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Can You Drive Car If Water Pump Is Leaking

How Do You Know If Your Water Pump Is Bad

How Do You Know If Your Water Pump Is Bad

How Do You Know If Your Water Pump Is Bad How Do You Know If Your Water Pump Is Bad i change the thermo. it still over heating if it is the water pump can you still drive the car i believe you can normally see the water leaking from the waterpump..do you see any water leaking anywhere..check all the hoses and fluid level in radiator..but if the water pump if whats going bad i wouldn't drive on it at all your car will overheat really quick could result in bad thinks like a cracked block...so look around the engine for water leaks... Your car can overheat for various reasons: Bad thermostat, bad water pump, blown head gasket, bad radiator cap, clogged radiator, fan not comming on, etc....... As far as the water pump goes it is usually replaced at the same time as the timing belt. Anywhere from 60k-90k is the recommended replacement time. Do some reading here on the symptoms for each of the causes I listed, but the short of it is - Bad thermostat & water pump will give you low/no flow Blown headgasket will give you, (I forget) oil in the antifreeze, or antifreeze in the oil. Either one is bad news. It would not be wise to continue to drive it since this can cause A LOT more damage if you don't fix it soon. My car is overheating after driving and then I come to a stop. Not all the time but its really starting to drive me crazy. I flushed the radiator, put all new fluids. I also put in a Factory Thermostat, and ran my fan to stay on at all times. Any ideas why this would this be happening? There are no leaks, and this is really bugging me. Mine used to do that after flushing the radiator...I did everything from changing water pump...too new coolant...too new thermostat...but it will still overheat after driving the car and coming too a stop. What fixed it I don't know but I Continue reading >>

How To Tell If A Car's Water Pump Needs Replacement

How To Tell If A Car's Water Pump Needs Replacement

How to Tell if a Car's Water Pump Needs Replacement Your car's water pump is an important part of your vehicle. It is the part that continually pumps coolant to your vehicle's engine so that it doesn't overheat. A leak or a faulty bearing can cause serious damage to your car's engine. Puddles of coolant underneath your vehicle or high temperature readings may be signs that your water pump needs replacing. Let your car sit overnight, parked in a garage with a clean concrete floor. If it's not possible to park it inside on a clean concrete surface, place a piece of light-colored cardboard underneath your car directly under the motor. Be mindful that water pumps are more likely to leak while the vehicle engine is running, so this is a poor reference for finding a leak. Examine the cardboard the next morning. If it appears to be wet from coolant, you have a leak somewhere, possibly in your water pump, but other sources of leaking coolant could be radiator hoses, heater hoses, freeze plugs, gaskets, or the radiator itself. To narrow the search down, try to place the cardboard directly underneath the water pump itself. If you notice green liquid on the cardboard, it's antifreeze. This means you have a coolant leak somewhere. Check the water pump pulley. Find the round part at the front of your water pump that the belt is around. Attempt to rock the pulley back and forth. If it seems to be loose, it may be time to replace it, because the bearing is going bad. Listen to your car. Start your car's engine with the hood up. If you hear a low-pitched grinding noise, it may indicate that your water pump bearing is going bad. You can often hear it plainly if it's gone bad. You also have similar bearings in your AC compressor, power steering pump, and alternator, so you need to be ab Continue reading >>

Water Pump Leaking: What Do I Risk Driving Like That? - Mercedes-benz Forum

Water Pump Leaking: What Do I Risk Driving Like That? - Mercedes-benz Forum

Vintage Mercedes-Benz > Water pump leaking: what do I risk driving like that? yesterday the water pump on my 3.5 M116 engine started leaking quite badly. it seams to come from a hole at the bottom of the water pump housing. By looking at the schemes on the Workshop manual it looks like the sliding ring seal behind the propeller has failed. I have a spare water pump but I have no clue whether it is better than the one I have in place now and I don't want to do all the work of replacing the pump only to discover it is also faulty. I'm still to decide if I order a gasket kit and renew them on my spare water pump before fitting it or if I order a new water pump. But this will take some days anyway. My problem is this is the only car I have and I had planned a 800 miles round trip early next week and the thing won't be repaired by then. So far it takes two hours of driving before the temp needle starts going up and I need to refill the radiator. When the engine is stopped it does not leak, unless I take the radiator cap out and then it starts dripping from the water pump. I would like to tempt the trip anyway by stopping and refilling from time to time. - do I risk some water pump complete failure such as bearings seizing etc? - will a stop leak of any sort help at least reduce the leak? - anybody drove a car with a similar problem? It's a kind of risky but you know already that you are loosing coolant ,so the worst is you get stranded,if it get too hot you need to shut the engine of before it overheats. For sure I would put a stop leak in ,it swells up the seals so it can't get worst. I once took a cab in Thailand he had no radiator cap so he filled every 50 Miles water in,as long as there is water in the radiator you can drive 1000 of miles. - do I risk some water pump co Continue reading >>

