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Can You Give Yourself Lantus And Novolog At The Same Time?

Effect Of Food And Insulin On Blood Sugars

Effect Of Food And Insulin On Blood Sugars

Effect of Food and Insulin on Blood Sugars Learn how food and different types of insulin (long acting and fast acting, or lantus and bolus insulin) affect your blood sugars. Effect of Food and Insulin on Blood Sugars Megan Robinson, MS, RD, CDE, LDN: How does insulin and food affect your blood sugar? Youre taking two types of insulin. Lantus or Levemir insulin you can see in green is your basal insulin, also known as your long-acting insulin. And Novolog, Humalog or Apidra insulin you can see in blue is your bolus insulin, also known as your fast-acting. Lets talk about your basal insulin first. Lantus or Levemir insulin is typically given around the same time at night and can last up to 24 hours. Since Lantus is a basal insulin, it keeps your blood sugars within range between meals and while you are sleeping. It does not work on foods like carbohydrates. Your Bolus insulin, or in other words, your Novolog, Humalog or Apidra, you can see in blue, is a fast-acting insulin. These types of insulin begin working quickly, within 10 to 20 minute, peaks or works the hardest in two hours, and wears off in three to four hours. This may vary from person to person. Fast-acting insulin has two functions to lower high blood sugars and to cover carbohydrate grams. Every time you eat carbohydrates, you should give yourself fast-acting insulin to keep your blood sugars within a healthy range. Carbohydrate foods you can see in red, such as seen in fruits, milk, grains and sweets, break down to glucose or blood sugar quickly in your body. When you eat a food containing carbohydrates, it begins to raise your blood sugar within 10 minutes, can peak 60 to 90 minutes after eating. And, if you take the correct amount of fast-acting insulin to cover the carbohydrate grams in your meal and cou Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Can Lantus And Regular Insulin Be Taken Together?

Can Lantus And Regular Insulin Be Taken Together?

Community Answers Lantus is a sterile solution of insulin glargine that is used in injection form. The main thing that makes Lantus stand out from other insulins is that is long-acting with a duration of up to 24 hours. Regular insulin tends to be more short lived and is better used for controlling spikes in your blood sugar levels. While you are taking Lantus it is perfectly safe to use regular insulin to control spikes in your blood sugar. However as with any other medication be sure to consult your doctor before mixing drugs. Too much insulin can cause an unsafe drop in BG levels. It is important to follow your prescribed dosing schedule to ensure you maintain the proper insulin levels. I want to add to that last part , although insulin may be taken " together," as in you may take the long lasting Lantus Insulin and then LATER, when your blood sugar spikes, (usually after meals) you may take Regular insulin and Inject the insulin in a different area. Ex: If giving a subcutaneous injection in the stomach works for you, give the second injection in another part of the stomach. The reason for this is because different parts of your body will absorb the insulin differently.For instance the absorption rate injected in to your arm would be different the the absorption rate in your thigh. So, you may take Insulin Lantus and Regular Insulin "together," However, you can not put Insulin regular and insulin Lantus in the same syringe and give it in one dose. Simplified: You will have 2 insulin's and 2 injections. Continue reading >>

How To Use The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

How To Use The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Please check the leaflet for the insulin for complete instructions on how to store SoloSTAR®. If your SoloSTAR® is in cool storage, take it out 1 to 2 hours before you inject to allow it to warm up. Cold insulin is more painful to inject. Keep SoloSTAR® out of the reach and sight of children. Keep your SoloSTAR® in cool storage (36°F–46°F [2°C–8°C]) until first use. Do not allow it to freeze. Do not put it next to the freezer compartment of your refrigerator, or next to a freezer pack. Once you take your SoloSTAR® out of cool storage, for use or as a spare, you can use it for up to 28 days. During this time it can be safely kept at room temperature up to 86°F (30°C). Do not use it after this time. SoloSTAR® in use must not be stored in a refrigerator. Do not use SoloSTAR® after the expiration date printed on the label of the pen or on the carton. Protect SoloSTAR® from light. Discard your used SoloSTAR® as required by your local authorities. Protect your SoloSTAR® from dust and dirt. You can clean the outside of your SoloSTAR® by wiping it with a damp cloth. Do not soak, wash, or lubricate the pen as this may damage it. Your SoloSTAR® is designed to work accurately and safely. It should be handled with care. Avoid situations where SoloSTAR® might be damaged. If you are concerned that your SoloSTAR® may be damaged, use a new one. Continue reading >>

