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Can You Mix Lantus And Regular Insulin In The Same Syringe

Nph And Regular Insulin Mixing

Nph And Regular Insulin Mixing

Effects, and cautions. NPH insulin may be premixed with Regular insulin without changing the. Insulin Administration Complications. NPH and Regular insulin are. NPH insulin, like regular. Physician reviewed insulin isophane and insulin regular patient information. Nph and regular insulin mixing includes insulin isophane and insulin regular description, dosage and directions. Three insulin preparations that can be classified as long. When This Medicine Should Not Be Used. Do not use it if you had an allergic reaction to any insulin. PH is maintained and crystals form. Mixtures stable in syringe at room temp for. This medicine is not right for everyone. Draw regular insulin into syringe first. Preliminary evidence shows mixing glargine with. NPH insulin is made by mixing regular insulin and protamine in exact proportions with zinc and phenol such that a neutral. Source of information for nurses all over the world. Acting are currently available commercially. Free Online Review for Nurses. Mixing NPH and Regular Insulin. Accuracy than those mixed by. Learn about Novolin 70. NPH plus regular insulin in same syringe. May treat, uses, dosage, side effects, drug. What Type of Insulin. Is Best for My Diabetes. Novolin n nph, human insulin. Insulin Isophane Suspension and 30. Regular, Human Insulin Injection. Step directions for giving a mixed dose of insulin to people with. Keep your eating habits and exercise regular. Humalog can be mixed with insulin. Regular, Lantus, Levemir. Special care should be taken when the transfer is from a standard beef or mixed species insulin to a. NPH insulin may be mixed with other faster acting insulin like regular insulin so that it can control better the levels of blood sugar. Mixing of NPH insulin by a mechanical device showed that at least Continue reading >>

Early Pharmacokinetic And Pharmacodynamic Effects Of Mixing Lispro With Glargine Insulin

Early Pharmacokinetic And Pharmacodynamic Effects Of Mixing Lispro With Glargine Insulin

Go to: Clinicians who treat children with type 1 diabetes often try to minimize the number of daily injections to reduce treatment burden and improve compliance. Despite the manufacturer's cautions against mixing glargine with rapid-acting insulin analogs, clinical studies have failed to demonstrate deleterious effects of mixing on glucose excursions or A1C levels. However, no formal glucose clamp studies have been performed to determine whether mixing with glargine has an adverse effect on the early pharmacodynamic action of rapid-acting insulin in humans. To examine this question, euglycemic glucose clamps were performed twice, in random order, in 11 youth with type 1 diabetes (age 15.1 ± 3 years, A1C 7.6 ± 0.6%) with 0.2 units/kg lispro and 0.4 units/kg glargine, given either as separate or as a single mixed injection. Mixing the two insulins shifted the time action curve to the right, with significantly lower glucose infusion rate (GIR) values after the mixed injections between 60 and 190 min and significantly higher values between 270 and 300 min, lowered the GIRmax (separate 7.1 ± 1 vs. mix 3.9 ± 1, P = 0.03), and markedly delayed the time to reach GIRmax (separate 116 ± 8 min vs. mix 209 ± 15 min, P = 0.004). The GIR area under the curve was significantly lower after the mixed injections. Mixing had similar effects on plasma insulin pharmacokinetics. These data demonstrate that mixing lispro with glargine markedly flattens the early pharmacodynamic peak of lispro and causes a shift to the right in the GIR curve changes that might lead to difficulties in controlling meal-related glucose excursions. Pharmacokinetic profiles. Insulin concentration, measured by ELISA with a reported cross-reactivity of 44% for insulin glargine, for separate and mixed injections Continue reading >>

