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Can You Get Low Blood Sugar From Stress?

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In this video I describe what happens during a panic attack and introduce a model for understanding the vicious cycle of panic, as well as the core components of psychological treatment of panic disorder. This is the first video in a four part series going beneath the surface to help you understand what lurks beneath the dreaded experience of panic attacks. Thanks for watching and don't forget to subscribe. Abdul Saad Clinical Psychologist www.vitalmind.com.au Facebook.com/vitalmindpsych

Low Blood Sugar And Panic Attacks: How Are They Related?

Low Blood Sugar And Panic Attacks: How Are They Related? Suddenly, you feel sort of woozy in an nebulous way. Something feels off, but you cant put your finger on it. Then, your heart starts beating faster, and you feel the need to sit down. You know your body is pleading for something but what does it want? What does it need? You continue to wonder as your body begins to sweat. These symptoms worry you, of course. Is this a panic attack? you ask yourself. After all, youve experience severe anxiety before. You know these uncomfortable sensations. You know that a racing heart and a woozy head usually signify an intense head-on collision with panic is just around the corner. HYPOGLYCEMIA: IMITATING PANIC ATTACKS SINCEWELL, ALWAYS The word hypoglycemia is just a fancypants way of saying low blood sugar or low blood glucose. And according to Edmund Bournes The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook , hypoglycemias main symptoms (light-headedness, trembling, feelings of unsteadiness) overlap with the symptoms of panic. And I can certainly vouch for that. As both a panicker and someone who sees regular dips in blood sugar, the overlap is uncanny. Well, that spells trouble, doesnt it? Sowhen youre Continue reading >>

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  1. Medusa_Lilit

    So my brother is a type two who needs to inject himself with insulin. His preference for injection is his upper thigh. Way upper thigh, so he does the injection in his room or the bathroom. This has resulted in him losing the insulin in his room or leaving it in the bathroom overnight. It's gotten to the point to where our dad wants him to do the injections in the living room, so someone can watch him and make sure that the insulin gets put away. Obviously, he can't be dropping his pants in the middle of the living room, nor does anyone want to stand in the bathroom with him while he drops his pants.
    He got extremely upset when my dad told him to find somewhere else to inject and actually started wailing a little when he gave it to himself in his arm (the underside).
    So does anyone have any suggestions as to where it's the least painful place to do this?

  2. Glenda

    Hello Medusa_ Lilit
    I'm sorry your brother is having trouble with his injections. As a Type 2 who is living on only insulin right now, hopefully I can help. It's really best to move around to different places. The underarm is good if you can pinch it up a bit and get it in the fatty part. My instructor taught me to do that by myself by sitting in a chair and pushing your arm into the back bringing out the fatty part. I use a pen so this is easier for me. I hope he has one too. The real best place is in the abdomen. There is a lot of fatty places there and room to keep moving around so he doesn't get sore places. For some reason it seems awful but it's really not. I feel it much less there and you can just pull your shirt up a little and do it very discretely.
    I don't know how old he is and wondering about how responsible he is but just getting into putting your pen...syringe...needles etc in one spot becomes habit. I made myself a little box for all of my supplies. Testing supplies also.
    Hope this helps some.
    Glenda Eakle

  3. Medusa_Lilit

    Glenda:
    Hello Medusa_ Lilit
    I'm sorry your brother is having trouble with his injections. As a Type 2 who is living on only insulin right now, hopefully I can help. It's really best to move around to different places. The underarm is good if you can pinch it up a bit and get it in the fatty part. My instructor taught me to do that by myself by sitting in a chair and pushing your arm into the back bringing out the fatty part. I use a pen so this is easier for me. I hope he has one too. The real best place is in the abdomen. There is a lot of fatty places there and room to keep moving around so he doesn't get sore places. For some reason it seems awful but it's really not. I feel it much less there and you can just pull your shirt up a little and do it very discretely.
    Unfortunately, we do not have a pen. We just have a bundle of 6 mm needles. Supposedly they're supposed to hurt less than the longer ones, but he says these are worse. Do you know if a pen can be bought over the counter?
    I don't know how old he is and wondering about how responsible he is but just getting into putting your pen...syringe...needles etc in one spot becomes habit. I made myself a little box for all of my supplies. Testing supplies also.
    He's 26, but he's mentally challenged so... it's complicated. Unfortunately, even though we have set a designated spot for the testing equipment and needles, that doesn't stop him from leaving his equipment scattered all over the place. For the longest time, he would even leave the little prickers on the floor! The insulin also has a desginated spot in the fridge, but it gets left on the bathroom counter or in the tub, on his bedroom floor... My biggest concern is what happens during the summer if he's still using the insulin. Where we live, it's routinely above 100 degrees and we don't have a cooling system in our house. Last thing we need is an entire bottle of insulin spoiling because he doesn't put it back.
    Hope this helps some.
    Thank you, I will suggest these spots to him and see how things go.
    Glenda Eakle