Giving The Wrong Insulin

Giving The Wrong Insulin

I recently received the following question: What happens if you take your P.M. insulin in the morning? My reply: First of all, everyone (including me) has messed up now and then when giving (or forgetting) their insulin shots, so please don’t blame yourself for what is a very human error. What will happen to your blood sugar level obviously depends on several factors that your question didn’t address. Anyone giving the wrong amount or type of insulin runs a risk of either high or low blood sugars, depending on the duration of effect and the amount of insulin given compared to the usual duration of effect and amount, and also upon meals and exercise. There are a lot of things that can cause your blood sugar reading to be off. Here's how to avoid the most common errors. With that in mind, if you realize you gave the wrong dose, the first thing to do is to realize your blood sugars may be wacky, so plan to check blood sugar levels more frequently during the next day or so, perhaps as often as every hour or two. And tell your family or friend what happened, and be sure they have the phone number to reach your doctor or diabetes nurse educator to discuss how to handle the situation if your blood sugar goes really goofy. Let me go through a few of the possibilities I can think of. If the insulin that you gave was a rapid-acting variety such as Regular, Humalog, Novolog, or Apidra, then the effects of the dose should dissipate over several hours, and the effect should be gone in about 6 hours. If the insulin was a long-acting variety such as Lantus or Levemir, then the effect will probably take a day or somewhat longer to wear off. Several websites have listings of various insulins and their usual duration of activity: See for instance Types of Insulin at my website. If yo Continue reading >>

Taking Shots At The Same Time Affect Anything?

Taking Shots At The Same Time Affect Anything?

Taking shots at the same time affect anything? Taking shots at the same time affect anything? Does taking Lantus about 15 mins before novolog have any affect on how well or fast the novolog works? It seems I always needs more novolog if I take it around my lantus. Or it doesn't work as well. Is there any truth to this? Does taking Lantus about 15 mins before novolog have any affect on how well or fast the novolog works? It seems I always needs more novolog if I take it around my lantus. Or it doesn't work as well. Is there any truth to this? Don't take them in the exact same spot. Other than that, nope. When you say the same spot do you mean my entire stomach or arm as the same spot or the same injection site. Moderator Type1 - Minimed 640G - Enlite CGM Just shoot at least a few inches away from your previous shot. When you say the same spot do you mean my entire stomach or arm as the same spot or the same injection site. I forget the reason, but I think it has to do with the Ph of the Lantus and the Novolog being different. If they are mixed together, even in your body (inject the two within an inch from each other) one will weaken the other / or both. Seperate legs, arms, or sides of the stomache and you should have no issues. The timing could be more to do with the fact that your Lantus is running out when you take your new shot. You should be perfectly fine to take both at the same time, I do it all the time - but I tend to use different areas - one in the left leg and one in the right - or at least a good gap between the jabs. The cure *could* be chocolate. I'm experimenting D.D. Family type 1 LADA new pumper via MM-522 The timing could be more to do with the fact that your Lantus is running out when you take your new shot. You should be perfectly fine to take bot Continue reading >>

Newbie Q: Lantus & Humalog Taken Close Together

Newbie Q: Lantus & Humalog Taken Close Together

Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community » Newbie Q: Lantus & Humalog taken close together Recently diagnosed and started injecting about ten days ago. The nurse told me to take the slow release Lantus Solostar at 2pm and the fast acting Humalog pen three times per day with meals. I opted to take the Lantus at 3pm to give a little bit of breathing space from lunch time. I travel a lot and I am finding that due to work and various other reasons my lunch time seems to be falling later and later around 2pm-3pm. My question is does this matter? If I take both injections close together? Obviously I will discuss this with the nurse next time I get the opportunity but does anybody have an opinion on the best time to take the slow release insulin? I was thinking maybe before bed. At the moment I am only getting consistently good BG readings post breakfast before lunch. With lantus you should try and keep the doses 24 hours apart although there's is some flexibility and an hour either way shouldn't make that much difference, but you can take it morning, afternoon or late evening. I use to take mine before bed but moved it back to ealier in the evening (6-7pm), if you do inject both insulin around the same time just be sure to use different injection sites and don't get the pens (and doses) mixed up, as ever your DSN will explain all if you ask. I've taken Lantus and NovoRapid at the same time many times and never had a problem, probably good to inject into different areas though. Not sure why your nurse suggested injecting your Lantus at 2pm. That's very inconvenient. I inject mine before bed every night - helps to get into a good routine and I can leave the pen by my bed for convenience rather Continue reading >>