Coolant Leak - Safe To Drive? - Automotive

Coolant Leak - Safe To Drive? - Automotive

So I've discovered my 1999 Toyota Camry has a nasty leak in the coolant system water is coming out at in very fast drops. The radiator was completely dry last night and the engine was starting to overheat before I realised. The leak is close to the engine at the water pump, I think. Now, my question is is it safe to drive the car for short distances (15min or so) when I only have water in the radiator, as long as I keep a very close eye on the temperature needle and bring plenty of water with me? I need to get to work this afternoon and public transport is not an option... Personally, I wouldn't drive it. If it's an absolute must. Make the trips short and keep plenty of water with you. if it's 15min.. I guess you can stretch it with extra water in the boot. But I still personally wouldn't. Betime the guage goes up, it'll be too late. Also, heatsoak causes the engine to get hotter when you turn it off... A $50 taxi is a better option compared to a $1k+ engine rebuild. Also, heatsoak causes the engine to get hotter when you turn it off A $50 taxi is a better option compared to a $1k+ engine rebuild. Hopefully my engine hasn't been too damaged already. If the leak was quite slow, it may have been okay. I had a fast leak once that happened whilst driving. The radiator had been previously temporarily fixed with that stuff you put in that blocks the holes, but eventually it went again. I only had about 3-4 km to drive, I refilled the radiator up, kept water with me, but by the time I drove 3km, it had already leaked most of it and I could hear it hissing. I was lucky. If the engine was stone cold, perhaps a 5 minute drive would be okay, but not 15 mins, that's too long. Get a taxi... Ok, thanks guys. I'm able to borrow a housemate's car :) In all honesty. If it isn't leaking Continue reading >>

Can I Drive With A Bad Water Pump?

Can I Drive With A Bad Water Pump?

The shop diagnosed the water pump as bad, and now they're not getting back to me. I know nothing about water pumps, but the shop diagnosed it as bad because the pulley has a little play in it. I'm not leaking coolant, not overheating, not smoking. I'm trying to go back home two and a half hours away for Thanksgiving but I'm not sure if it's ok to drive that far. Featured Products from our Supporting Vendors you could. it might be okay, it might not be. if you do, i would be super easy on the car, and carry some extra coolant with ya just in case. other than that, i dunno Go ahead and drive it, but take an extra alternator belt with you, and watch your temp gauge!! Also make sure just all the bolts in the pulley are actually tight, and that the pulley isnt on backwards. Do you want to keep driving it this way? No. However if it fails you will know it, your temp gauge will go up fast. Order a new pump asap if you're positive the shop is correct and it's bad. There's an extra alternator belt and coolant in the trunk already. Is there some way of distinguishing if the pulley is on backwards? im sure you would be able to tell by looking at it....look at which way it aligns best... its kinda hard to belive someone could put it it on backwards but ya never know i think you shoud be fine but like stated above WATCH YOUR TEMPERATURE GAUGE!!!! no need to blow a headgasket for something like that what was it doing wrong that you took it to a shop? Something was making a gnarly rumbling noise over 3k rpm and was vibrating the gas pedal. Upon closer inspection the power steering pump was moving around over 3k, if you held it down and revved there was no vibrating. Put on a new power steering pump and it was still moving around, that's when they checked the water pump pulley. You co Continue reading >>

What Would Cause A Water Pump In My Car To Leak? I Noticed The Water Pump Was Leaking Badly, What To Do?

What Would Cause A Water Pump In My Car To Leak? I Noticed The Water Pump Was Leaking Badly, What To Do?

Answered 43w ago Author has 175 answers and 41.1k answer views How do you know if your water pump is going bad? The following signs indicate that a water pump needs to be replaced: When a water pump is new, some seepage from the weep hole is normal as it takes about ten minutes of operation for the mechanical seal to properly seat itself. Cause: Contaminated coolant is the main cause of weep hole leakage. Solution: Thoroughly flush the cooling system before installing the new pump and refill the system with the correct vehicles coolant . Seepage drips or large coolant bleed marks on or around the mounting surface. Cause: Improper water pump installation or improper use of seals/gaskets . Solution: In case of recently installed new water pump : carefully remove, check and re-install the water pump. If the leakage is not the consequence of an improperly installed new water pump , the pump must be replaced immediately. Rust and corrosion on the surfaces of the water pump which makes the pump ineffective in moving the coolant . Cause: Contaminated coolant , non-compatible coolant or mixing coolants of different chemistries. Solution: Replace the water pump . Thoroughly flush the cooling system before installing the new pump and refill the system with the correct vehicle manufacturers recommended coolant. Inspect the pressure cap and replace if defective. With the engine off, check the condition of the bearing by looking for any side-to-side play at the shaft. Apply hand pressure; there should be no play at all. Cause: A misaligned belt causes excessive wear. An over-tensioned belt causes overload on the bearing, accelerating wear. A damaged mechanical seal allows coolant to leak through the bearings and wash away the lubricator. Solution: Replace the water pump and make su Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of A Bad Or Failing Water Pump