Download Subtitles And Closed Captions (cc) From Youtube

Download Subtitles And Closed Captions (cc) From Youtube

Enter the URL of the YouTube video to download subtitles in many different formats and languages. How to Mix Insulin NPH and Regular Insulin Nursing Mixing Insulin Clear to Cloudy with English subtitles or ? Complain hey everyone its ears red sterner saurian calm and in this video I'm going to be going over how to mix insulin what I'm going to do for you is that I'm going to actually show you how to draw up insulin whenever you're mixing it but first let me go over the most important concepts that you need to know whenever performing this nursing skill so what is the purpose of mixing insulin well the purpose is is that it helps prevent from having to give the patient two injections because a lot of times physicians will order two different types of insulin and you can just mix them in the syringe and give them one injection so it is better for the patient now in this video what I want to be going over are the most commonly ordered influence that you mix which generally are in pH which is an intermediate insulin and regular insulin which is a short-acting insulin now before we get started let's go over these key concepts that you need to remember number one never mix lantus which is a long-acting insulin with any other type of insulin it's to go all by itself so you will never mix it with anything number two after drawing up the insulin into your syringe administer the dose within 5 to 15 minutes because regular insulin binds to mph and it will decrease its action number three before administering insulin always check the patient for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia so you want to look at the patient you want to ask them how they're feeling because typical signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia is that the patient's sweaty clammy tachycardic confused and a lot of times pa Continue reading >>

Store Insulin According To The Manufacturer's Instructions.

Store Insulin According To The Manufacturer's Instructions.

For insulin therapy to be safe and effective, patient adherence to specific preparation and injection routines is required. Patient education should include product specific storage, injection technique, accurate dosages, and site rotation. Check storage guidelines specific to the insulin formulation. (usually in the product package insert). When ordering insulin through the mail, verify that the insulin will be shipped under proper conditions. Never freeze insulin. (Frozen insulin should be thrown away.) Never use insulin beyond the expiration date stamped by the drug manufacturer on the vial, pen, or cartridge. Avoid exposing insulin to direct heat, light or excessive agitation. The longer the exposure to extremes, the less effective the insulin becomes. Unopened, not-in-use insulin should be stored in a refrigerator at a temperature of 36-46o F and should retain potency until the expiration date. Opened, in-use insulin should be stored at room temperature 59-86o F for up to 28 days. Pre-filling and storage of insulin syringes by patients is not recommended by some insulin manufacturers (check the product insert label) If allowed, store syringes with the needle pointing up to avoid obstruction of needle lumen. One study indicated that the qualities of the disposable syringe significantly effected the stability and efficacy of Lantus® insulin over a seven day period.• Examine vials of liquid insulin for sediment or other visible changes. Regular insulin, lispro, aspart, and glargine are clear insulins. All other types of insulin are suspensions with a milky appearance. A clear insulin preparation that becomes cloudy or discolored or an insulin suspension that shows clumping or has a frosty appearance indicates that the insulin may be contaminated or has lost potency Continue reading >>

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

Learn how to mix insulin clear to cloudy. Drawing up and mixing insulin is a skill that nurses will utilize on the job. Insulin is administered to patients who have diabetes . These type of patientsdepend on insulin so their body can use glucose. Therefore, nurses must be familiar with how to mix insulin. The goal of this article is to teach you how to mix insulin. Below are a video demonstration and step-by-step instructions on how to do this. Purpose of mixing insulin: To prevent having to give the patient two separate injections (hence better for the patient). Most commonly ordered insulin that are mixed: NPH (intermediate-acting) and Regular insulin (short-acting). Never mix Insulin Glargine Lantus with any other type of insulin. Administer the dose within 5 to 10 minutes after drawing up because the regular insulin binds to the NPH and this decreases its action. Check the patients blood sugar and for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia to ensure they arent hypoglycemic if patient is hypoglycemic hold the dose and notify md for further orders. Key Concept for Mixing Insulin: Draw up CLEAR TO CLOUDY Remember the mnemonic: RN (Regular to Nph) Why? It prevents contaminating the vial of clear insulin with the cloudy insulin because if contaminated it can affect the action of the insulin. Why does this matter because they will be mixed in the syringe? You have 5 to 10 minutes to give the insulin mixed in the syringe before the action of the insulins are affected Demonstration on Drawing Up Clear to Cloudy Insulin 1. Check the doctors order and that you have the correct medication: Doctors order says: 10 units of Humulin R and 12 units of Humulin N subcutaneous before breakfast daily Youre giving a total of 22 units (10 Regular & 12 NPH) As the nurse, it is important to k Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Topic Overview Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. The table below is a general guide. Your results may be different. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one milliliter of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulin Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by the human pancreas. It quickly drops the blood sugar level and works for a short time. If a rapid-acting insulin is used instead of a short-acting insulin at the start of dinner, it may prevent severe drops in blood sugar level in the middle of the night. Apidra (glulisine), Humalog (lispro), Novolog (aspart) Clear 5-30 minutes 30 minutes-3 hours 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin also comes in a form that can be inhaled through the mouth. Afrezza (insulin human, inhaled) Contained in a cartridge 10-15 minutes 30-90 minutes 2½-3 hours Short-acting insulins take effect and wear off more quickly tha Continue reading >>

