, because they are manufactured to be identical to the insulin produced by the human pancreas. Rapid- and long-acting insulins are chemically modified forms of human insulin. Most individuals need to use more than one type of insulin, so they either mix two types of insulin together or buy prepared (premixed) insulin mixtures. The insulin types differ in three ways: Onset—the length of time it takes for the insulin to reach the bloodstream and begin lowering blood glucose. Peak activity—the period of time during which insulin has its maximum effect in lowering blood glucose. Duration—the amount of time the insulin continues to lower blood glucose. Regular or short-acting insulin This type of insulin is manufactured to be similar to the insulin produced in the human body. Popular brands have an "R" (for regular) in their names, for example, Humulin R and Novolin R. Regular insulin is typically injected 30–60 minutes before meals and usually reaches the bloodstream within 30 minutes, in time to cover the rise in blood glucose that begins after food is eaten. Insulin action peaks one and a half to two hours after injection and the effects last about eight to 10 hours. Rapid-acting insulin Insulin aspart (Novolog), insulin lispro (Humalog), and insulin glulisine (Apidra) are called insulin analogues, because their chemical structure is a modified form of human insulin that is designed to work more quickly and peak faster than regular insulin. These manufactured insulins are safer to use because they work more closely t Continue reading >>

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Humulin N (nph, Human Insulin Isophane (rdna Origin)) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Intermediate-acting Human Insulins and Analogs Intermediate-acting insulin with a longer onset and duration of activity when compared to regular insulin; hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein; usually requires >= 2 injections/day when used as a basal insulin. Humulin N/Novolin N Subcutaneous Inj Susp: 1mL, 100U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus or for type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately managed by diet, exercise, and oral hypoglycemics. NOTE: A consensus algorithm issued by the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes lists basal or intermediate-acting insulin as a second line or third line agent in patients with type 2 diabetes not controlled on oral drugs; metformin is the initial recommended therapy in all type 2 diabetics without contraindications. Once insulin is added, therapy can be intensified (e.g., addition of prandial insulin) to achieve optimal glycemic control. In patients who are receiving a sulfonylurea, the sulfonylurea should be discontinued when insulin therapy is initiated. The total daily dose is given as 1 to 2 injections per day, given 30 to 60 minutes before a meal or bedtime. Some patients may initially be given a single daily dose 30 to 60 minutes before breakfast, but 24-hour blood glucose control may not be possible with this regimen. Thus, a second injection given 30 to 60 minutes before dinner or bedtime may be required. When oral agents are used concomitantly in type 2 DM, a low initial dose of NPH insulin (e.g., 10 units) is often given in the evening. When used for intensive insulin therapy, NPH insulin is frequently mixed with a quick-acting insulin and given twice daily, although some patients w Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Insulin Nph (otc)

Insulin Nph (otc)

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Suggested guidelines for beginning dose: 0.2 unit/kg/day Dosing Considerations Dosage of human insulin, which is always expressed in USP units, must be based on the results of blood and urine glucose tests and must be carefully individualized to optimal effect Dose adjustments should be based on regular blood glucose testing Adjust to achieve appropriate glucose control Blood sugar patterns (>3 days) Look for consistent pattern in blood sugars for >3 days For the same time each day: Compare blood glucose level For each time of day: Calculate blood glucose range Calculate median blood glucose Consider eating and activity patterns during day Blood glucose adjustments Adjust only 1 insulin dose at a time Correct hypoglycemia first Correct highest blood sugars next If all blood sugars are high (within 2.75 mmol/L [50 mg/dL]): Correct morning fasting blood glucose first Change insulin doses in small increments: Type 1 diabetes (1-2 unit change); type 2 diabetes (2-3 unit change) Many sliding scales exist to determine exact insulin dose based on frequent blood glucose monitoring Commonly written for q4hr blood glucose test Sliding scale coverage usually begins after blood glucose >11 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) If coverage is needed q4hr x 24 hr, then base insulin dose is adjusted first; sliding scale doses may be adjusted upwards as well Continue reading >>

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