Symptoms Of A Bad Or Failing Water Pump

Common signs include coolant leaks at the front-center of the car, loose water pump pulley, overheating engine, and steam coming from the radiator. by a top-rated mechanic at your home or office In order to run cool on those hot summer days, your engine needs to have a consistent flow of coolant supplied from the radiator throughout the engine. The water pump is the primary component responsible for maintaining this flow. When it works properly, your car will maintain a consistent operating temperature, run smoothly, and take you anywhere you need to travel. When the water pump fails or is beginning to wear out, it can lead to complete engine failure. When the water cooled (as opposed to air cooled) engine was introduced, many automotive experts believed that the water pump circulating coolant through the engine block was just as critical to engine protection as oil. This philosophy holds true even as technology has improved over the years to create more efficient cooling systems in today's modern cars. Your cars water pump is the key to making the entire system work. It is an impeller pump and is usually buried under the timing belt cover on the side of the engine. The pump is operated by the engines drive belt as the belt turns, the pump turns. Blades on the pump force coolant to flow through the engine and back to the radiator to be cooled by a forced air cooling fan. Although the water pumps in most modern cars, trucks, and SUVs will last a long time, they are by no means indestructible. Like any other mechanical device, they will produce a few warning signs that they are wearing out , so that car owners can contact a local ASE certified mechanic to replace the water pump before additional engine components are damaged. Here are some common symptoms that hint towar Continue reading >>

When To Replace Your Car's Water Pump

When To Replace Your Car's Water Pump

It's a good idea to change your car's water pump at the same time as the timing belt. (Photo by Anya Semenoff/Angie's List magazine) Your car's water pump is out of sight, but don't keep it out of mind. The water pump receives little attention tucked away out of sight under your cars timing belt cover. But without a water pump, your car would overheat and you'd be left shopping around for a new engine. The water pump plays an important role in your cars cooling system and continually pumps coolant and water into the engine. Operated by the drive belt, blades on the pump allow coolant to flow into the engine. Although water pumps are built to last, they sometimes break down and require replacement. "Sadly, there are times that water pumps fail without any notice, says Lynn Beckwith, owner of Beckwiths Car Care in Humble, Texas. However, a small bit of attention can help you spot a possible problem. Water pumps can fail in several ways. They can leak and lose precious coolant, as well as fail internally with bearing and shaft issues, or have impellers fail." The electrical fuel pump transfers fuel from the fuel tank to the engine. It can last the life of your vehicle, but only if it's properly cared for. How to know when to replace the water pump A coolant leak near the timing belt often signals an issue with the water pump. "A coolant leak of any kind should never be ignored, and, when it's coming from under the timing belt cover, it's probably going to be from the water pump, Beckwith says. Overheating or a sudden change in the temperature gauge can also signal a problem. You can also check by pulling back and forth on the water pump pulley. Beckwith says if theres any play or you can move the water pump back and forth it could mean the shaft and bearings are loose. "W Continue reading >>

How Long Can I Drive With A Leaking Water Pump? | Yahoo Answers

How Long Can I Drive With A Leaking Water Pump? | Yahoo Answers

How long can i drive with a leaking water pump? I noticed it was leaking 2 days ago, and I don't have the money to get it worked on now. It's leaking but the engine is not getting hot or over heating. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Long enough to get it to a repair shop. Once the pump starts leaking the bearings in the pump failing isn't too far behind and depending on the vehicle when the pump freezes up it can do allot of damage. Such as throwing the fan into the radiator. You can drive it as long as you monitor the coolant level. Add water as needed. Don't let it run low or you'll be faced with a potential overheat. Carry some with you. If you're in a cold climate you cannot use plain water. You must use at least 50% anti-freeze (or the pre-mixed stuff) or you risk a freeze and possibly destroy the engine. Now then, if the pump is leaking around the pulley shaft there's a seal in there that's failing. It will only get worse. Likely after a while the bearing in there will fail too. The pump will start screaming at you. This is bad and needs to be replaced quickly before it seizes up. If it is leaking at a gasket on the engine block the gasket can be replaced. Assuming the pump is still in good order it won't have to be replaced. This leak will likely get worse too. Another concern is where the leaking water goes. If it's just dripping down it probably isn't a big deal. But if it sprays around the engine onto other things there could be some serious consequences. Well the leak will only get worse and eventually the coolant will get into the bearings of the water pump and then it will lock up or fly apart. Not a good deal on a rear wheel drive car because the fan that is attached to the water pump will hit the radiator then you need a belt, w Continue reading >>

Driving With A Leaking Water Pump?