Mixing Insulin

Mixing Insulin

License Here How Do You Mix Insulin? Your doctor or diabetes educator may ask you to mix a short-acting or clear insulin with an intermediate or long acting cloudy insulin in the same syringe so that both can be given at the same time. Keep in mind: The only insulin that cannot be mixed is insulin Glargine. Mixing Insulin In this example, the doctor has asked you to mix 10 units of regular, clear, insulin with 15 units of NPH cloudy insulin, to a total combined dose of 25 units. Always, draw “clear before cloudy” insulin into the syringe. This is to prevent cloudy insulin from entering the clear insulin bottle. Always do this procedure in the correct order, as shown in the following sequence. Roll the bottle of the cloudy insulin between your hands to mix it. Clean both bottle tops with an alcohol wipe. Pull back the plunger of the syringe to the dose of the long-acting (cloudy) insulin in this example 15 units. You now have 15 units of air in the syringe. Check the insulin bottle to ensure you have the correct cloudy type of insulin. With the insulin bottle held firmly on a counter or tabletop, insert the needle through the rubber cap into the bottle. Push the plunger down so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle. Remove the needle and syringe. This primes the bottle for when you withdraw the insulin later. Pull back the plunger of the syringe to the dose of the shorter acting clear insulin in this example 10 units. You now have 10 units of air in the syringe. Check the insulin bottle to ensure you have the correct clear type of insulin. With the insulin bottle held firmly on a counter or tabletop, insert the needle through the rubber cap into the bottle. Push the plunger down so that the air goes from the syringe into the bottle. Turn the bottle upsid Continue reading >>

Mixing Levemir Or Lantus With Humalog

Mixing Levemir Or Lantus With Humalog

Why can't Lantus or Levemir be mixed with humalog to avoid taking 2 injections? I found an old thread which answered the question. Blondie and Jill answered this one. PH issues that make the insulins unstable. Thanks. I promise to always search archives first. The pH of Lantus is approximately 4.0. Most other insulin injections run a pH around 7.2 to 7.7. Mixing lantus with novolog, nph, etc offsets the pKa of lantus making the duration (18-23 hours) variable and unstable. BTW According to my recent reading of the early chapters of "Think Like a Pancreas", there would be no problem with mixing Levemir with Humalog, Lantus on the other hand cannot be mixed with any other insulin. Hope the book and my memory are right!! Well, theoretically, Lantus changes consistency at higher pH levels, becoming thicker, which can interfere with the absorption of both insulins. Like many theories, however, this one is at odds with reality. I've mixed Lantus with Humalog and with Regular, and all insulins acted as they would if they were injected separately. I was afraid to try the experiment, but gained courage after hearing from several parents of young diabetic kids who had all done it successfully. I doubt it's successful across the board, though, or Sanofi-Aventis would be crowing about it from every rooftop. If you are needle-phobic, though, it would definitely be worth a try. (Back in the old days, when I ran out of Regular one time, I drew up some of the clear insulin from a bottle of NPH that had settled until the solids and liquid were separated, thinking that the clear insulin on top would act like Regular.... nope, it acted like NPH all the way). Well, theoretically, Lantus changes consistency at higher pH levels, becoming thicker, which can interfere with the absorption of b Continue reading >>

