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Can You Mix Lantus And Novolog In The Same Syringe?

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

High-alert Medications - Novolog (insulin Aspart)

Extra care is needed because NovoLog is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for NovoLog When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. NovoLog is a rapid-acting form of insulin that should be injected below the skin 5 to 10 minutes before meals. Have food ready before injection. After injecting the insulin, do not skip a meal or delay eating. 2. Prepare your insulin. An intermediate- or long-acting insulin is often prescribed with NovoLog. NovoLog can be mixed with insulin NPH (intermediate-acting insulin), but always draw NovoLog into the syringe first. Never mix NovoLog with Lantus. Do not mix NovoLog with other insulins if using an insulin pen or external pump. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, special sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. If you use more than one type of insulin, make each vial or pen look different by putting a rubber band around one type of insulin. 6. Check your medicine. NovoLog can be confused with Humalog (another rapid-acting insulin). When you pick up your insulin at the pharmacy, be sure it's Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

Early Pharmacokinetic And Pharmacodynamic Effects Of Mixing Lispro With Glargine Insulin

Early Pharmacokinetic And Pharmacodynamic Effects Of Mixing Lispro With Glargine Insulin

Go to: Clinicians who treat children with type 1 diabetes often try to minimize the number of daily injections to reduce treatment burden and improve compliance. Despite the manufacturer's cautions against mixing glargine with rapid-acting insulin analogs, clinical studies have failed to demonstrate deleterious effects of mixing on glucose excursions or A1C levels. However, no formal glucose clamp studies have been performed to determine whether mixing with glargine has an adverse effect on the early pharmacodynamic action of rapid-acting insulin in humans. To examine this question, euglycemic glucose clamps were performed twice, in random order, in 11 youth with type 1 diabetes (age 15.1 ± 3 years, A1C 7.6 ± 0.6%) with 0.2 units/kg lispro and 0.4 units/kg glargine, given either as separate or as a single mixed injection. Mixing the two insulins shifted the time action curve to the right, with significantly lower glucose infusion rate (GIR) values after the mixed injections between 60 and 190 min and significantly higher values between 270 and 300 min, lowered the GIRmax (separate 7.1 ± 1 vs. mix 3.9 ± 1, P = 0.03), and markedly delayed the time to reach GIRmax (separate 116 ± 8 min vs. mix 209 ± 15 min, P = 0.004). The GIR area under the curve was significantly lower after the mixed injections. Mixing had similar effects on plasma insulin pharmacokinetics. These data demonstrate that mixing lispro with glargine markedly flattens the early pharmacodynamic peak of lispro and causes a shift to the right in the GIR curve changes that might lead to difficulties in controlling meal-related glucose excursions. Pharmacokinetic profiles. Insulin concentration, measured by ELISA with a reported cross-reactivity of 44% for insulin glargine, for separate and mixed injections Continue reading >>

Insulin Types

Insulin Types

What Are the Different Insulin Types? Insulin Types are hormones normally made in the pancreas that stimulates the flow of sugar – glucose – from the blood into the cells of the body. Glucose provides the cells with the energy they need to function. There are two main groups of insulins used in the treatment of diabetes: human insulins and analog insulins, made by recombinant DNA technology. The concentration of most insulins available in the United States is 100 units per milliliter. A milliliter is equal to a cubic centimeter. All insulin syringes are graduated to match this insulin concentration. There are four categories of insulins depending on how quickly they start to work in the body after injection: Very rapid acting insulin, Regular, or Rapid acting insulins, Intermediate acting insulins, Long acting insulin. In addition, some insulins are marketed mixed together in different proportions to provide both rapid and long acting effects. Certain insulins can also be mixed together in the same syringe immediately prior to injection. Rapid Acting Insulins A very rapid acting form of insulin called Lispro insulin is marketed under the trade name of Humalog. A second form of very rapid acting insulin is called Aspart and is marketed under the trade name Novolog. Humalog and Novolog are clear liquids that begin to work 10 minutes after injection and peak at 1 hour after injection, lasting for 3-4 hours in the body. However, most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH insulin and are used as “bolus” insulins to be given 15 minutes before a meal. Note: Check blood sugar level before giving Humalog or Novalog. Your doctor or diabetes educator will instruct you in determini Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Insulin Treatment, Type 1