Driving With A Leaking Water Pump?

Our 1.6 FSI Audi A2 seems to have sprung a leak at the water pump despite having covered just 49k miles. They have aplastic impellor which is a know weak point on this engine. The car came with AA cover and a warranty so will be going back to the supplying dealer to have it fixed. However, the AA cant take it to the dealer until the morning when I'll be at work. Therefore it would be easier to have the car there with me for them to collect. Its a 3 mile drive that takes about 15 minutes. If I brim the header tank before I leave, whats the worst that could happen? Is it likely to jam and result in cambelt / engine death ? If it does, I doubt the warranty will cover it if they've offered to pick it up. 3 miles in 15 minutes is 12mph, I guess it's a lot of traffic? I think you'd be at high risk of damaging the engine. If it was all open roads and it was an all iron engine I might have risked it. A taxi to work will be much cheaper than a new engine. Tie key for car to a piece of string, and hang behind your front door, so the collector can reach through the letterbox for it. 15 min drive, no worries unless it's niagra falls under there. I wouldn't risk it. Topping up the water will make no difference to engine cooling efficiency if the water pump is cooked. I had similar happen to my mx5 earlier this year. The car would overheat after about half a mile due to no circulation of water. Eventually got it to a garage a mile away after two journeys! 15 min drive, no worries unless it's niagra falls under there. Do you run a cylinder head refacing company? 15 min drive, no worries unless it's niagra falls under there. Do you run a cylinder head refacing company? If it's pouring out he's taking a risk. If it's dripping out he'll have no problems. Edited by Larry Dickman on Wedne Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Drive Car With No Water Pump? Mustang 2001

Is It Possible To Drive Car With No Water Pump? Mustang 2001

To answer your first question, yes, it is very possible to drive a car without a water pump . In fact, in the late 90s, it was popular with many shade tree mechanics or hot rod enthusiasts to remove the water pumps (especially from their Mustang, Firebird, Camaro) in order to gain some extra horsepower. However, there are significant problems that will come up, one of which is overheating. Sometimes mechanics have a hard time articulating the actual problem. In this case with your 2001 V6 Ford Mustang, its quite possible that the new mechanic is trying to tell you that you need a new water pump. I have a hard time believing that somebody took the stock water pump out of the V-6 engine entirely at some point and that the engine hasnt completely shut down. But it is possible to run a motor without one but highly unlikely. If you plan on keeping your car, then you definitely need to have a new water pump installed , flush out the coolant system , and make sure all the coolant hoses are clean and free of holes. If you want to have this done, a technician from YourMechanic can look at your car and perform these replacements at your preferred location. Continue reading >>

Water Pump Failure - How To Repair A Faulty Water Pump | K-seal

Water Pump Failure - How To Repair A Faulty Water Pump | K-seal

If you want to avoid expensive mechanic bills but dont have the technical knowledge or experience needed to resolve a leaking water pump in any other way, K-Seal is the option for you it can fix most leaks in the water pump casing and in the seals. Want to get hold of a bottle to fix your water pump? Use our simple stockist search facility and get back on the road fast. What Are the Symptoms of Water Pump Failure? The engine may be overheating, which you may not be able to ascertain until the warning light comes on. A general idea of what the operating temperature should be might help, but only if it can be easily measured Coolant may beleaking around the water pump through the weep holes on the casing. There will be a puddle on the floor when the car has stood in the same position for a few hours all you have to do then is follow the leak to its source The water pump may be making more noise than it usually does when the engine is running (though this will mean that you have to know how much noise it should usually make). The source of the louder noise will probably come from a defective impeller or an impeller that is coming away from its shaft, in which case it will have to be replaced How Much Will Water Pump Repair Cost at a Garage? The cost of replacing a water pump will vary considerably depending on a number of factors, such as the garage you visit and the car you drive. Although the cost of a water pump will usually be somewhere between $50and $75, the amount charged for labour will boost the total you pay. Some water pump replacement jobs can cost as much as $500. Its therefore important to get quotes from a range of local mechanics so you can be sure youre getting the best deal. The water pump ensures that enough coolant liquid is flowing around the cooling Continue reading >>