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful because the needles are short and thin and the insulin shots are placed into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. In some cases, the doctor prescribes a mixed dose of insulin. This means taking more than one type of insulin at the same time. A mixed dose allows you to have the benefits of both short-acting insulin along with a longer acting insulin — without having to give 2 separate shots. Usually, one of the insulins will be cloudy and the other clear. Some insulins cannot be mixed in the same syringe. For instance, never mix Lantus or Levemir with any other solution. Be sure to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or diabetes educator before mixing. These instructions explain how to mix two different types of insulin into one shot. If you are giving or getting just one type of insulin, refer to the patient education sheet Insulin: How to Give a Shot. What You Will Need Bottles of insulin Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Syringe with needle (You will need a prescription to buy syringes from a pharmacy. Check with your pharmacist to be sure the syringe size you are using is correct for your total dose of insulin.) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of a Syringe and Needle You will use a syringe and needle to give the shot. The parts are labeled below. Wash the work area (where you will set the insulin and syringe) well with soap and water. Wash your hands. Check the drug labels to be sure they are what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date o Continue reading >>

Effects Of Mixing Glargine And Short-acting Insulin Analogs On Glucose Control

Effects Of Mixing Glargine And Short-acting Insulin Analogs On Glucose Control

Intensive insulin management improves glycemic control and lowers the risks of long-term microvascular complications (1). Several new insulin analogs (2) are in use to improve glycemic control in type 1 diabetes. Glargine in particular is a “basal insulin” (3) and found to be relatively peakless. Glargine is thought to provide glucose profiles similar to insulin pumps (4). Although some clinical studies suggest that glargine lasts 24 h in children with diabetes (5), to date there have been no formal pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data to make that claim in the pediatric population. In fact, clinical observations in pediatric type 1 diabetes suggest that glargine action may be <24 h. This would entail twice-daily glargine dosing and short-acting insulin analogs (SAIs), such as lispro and aspart, given separately three to four times per day, resulting in improved glycemic control but compromising compliance and increasing complexity of management (6). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that mixing glargine with SAIs and dividing the dose of glargine into twice- versus once-daily dosing would not adversely affect glycemic control as assessed by a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The protocol was approved by the institutional review board of the Baylor College of Medicine, and consent was obtained before each study. Subjects were recruited from Texas Children’s Hospital Diabetes Care Center, Houston, Texas. Subjects had type 1 diabetes for at least 1 year with no other chronic illness and were on no additional medications (except for insulin and synthroid for hypothyroidism). All subjects were using insulin glargine as a once- daily injection at bedtime or before supper or breakfast, with three or more injections of SA Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications – Humalog

High-alert Medications – Humalog

Insulin lispro suspension must be gently shaken or rolled between your hands to mix before use. Mixing Two Insulins Since your doctor has ordered 2 kinds of insulin that can be mixed, you need to learn how to mix the two insulins together in one syringe. Lispro is the same thing as Humalong or Novalog. LANTUS must not be diluted or mixed with any. This type of insulin should be gently mixed before use. NPH insulin and PZI insulin may be mixed only with regu Mixing Insulins: 10 Units of Regular and 20 Units of NPH C Withdrawing regular insulin. As long as you are still being conscious of your administration times (a fast acting insulin should always be given before eating), there’s nothing wrong with. Can Humalog and Humulin N be mixed in the same syringe without compromising either medication. This way you can give yourself one injection or shot instead of two. Good luck let us know how you’re doing HighAlert Medications Humalog (insulin lispro) But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake Humalog can be mixed with insulin NPH. Why can’t Lantus or Levemir be mixed with Mixing Levemir or lantus with humalog I drew up some of the clear insulin from a bottle of NPH that. If the results are good and if you can afford the additional syringes, it is often a good treatment plan. Insulin lispro in vials or cartridges also can be used with an external insulin pump. Insulin lispro LANTUS NPH LANTUS labeling. Some insulins, like glargine (Lantus) and detemer (Levemir), cannot be mixed. A potential disadvantage to Lantus is that it CANNOT be mixed in a syringe with short acting insulin. Other insulins are cloudy and white (for instance, NPH, 7525, 7030, and 5050). To do this, roll the vial between your hands. This characteristic requires taht folks take more shot Continue reading >>

Can Lantus And Regular Insulin Be Taken Together?

Can Lantus And Regular Insulin Be Taken Together?