Insulin Basics | Diabetesnet.com

Insulin Basics | Diabetesnet.com

Thu, 11/18/2010 - 15:14 -- Richard Morris Store insulin you are not using in a refrigerator. It is a protein dissolved in water, sort of like a soup stock, so keep it cold to prevent it from spoiling. Keep it between 36º and 46º F. If it gets colder it will freeze. If the insulin freezes, when it thaws it will separate and clump and will no longer be usable. If it gets warmer it will be ok for awhile but will eventually spoil. If it starts to spoil, bacteria growing in it breaks down the insulin. It won't hurt you to use this. However, its not as effective so your blood sugar will be higher than you expect even though you took the right amount of insulin at the right time. It is ok to keep a bottle of insulin you are using at room temperature for up to 28 days (room temperature is 59º to 86º F). The preservative in insulin keeps it from spoiling this long. Insulin at room temperature injected into the skin is more comfortable for many people. Also, it may be easier to get rid of air bubbles in the syringe when it is at room temperature. If you live in a hot climate and your room temperature is above 80º, keep your insulin in the refrigerator. Insulin in a pen can only be kept at room temperature for 2 weeks before it begins to spoil. Check with your pharmacist, the package insert or the manufacturer's websites. Insulin used past 28 days at room temperature or past the expiration date on the box may still be good. However, using it may cause control problems and is not recommended. Lantus, Humalog and Novolog seem to spoil faster than Regular and NPH. If you can't afford to buy insulin and insurance does not cover it, you may be able to get it free. Check the website www.helpingpatients.org or call 202-835-3400. The doctor who prescribes your insulin can help you g Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Do not take Toujeo® if you have low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the ingredients in Toujeo®. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens even if the needle has been changed. Before starting Toujeo®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

When you eat, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells for energy or storage. If you take insulin, you may need some at mealtime to help lower your blood sugar after you eat. But even between meals, you need insulin in small amounts to help keep blood sugar stable. This is where long-acting insulin comes in. If you have diabetes, either your pancreas can’t produce enough (or any) insulin, or your cells can’t use it efficiently. To control your blood sugar, you need to replace or supplement the normal function of your pancreas with regular insulin injections. Insulin comes in many types. Each type differs in three ways: onset: how quickly it starts working to lower your blood sugar peak: when its effects on your blood sugar are strongest duration: how long it lowers your blood sugar According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the five types of insulin are: Rapid-acting insulin: This type starts to work just 15 minutes after you take it. It peaks within 30 to 90 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. Short-acting insulin: This type takes about 30 to 60 minutes to become active in your bloodstream. It peaks in two to four hours, and its effects can last for five to eight hours. It is sometimes called regular-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin: The intermediate type takes one to three hours to start working. It peaks in eight hours and works for 12 to 16 hours. Long-acting insulin: This type takes the longest amount of time to start working. The insulin can take up to 4 hours to get into your bloodstream. Pre-mixed: This is a combination of two different types of insulin: one that controls blood sugar at meals and another that controls blood sugar between meals. Lo Continue reading >>

Lantus Dosing

Lantus Dosing

Well, I never thought I’d say this, but it’s a great week to be a person with Type 1 diabetes. With all of the bad news surrounding the Type 2 drug Avandia (rosiglitazone), it’s a relief to know I don’t have to worry about it. I recommended you read my colleague Tara’s blog entry (“Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”) for the full story. That’s one of the first times in my life I’ve referred to someone as a colleague. What can I say? It’s just not a word in my describe-a-friend/coworker vocabulary. While all of the controversy surrounds Avandia, I’m way over in Type 1 land contemplating whether or not to lower my daily dose of Lantus (insulin glargine). I’ve just started a brand new bottle of Lantus and I’ve been taking my normal 15 units in the morning and then eating a rather normal breakfast and lunch, but I’m still going low in the midmorning and early afternoon. This happened Monday after eating Brussels sprouts and whole-wheat pasta for lunch and only taking one unit of rapid-acting NovoLog (insulin aspart) to help out the Lantus. I’ve known for a while that my body is sensitive to insulin, but lately it’s been a little more sensitive than usual. I took 13 units of Lantus yesterday and my blood glucose was 86 mg/dl before lunch. I often wonder how much of an adjustment two units of Lantus is. While I’m very much locked in on an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio with my NovoLog, it’s a bit tricky to judge how much the longer-lasting insulins affect your blood glucose. Is there a chart for your Lantus dose? I seem to remember something from when I was diagnosed. I wonder what Google will tell me to do. I realize that Lantus doesn’t have a true peak the way some of the other insulins do, but sometimes it su Continue reading >>