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Learn how adrenal fatigue and adrenal stress can effect and weight, energy and circulation. If you like what you hear, please subscribe to my YouTube Channel to see the most up to date new content. Every week I bring you: * The Ask Dr Kan Show where I help give you the answers to chronic health conditions like: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hashimotos, autoimmune disease, fibromyalgia, arthritis, fatigue, detoxification, digestion disorders, eczema, psoriasis, food allergies, food sensitivities, toxins, heavy metal toxicity, migraines, obesity, adrenal disorders, insulin resistance, hormone balance and much more. * The Mix: where you will see me and Shelby (my certified holistic nutritionist) make delicious and healing foods, fast, fun and easy. If your struggling with an autoimmune disease, want answers and need help, lets get you scheduled for a Skype or FaceTime phone consultation. Call (480) 988-6269 for more information and to get started on the path to wellness. To see over 100 life changing testimonials from patients who were struggling with autoimmune disease, thyroid dysfunction, digestion problems and more, visit https://www.askdrkan.com My YouTube Channel: https://www

Hypoglycemia And Adrenal Fatigue | Dr. Wilson's Adrenalfatigue.org

Both stress and adrenal fatigue can contribute to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) because of the key roles the adrenal hormones epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol play in blood sugar regulation. Stress (and the anticipation of stress) signals the body to raise blood sugar (glucose) levels in order to generate energy to respond to the stress. If the body cannot meet this higher demand for blood glucose, hypoglycemia can result. Stress may also provoke blood sugar swings that can have a cumulative effect on the bodys ability to maintain blood sugar balance, and aggravate hypoglycemic symptoms. In fact, some of the symptoms of hypoglycemia, such as irritability and nervousness, may sometimes be the effects of high levels of stress hormones rather than of the low blood sugar itself. During adrenal fatigue, when adrenal hormone levels are lower, it becomes harder to maintain blood sugar balance, especially in response the increased demand from stress. It has been known for almost a century that people who are chronically hypoglycemic are often also experiencing adrenal fatigue, and that people going through adrenal fatigue almost always have some form of irregular blood sugar patt Continue reading >>

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  1. Sorcha H(3)

    TTC with PCOS and taking Metformin

    Hi everyone,
    I've had my implant out a month and haven't had my AF yet .. And no signs. I know it takes a while to sort itself out but I've been on metformin for about 3 weeks. I was put on 500mg for the first week and if I was ok go up 500mg and then a week later go up again until I was on 1500mg. It upset my tummy at first and I still get cramps from the 500mg so haven't up'd it yet, I'm worried if I do it will upset my tummy more so letting it settle into my body first. I was wondering if 500mg has helped anyone else before? I will up it next week if I need to but can't make my mind up, because the cramps are ok to deal with now but doubling might make it ten times worse so any advice is great.
    I didn't bleed on the implant, so now I have no idea what my body is doing, so stressful not knowing what is going to happen ... Just rather AF came now if it means getting back on track. I have never had regular AF and its always been very heavy when I was on implant.
    So any advice is great!
    Baby dust to every one x

  2. Suzi C(19)

    Hi Sorcha
    I am sorry to read you have experienced pain with the Metformim

    Metformin may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe, do not go away, go away and come back, or do not begin for some time after you begin taking metformin:
    diarrhea
    bloating
    stomach pain
    gas
    indigestion
    constipation
    unpleasant metallic taste in mouth
    heartburn
    headache
    flushing of the skin
    nail changes
    muscle pain
    Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms or those listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, call your doctor immediately or get emergency treatment:
    chest pain
    rash I would be inclined to have a chat with your GP before you up the dose Sorcha, as you say you don't want the pain to double
    I hope you get some answers

  3. Mhairi J(7)

    Hello there,
    This is exactly how I conceived my first,
    and the metformin made me sooooo ill, but it does subside if you can stick with it. You do not need to rush the upping of the dosage so quickly if it is too much, as you are putting a lot of pressure on your body and then trying to conceive.
    Take an extra week on the two a day, and then see how you feel, if you need to, take another week, and then try the three, trust your instincts. If you are on quick release, and still struggle maybe ask your gp for the slow release form?
    I am currently trying to take them again as currently pregnant and developing gestational diabetes, but when I am pregnant they make me unable to eat !!!
    any questions please ask me !!!

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http://www.ilovepanicattacks.com/mail... - there are a couple of tricks to stop panic attacks.

Panic Attacks And Low Blood Sugar: Can They Be Related?