Diabetes: Insulin Treatment, Type 1

Type 1 Diabetes: Insulin Treatment Your child has Type I Insulin Dependent Diabetes. This type of diabetes happens when the body does not make enough insulin. Because the body needs insulin to stay healthy, your child must take insulin each day by injection to meet the body's needs to control blood sugars. Supplies you will need: Insulin Insulin syringe Alcohol swab or 70% alcohol and cotten ball Note:Insulin syringes come in four types - 25, 30, 50 and 100 units. On a 25-unit syringe, each line equals ½ unit. On the 30 and 50-unit syringe, each line equals 1 unit. On the 100-unit syringe, each line equals 2 units. Opened vials of insulin, cartridges or pens in current use do not need to be refrigerated if used within 30 days of their first use. Refrigerated and unopened vials or pens can last up to the expiration date on the box or vial. The injection hurts less if the insulin is allowed to come to room temperature before injecting. You may warm the insulin syringe by rolling the syringe between your hands before injecting. Label the bottle with the date when it is opened. The bottle or pen must be thrown away once it has been opened for 30 days (whether it has been refrigerated or is at room temperature). Levemir should be thrown away after 42 days. Drawing up your insulin Single Dose: Wash your hands. Check the insulin bottle before using it. Make sure that the expiration date has not passed and that the top of the bottle is not damaged. Make sure clear insulin stays clear and cloudy insulin is white, not clumpy. Lantus and Levemir are clear, long-acting insulins. Your doctor may give permission/orders allowing you to mix Lantus or Levemir with your short or rapid-acting insulin. Do not mix either of these insulins with any other insulin without first discussing thi Continue reading >>

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

How To Mix Insulin Clear To Cloudy

Learn how to mix insulin clear to cloudy. Drawing up and mixing insulin is a skill that nurses will utilize on the job. Insulin is administered to patients who have diabetes. These type of patients depend on insulin so their body can use glucose. Therefore, nurses must be familiar with how to mix insulin. The goal of this article is to teach you how to mix insulin. Below are a video demonstration and step-by-step instructions on how to do this. How to Mix Insulin Purpose of mixing insulin: To prevent having to give the patient two separate injections (hence better for the patient). Most commonly ordered insulin that are mixed: NPH (intermediate-acting) and Regular insulin (short-acting). Important Points to Keep in Mind: Never mix Insulin Glargine “Lantus” with any other type of insulin. Administer the dose within 5 to 10 minutes after drawing up because the regular insulin binds to the NPH and this decreases its action. Check the patient’s blood sugar and for signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia to ensure they aren’t hypoglycemic …if patient is hypoglycemic hold the dose and notify md for further orders. Key Concept for Mixing Insulin: Draw up CLEAR TO CLOUDY Remember the mnemonic: RN (Regular to Nph) Why? It prevents contaminating the vial of clear insulin with the cloudy insulin because if contaminated it can affect the action of the insulin. Why does this matter because they will be mixed in the syringe? You have 5 to 10 minutes to give the insulin mixed in the syringe before the action of the insulins are affected Demonstration on Drawing Up Clear to Cloudy Insulin Steps on How to Mix Insulin 1. Check the doctor’s order and that you have the correct medication: Doctor’s order says: “10 units of Humulin R and 12 units of Humulin N subcutaneous before b Continue reading >>