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Insulin: How To Give A Mixed Dose

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful because the needles are short and thin and the insulin shots are placed into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. In some cases, the doctor prescribes a mixed dose of insulin. This means taking more than one type of insulin at the same time. A mixed dose allows you to have the benefits of both short-acting insulin along with a longer acting insulin — without having to give 2 separate shots. Usually, one of the insulins will be cloudy and the other clear. Some insulins cannot be mixed in the same syringe. For instance, never mix Lantus or Levemir with any other solution. Be sure to check with your doctor, pharmacist, or diabetes educator before mixing. These instructions explain how to mix two different types of insulin into one shot. If you are giving or getting just one type of insulin, refer to the patient education sheet Insulin: How to Give a Shot. What You Will Need Bottles of insulin Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Syringe with needle (You will need a prescription to buy syringes from a pharmacy. Check with your pharmacist to be sure the syringe size you are using is correct for your total dose of insulin.) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of a Syringe and Needle You will use a syringe and needle to give the shot. The parts are labeled below. Wash the work area (where you will set the insulin and syringe) well with soap and water. Wash your hands. Check the drug labels to be sure they are what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date o Continue reading >>

Is Mealtime Insulin Right For Me?

Is Mealtime Insulin Right For Me?

Diabetes & Insulin In diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or use it properly. This causes your blood sugar to go too high. Oral medications, like metformin, may help your body to use insulin more efficiently. Other oral medications can help your body make more insulin. However, these medicines often work for only a few years. When the oral medications stop working, you will need to give yourself background and/or mealtime insulin shots to help control your blood sugar. If you need insulin, it does not mean that you have failed. It is just a part of diabetes. Background insulin can help control your blood sugar when you are not eating. However, it does not cover the carbs that you eat at meals. If the dose of background insulin is raised to cover spikes in blood sugars that happen after you eat, your body will have too much insulin in between your meals and while you sleep. This can cause your blood sugar to go too low. This is called hypoglycemia. If you have high blood sugars after meals, this can cause tiredness, irritability, blurry vision, more frequent urination and thirst. Over time, high blood sugars can damage your feet, hands, and eyes. By adding mealtime insulin you can better match the insulin to what your body would produce if you did not have diabetes. This will help prevent both low and high blood sugars so that you feel better and get less damage from the diabetes. What is Insulin? Natural insulin is made from the pancreas to match what the body needs so your blood sugar stays in a normal range. The pancreas makes some amount of insulin all the time, called background or basal insulin. Background insulin helps to supply fuel to your muscles and controls the glucose that is released from your liver. Every time you eat, the pancreas releases a Continue reading >>

You Get The Beer, And I'll Get The Lantus

You Get The Beer, And I'll Get The Lantus

The other day, Steph and I were divvying up the shopping that we had to do. I was running low on Lantus, and our refrigerator was also running low on beer, so it was pretty obvious that someone had to get the refills. She also suggested that she would pick up some takeout pizza for supper. And I went to the pharmacy and picked up the insulin. The concept of beer, pizza, and insulin all being part of a tight-control diabetes program might strike some people as unreasonable. But let me assure you that it can work. My tight-control program consists of Novolog given immediately after most meals plus Lantus as basal insulin. Since starting this program a bit over a year ago, I’ve averaged 110 mg/dl on my blood glucose levels, and had normal A1cs, most recently 5.9 You might ask: do I have any restrictions on what I eat? Yup, but they have nothing to do with diabetes. If I eat too much, I’ll gain weight, and like most other people, I have no need to gain any more weight. How can such a program work? 1) Zillions of blood glucose measurements. For example, I always check my BG before driving. To be sure, once in a while, I’ll do only two BGs a day, but if things are exceptional, I have no hesitation to check 6-10 times in a day. 2) Figuring out how much insulin is needed for my routine foods. For me,** 1** slice of pizza takes 4 units of Novolog; 1 bottle of beer is 3 units; 1 English muffin with peanut butter is 3 units. 3) Counting carbs and taking the Novolog after eating. I simply add up the number of units of insulin I’ll need as I go, from salad (no insulin coverage needed) to main course to dessert. Then I pop the total number of units right then and there, using an insulin pen. 4) Injecting through clothing. I discussed this a while back at my other blog, in an Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

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