Community Answers Lantus is a sterile solution of insulin glargine that is used in injection form. The main thing that makes Lantus stand out from other insulins is that is long-acting with a duration of up to 24 hours. Regular insulin tends to be more short lived and is better used for controlling spikes in your blood sugar levels. While you are taking Lantus it is perfectly safe to use regular insulin to control spikes in your blood sugar. However as with any other medication be sure to consult your doctor before mixing drugs. Too much insulin can cause an unsafe drop in BG levels. It is important to follow your prescribed dosing schedule to ensure you maintain the proper insulin levels. I want to add to that last part , although insulin may be taken " together," as in you may take the long lasting Lantus Insulin and then LATER, when your blood sugar spikes, (usually after meals) you may take Regular insulin and Inject the insulin in a different area. Ex: If giving a subcutaneous injection in the stomach works for you, give the second injection in another part of the stomach. The reason for this is because different parts of your body will absorb the insulin differently.For instance the absorption rate injected in to your arm would be different the the absorption rate in your thigh. So, you may take Insulin Lantus and Regular Insulin "together," However, you can not put Insulin regular and insulin Lantus in the same syringe and give it in one dose. Simplified: You will have 2 insulin's and 2 injections. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Insulin Treatment, Type 1

Diabetes: Insulin Treatment, Type 1

Type 1 Diabetes: Insulin Treatment Your child has Type I Insulin Dependent Diabetes. This type of diabetes happens when the body does not make enough insulin. Because the body needs insulin to stay healthy, your child must take insulin each day by injection to meet the body's needs to control blood sugars. Supplies you will need: Insulin Insulin syringe Alcohol swab or 70% alcohol and cotten ball Note:Insulin syringes come in four types - 25, 30, 50 and 100 units. On a 25-unit syringe, each line equals ½ unit. On the 30 and 50-unit syringe, each line equals 1 unit. On the 100-unit syringe, each line equals 2 units. Opened vials of insulin, cartridges or pens in current use do not need to be refrigerated if used within 30 days of their first use. Refrigerated and unopened vials or pens can last up to the expiration date on the box or vial. The injection hurts less if the insulin is allowed to come to room temperature before injecting. You may warm the insulin syringe by rolling the syringe between your hands before injecting. Label the bottle with the date when it is opened. The bottle or pen must be thrown away once it has been opened for 30 days (whether it has been refrigerated or is at room temperature). Levemir should be thrown away after 42 days. Drawing up your insulin Single Dose: Wash your hands. Check the insulin bottle before using it. Make sure that the expiration date has not passed and that the top of the bottle is not damaged. Make sure clear insulin stays clear and cloudy insulin is white, not clumpy. Lantus and Levemir are clear, long-acting insulins. Your doctor may give permission/orders allowing you to mix Lantus or Levemir with your short or rapid-acting insulin. Do not mix either of these insulins with any other insulin without first discussing thi Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

Diabetes In Children: Giving Insulin Shots To A Child

Introduction If your child doesn't want to feel the insulin needle, your child's doctor can prescribe an indwelling subcutaneous cannula. A small needle is used to insert a soft tube into a place where you give your child an insulin shot, such as the belly. The needle is taken out, but the soft tube (cannula) stays in your child's body and is held in place with tape. Then, when your child needs insulin, the insulin needle is put into the cannula instead of into the skin. This way, your child won't have to feel the insulin needle. The cannula can be used for at least 3 days before your child will need a new one. The three most important elements of success in giving insulin injections include: Making sure you have the right dose of insulin, especially if you are giving two types of insulin in the same syringe. Practicing how to give an injection. Storing insulin properly so that each dose will work effectively. How is insulin prepared and given? Your doctor or certified diabetes educator (CDE) will help you and your child learn to prepare and give insulin injections. If your child is age 10 or older, he or she may be able to give insulin with supervision. Here are some simple steps to help you and your child learn this task. To get ready to give an insulin injection using an insulin vial and insulin syringe or an insulin pen, follow these steps. Wash your hands with soap and running water. Dry them thoroughly. If your child is going to help, wash his or her hands well. Gather the supplies. Keep the supplies in a bag or kit so your child can carry the supplies wherever he or she goes. Check the insulin bottle or cartridge. When an insulin vial is used for the first time, write the date on the bottle. Insulin stored at room temperature will last for about a month. Read and Continue reading >>

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