You Get The Beer, And I'll Get The Lantus

You Get The Beer, And I'll Get The Lantus

The other day, Steph and I were divvying up the shopping that we had to do. I was running low on Lantus, and our refrigerator was also running low on beer, so it was pretty obvious that someone had to get the refills. She also suggested that she would pick up some takeout pizza for supper. And I went to the pharmacy and picked up the insulin. The concept of beer, pizza, and insulin all being part of a tight-control diabetes program might strike some people as unreasonable. But let me assure you that it can work. My tight-control program consists of Novolog given immediately after most meals plus Lantus as basal insulin. Since starting this program a bit over a year ago, I’ve averaged 110 mg/dl on my blood glucose levels, and had normal A1cs, most recently 5.9 You might ask: do I have any restrictions on what I eat? Yup, but they have nothing to do with diabetes. If I eat too much, I’ll gain weight, and like most other people, I have no need to gain any more weight. How can such a program work? 1) Zillions of blood glucose measurements. For example, I always check my BG before driving. To be sure, once in a while, I’ll do only two BGs a day, but if things are exceptional, I have no hesitation to check 6-10 times in a day. 2) Figuring out how much insulin is needed for my routine foods. For me,** 1** slice of pizza takes 4 units of Novolog; 1 bottle of beer is 3 units; 1 English muffin with peanut butter is 3 units. 3) Counting carbs and taking the Novolog after eating. I simply add up the number of units of insulin I’ll need as I go, from salad (no insulin coverage needed) to main course to dessert. Then I pop the total number of units right then and there, using an insulin pen. 4) Injecting through clothing. I discussed this a while back at my other blog, in an Continue reading >>

Humulin N Can Be Mixed With Or In The Same Syringe Humulin R Regular Insulin

Humulin N Can Be Mixed With Or In The Same Syringe Humulin R Regular Insulin

humulin N can be mixed with or in the same syringe humulin R regular insulin Humulin n can be mixed with or in the same syringe This preview shows page 3 out of 3 pages. humulin N can be mixed with ------- or ------ in the same syringe: humulin R (regular insulin); rapid-acting insulinlong-lasting insulin: a. determir (Levemir), glargine (Lantus)which drugs cannot be mixed with other insulin or given intravenously: levemir and lantuswhich vial is tall and has a green top: levemir vialwhich vial is tall, narrow, purple print on the label, and has a purple top: lantuswhich drug do patients report more pain at the injection site: long-acting insulin in comparison with humulin N or NPH insulinwhich insulins are usually mixed: fast-acting and intermediate-actingExample of rapid acting and intermediate acting insulin: 1. Novo log mix 70/30 & humalog 75/25Example of fast acting and intermediate acting insulin: Humulin 70/30Novolin 70/30Humulin 50/50Which insulin is regularly mixed with protamine: Regular insulinWhich insulin is always drawn up first: RegularWhich injection is absorbed more rapidly & why: Intramuscular in comparison to subq bc muscle has more blood vessels than fatty tissuesA)What does a volume greater than 3ml causeB) what is the exception: a) Increased muscle tissue displacement & possible tissue damageB) occasionally 5ml of magnesium sulfate can be injected into dorsoglutealHow do you give a dose greater than 3ml: Split it & give at different sitesWhat is the avg needle length: 1.5 inEx of diluent: Bacteriostatic water or salineHow long can unused drug solutions be stored: 48 hrs to 1 weekbolus: iv pushwhat are the two methods to administer iv fluids and drugs: continuous iv infusion and intermittent iv infusionwhat does continuous iv infusion do: replaces Continue reading >>

What Would Happen If I Mixed Lantus With Novolog?

What Would Happen If I Mixed Lantus With Novolog?

What would happen if I mixed Lantus with Novolog? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please, join our community today to contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What would happen if I mixed Lantus with Novolog? I take both insulins by syringe and I almost used the same syringe for both. My syringes are the orange type and brand name is ReliOn. Is there a way that I can get diffient color for each syringe so I don't get these syringes mixed up and don't have to waste them by useing them only one time. Doctor told me I could use them more then one time. I would suggest you switch to the Lantus Solostar pen and eliminate this problem. I don't, but others that use the Lantus Solostar pen, or other pens, reuse their pen needles. In this way any cross contamination is virtually impossible. The possibility also exists that even though you might try using different color syringes...that system can also be compromised. You retinas cannot see the difference in colors in low light. Oops, forgot to answer your question: If you mix Lantus and Novolog together...your body will swell up twice its size and explode. If you're going to do this I suggest you do it in the bathroom. Less forensic clean up. The doctor told me to never mix the insulins together but I forgot to ask why not? The cost for me with insurance is 699.00 for five pens out of pocket. This is why I use insulin vial instead of the flexpens. The doctor told me to never mix the insulins together but I forgot to ask why not? The cost for me with insurance is 699.00 for five pens out of pocket. This is why I use insulin vial instead of the flexpens. If you accidentally inject lantus (from a used syringe) into the novolog, you're going to cause precipi Continue reading >>