Suddenly, you feel sort of woozy. Something feels “off”, but you can’t put your finger on it. Then, your heart starts beating faster, and you feel the need to sit down, sleep or vomit. You sort of feel that your body is pleading for something, but what exactly does it want? You continue to wonder as your body begins to sweat. These symptoms begin to worry you, of course. “Is this a panic attack?” you ask yourself. After all, if you’ve experienced anxiety before then you know these uncomfortable sensations. You know what a racing heart and a woozy head usually signify. However, could potentially something else be amiss? Quite possibly! It could well be Hypoglycemia? The word “hypoglycemia” is just a fancy way of saying “low blood sugar” and according to Edmund Bourne’s The Anxiety and Phobia Workbook, hypoglycemia’s main symptoms (light-headedness, trembling, feelings of unsteadiness) overlap with the symptoms of panic. Well, that spells trouble, doesn’t it? So…when you’re feeling unwell, how can you differentiate between panic and low blood sugar? How can you know that what you’re feeling is “just” a bout of low blood sugar that will disappear wi Continue reading >>

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  1. JenF01

    Hello there,
    I was diagnosed with Type 1 back in 1981 and was originally on NPH and Regular. In 2001 a new endo switched me to Humolog and Lantus, which I have loved.
    I live in Arizona and just saw the individual coverage premiums for 2017 and I realized that I cannot afford that and stay on Lantus and Humolog. My answer is going to have to switch back to the NPH and Regular. I have already discussed this situation with my doctor and she has given me starting point for my basal and bolus.
    I am very nervous about this because I don't remember exactly how those insulins affected me. I have seen that a few people in this forum have switched from one insulin to the NPH and the Regular before, so I was wondering if there was a thread already here that discusses that scenario? I realize that everyone's body reacts differently to different insulins, but I wasn't sure if there was something that I especially need to watch for? Any advice would be very much appreciated.
    I searched but was not able to find anything in the forums. Of course, I could just be missing it. :-)
    Thank You!
    JenF
    Type 1 since 1981
    NPH and Regular 1981-2001
    Lantus and Humolog 2001- current

  2. t1wayne

    Hi Jen... and yes, you missed just such a discussion... but you didn't miss much. I essentially asked the same question several months ago, and got just a few observations. I'd find the thread and link to it, but it contained so little it doesn't matter much. In short... I was originally on NPH and regular from my dx's in 1966 until sometime in the 80's, when I started using Lantus and humalog, then Lantus and back to Regular. Then, the lantus was not allowed by my ins. co., and I couldn't afford it alone, so I went back to NPH. You can buy NPH and Regular at Walmart for $25 a vial (each) without a prescription. I lived on that for several months, but have now switched to Levemir and novolog... soon to be levemir and humalog (ins. issue again).
    Anyway... here's my short experience: the lantus was far superior to the NPH, as well as the levemir; the novolog is superior to the humalog, but both are better for mealtime dosing and correction dosing than Regular, though because I had so many years using regular, I found it easy to adapt.
    The real issue with the older insulins is their action time. Here's the scoop on that:
    NPH is an "intermediate" acting insulin. It begins working about 1 to 2 hours after injection, and has a steep peak of action from 4 to 8 hours, then drops steadily till about 10 or 11 hours, then fades out slowly until about 16 to 18 hours after injection, when it's virtually gone from your system. This makes it a lousy choice for a bedtime insulin, because it can cause nighttime hypoglycemic events; but it can be used in a split dose (half doses administered 12 hours apart, or 2/3 morning and 1/3 evening) to get a more even effect, and with less steep "peaks". This is far less effective than lantus, which works from about 1 to 2 hours after injection and rapidly reaches it's maximum effect, and stays at that same level of effectiveness for another 20 to 22 hours, then simply fades away almost at once.... at which time you're taking your next dose. So it's an excellent steady basal insulin.
    Levemir is close to lantus in it's effect... it begins working within 2 hours of injection, ramps up steadily to its peak at about 12 hours, and ramps down at the same pace as the ramp up, and is gone at about 20 hours. But it does have a more pronounced "peak" of action than lantus.
    Personally, I found that the lantus did have a noticable peak at about 5 to 6 hours after injection. The levemir peak is much later, and not as effective for me. But the NPH was a tough thing to go back to... and I'm glad I could switch to the levemir, though I'd still rather the lantus. BUT... I did find the NPH workable... albeit, with 2 doses a day instead of one.
    On the Regular v. novolog/humalog: same sorts of timing issues. Regular - a "short acting" insulin - starts working 30 to 60 minutes after injection, peaks from 2 to 5 hours, and lasts up to 8 hours. This makes it a lousy mealtime bolus choice... but if you plan ahead (and accurately), you can make it work. It's almost worthless as a "correction" insulin, because a correction dose of R insulin isn't doing any correcting for so long. Humalog and novolog are "rapid acting" insulins; they begin working within 15 to 30 minutes of injection, peak between 30 and 90 minutes, and are gone by 3 to 5 hours after injection... so just in time for your next mealtime dose.
    Since going to levemir/novolog, I've been using the remainder of my R and NPH for bedtime "correction" doses... as long as I only need a "soft", late correction.. like a couple of nites ago, my BG was okay (119), but I had a snack...and took a few units of the NPH; upon waking, my BG was 117. Still just a little high... but no low during the nite, and not an outrageous high.
    So there's some thoughts... come back with any other questions!
    w.

  3. diabetes2112

    Hello Jen! t1wayne gave good information, you may wnat to bg test a little more vigilantly at least at first until you get more comfortable with using R & N again.
    Jerry
    type 1 37 years
    Using R & N for 37 years

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