How To Inject Lantus® With A Vial And Syringe

How To Inject Lantus® With A Vial And Syringe

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Make sure you have the type (beef and pork, pork, or human) and the strength of insulin that your doctor ordered for you. You may find that keeping an insulin label with you is helpful when buying insulin supplies. The concentration (strength) of insulin is measured in USP Insulin Units and USP Insulin Human Units and is usually expressed in terms such as U-100 insulin. Insulin doses are measured and injected with specially marked insulin syringes. The appropriate syringe is chosen based on your insulin dose to make measuring the dose easy to read. This helps you measure your dose accurately. These syringes come in three sizes: 3/10 cubic centimeters (cc) measuring up to 30 USP Units of insulin, ½ cc measuring up to 50 USP Units of insulin, and 1 cc measuring up to 100 USP Units of insulin. It is important to follow any instructions from your doctor about the careful selection and rotation of injection sites on your body. There are several important steps that will help you successfully prepare your insulin injection. To draw the insulin up into the syringe correctly, you need to follow these steps: Wash your hands with soap and water. If your insulin contains zinc or isophane (normally cloudy), be sure that it is completely mixed. Mix the insulin by slowly rolling the bottle between your hands or gently tipping the bottle over a few times. Never shake the bottle vigorously (hard). Do not use the insulin if it looks lumpy or grainy, seems unusually thick, sticks to the bottle, or seems to be even a little discolored. Do not use the insulin if it contains crystals or if the bottle looks frosted. Regular insulin (short-acting) should be used only if it is clear and colorless. Remove the colored protective cap on the bottle. Do not Continue reading >>

Can Lantus And Regular Insulin Be Taken Together?

Can Lantus And Regular Insulin Be Taken Together?

Community Answers Lantus is a sterile solution of insulin glargine that is used in injection form. The main thing that makes Lantus stand out from other insulins is that is long-acting with a duration of up to 24 hours. Regular insulin tends to be more short lived and is better used for controlling spikes in your blood sugar levels. While you are taking Lantus it is perfectly safe to use regular insulin to control spikes in your blood sugar. However as with any other medication be sure to consult your doctor before mixing drugs. Too much insulin can cause an unsafe drop in BG levels. It is important to follow your prescribed dosing schedule to ensure you maintain the proper insulin levels. I want to add to that last part , although insulin may be taken " together," as in you may take the long lasting Lantus Insulin and then LATER, when your blood sugar spikes, (usually after meals) you may take Regular insulin and Inject the insulin in a different area. Ex: If giving a subcutaneous injection in the stomach works for you, give the second injection in another part of the stomach. The reason for this is because different parts of your body will absorb the insulin differently.For instance the absorption rate injected in to your arm would be different the the absorption rate in your thigh. So, you may take Insulin Lantus and Regular Insulin "together," However, you can not put Insulin regular and insulin Lantus in the same syringe and give it in one dose. Simplified: You will have 2 insulin's and 2 injections. Continue reading >>

Insulin Basics | Diabetesnet.com

Insulin Basics | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:14 -- Richard Morris Store insulin you are not using in a refrigerator. It is a protein dissolved in water, sort of like a soup stock, so keep it cold to prevent it from spoiling. Keep it between 36º and 46º F. If it gets colder it will freeze. If the insulin freezes, when it thaws it will separate and clump and will no longer be usable. If it gets warmer it will be ok for awhile but will eventually spoil. If it starts to spoil, bacteria growing in it breaks down the insulin. It won't hurt you to use this. However, its not as effective so your blood sugar will be higher than you expect even though you took the right amount of insulin at the right time. It is ok to keep a bottle of insulin you are using at room temperature for up to 28 days (room temperature is 59º to 86º F). The preservative in insulin keeps it from spoiling this long. Insulin at room temperature injected into the skin is more comfortable for many people. Also, it may be easier to get rid of air bubbles in the syringe when it is at room temperature. If you live in a hot climate and your room temperature is above 80º, keep your insulin in the refrigerator. Insulin in a pen can only be kept at room temperature for 2 weeks before it begins to spoil. Check with your pharmacist, the package insert or the manufacturer's websites. Insulin used past 28 days at room temperature or past the expiration date on the box may still be good. However, using it may cause control problems and is not recommended. Lantus, Humalog and Novolog seem to spoil faster than Regular and NPH. If you can't afford to buy insulin and insurance does not cover it, you may be able to get it free. Check the website www.helpingpatients.org or call 202-835-3400. The doctor who prescribes your insulin can help you g Continue reading >>

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful because the needles are short and thin and the insulin shots are placed into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. In some cases, the doctor prescribes a mixed dose of insulin. This means taking more than one type of insulin at the same time. A mixed dose allows you to have the benefits of both short-acting insulin along with a longer acting insulin — without having to give 2 separate shots. Usually, one of the insulins will be cloudy and the other clear. Some insulins cannot be mixed in the same syringe. For instance, never mix Lantus or Levemir with any other solution. Be sure to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or diabetes educator before mixing. These instructions explain how to mix two different types of insulin into one shot. If you are giving or getting just one type of insulin, refer to the patient education sheet Insulin: How to Give a Shot. What You Will Need Bottles of insulin Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Syringe with needle (You will need a prescription to buy syringes from a pharmacy. Check with your pharmacist to be sure the syringe size you are using is correct for your total dose of insulin.) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of a Syringe and Needle You will use a syringe and needle to give the shot. The parts are labeled below. Wash the work area (where you will set the insulin and syringe) well with soap and water. Wash your hands. Check the drug labels to be sure they are what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date o Continue reading >>

Mixing Long And Short Acting Insulins In Same Syringe Does Not Compromise Long-t

Mixing Long And Short Acting Insulins In Same Syringe Does Not Compromise Long-t

Mixing Lantus and rapid-acting insulins as Humalog or Novolog does not compromise glycemic control. Similar to what has been shown in short-term studies, rapid-acting insulin analogues (RAI) can be mixed with insulin glargine without compromising long-term glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes, new research shows. The ability to give RAIs and insulin glargine in the same syringe has the potential to decrease the number of daily injections and increase use of insulin glargine, lead author Dr. Rosanna Fiallo-Scharer, from the University of Colorado in Denver, and colleagues note. As reported in the Journal of Pediatrics for April, the researchers compared glycemic control in 55 children who mixed insulin glargine and a RAI with that seen in 55 children who took separate injections. The ability to give rapid-acting insulin analogues (such as Apidra, NovoRapid) and long-acting insulin glargine (Lantus) in the same syringe has the potential to decrease the number of daily injections and increase use of insulin glargine, Dr. Rosanna Fiallo-Scharer, from the University of Colorado in Denver, and colleagues note in the Journal of Pediatrics The researchers compared blood sugar control in 55 children who mixed insulin glargine and a rapid-acting insulin analog with that seen in 55 children who took separate injections. Low and high blood sugar complications were uncommon and occurred with similar frequency in each group, the report indicates. After 6 months, HbA1c levels were nearly the same in each group, at 8.54 and 8.61. Likewise, the groups were comparable in terms of the percentages of blood glucose values that fell outside the target range. Hypoglycemic events and diabetic ketoacidosis events were uncommon and occurred with similar frequency in each group, the Continue reading >>

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