Radiator - Can I Drive A Car With Only Water And No Coolant If It Has A Leak? - Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair Stack Exchange

Radiator - Can I Drive A Car With Only Water And No Coolant If It Has A Leak? - Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair Stack Exchange

Can I drive a car with only water and no coolant if it has a leak? Recently, I was informed that a car I share ('02 Nissan Sentra) was close to overheating. I was told it gets close to the upper limit very quickly upon running the car. When I inspected the vehicle, I realized that the coolant overflow was empty and the radiator's coolant level was rather low (not sure exactly how low but it seems at most 75% remains). The car must be taken to a mechanic. However, the mechanic I trust and usually use is about 30 miles away. I assume there is a leak in a hose, connector, or perhaps the water pump. The radiator is new so I do not suspect it is the source of this issue. Because I am assuming there will be a leak, I think that when I drive it, it will most likely loose coolant. Also because of this assumption, I am weary of putting coolant in if it is just going to leak out. I am assuming I will have to make a few stops to fill the overflow (not touching the radiator). Can I put pure water in the radiator and overflow tank and limp the car 30 miles (mostly on the freeway - yikes)? Great answers here, I just wanted to post what I actually ended up doing in the hopes of it helping someone at some point, or maybe to satisfy curiosity. I decided not to go with pure water because I have read that a 50/50 ratio of coolant to water is desirable and figured even if it were leaking, should it be slow, I should follow best practice. I was unsure what type of coolant my car used, so I just went to the dealer and got a container of what was standard. The reservoir was completely empty, and the radiator had a low level of water. I added some water (maybe 1.5L) to the radiator to top it off and I filled the reservoir to the "MAX" line. I read from a post that a simple test you can do is Continue reading >>

Broken Water Pump. Ok To Drive Short Distance? - Mechanicadvice

Broken Water Pump. Ok To Drive Short Distance? - Mechanicadvice

Broken water pump. OK to drive short distance? My water pump broke and leaked last week and I can't get any openings for it to be fixed until next tuesday. My work is only about 5 minutes away and the weather isn't too warm still. Is it okay to drive that distance? (Approx. 2km) I would say no. Depending on how bad the leak is (and outside temperatures) you may be able to limp it along by adding plain water every time you drive to/from work. ONLY do this if it doesn't leak out by the time you get to work, and outside temperatures are going to be above freezing. Else you run the risk of overheating and wrecking your engine, or having the water freeze & crack your engine block. Also, with plain water wouldn't rust become a concern? I wouldn't drive it any more than up a driveway or onto a trailer. Ride your bicycle or walk to work until you fix it. Describe broke. As in not functioning at all? Pieces missing? Or is it just leaking. Pieces missing or broken, the water in the head turns to steam in seconds. I would only run the car 30 seconds tops. If its just leaking, keep it full and roll out. If its a small drip and you top it off and stop anytime the temp gauge starts to move past normal then yea. If its a stream or trickle of coolant then no. To clarify, do not top off after the gauge moves past normal. Stop and wait for it to cool down first. stop anytime the temp gauge starts to move past normal I wouldn't wait that long, honestly. The coolant will be low and not circulating properly, so the temperature at the sensor is likely much cooler than inside the block. Being conservative it would be smarter to not just drive your car. Since you're only five minutes away from where you need to be, you would save more money preventing something going wrong than losing five mi Continue reading >>

5 Symptoms Of A Bad Water Pump And Replacement Cost

5 Symptoms Of A Bad Water Pump And Replacement Cost

Home Engine Info 5 Symptoms of a Bad Water Pump and Replacement Cost 5 Symptoms of a Bad Water Pump and Replacement Cost The engine of a vehicle produces a lot of heat. If the engine becomes too hot, then it can be damaged. Fortunately, there is a cooling system in every vehicle which prevents this from happening. It does this with a water pump that allows coolant to circulate throughout the components of the engine. While the water pump spins, it moves fluid away from the center of the engine on a continual basis. The pump is positioned close to the center where the pump vanes can make contact with the radiator fluid that comes back in. From there, the vanes push the fluid away from the pump and into the engine. After the fluid passes through the cylinder head and engine block, it reaches the radiator and then goes back into the pump so the cycle can begin again. If your engine overheats, then it can ultimately lead to engine failure if the problem is not fixed fast enough. The last thing youll want to do is pay for a new engine. So, you should educate yourself on water pumps and how they are important for allowing the cooling system to function properly. More importantly, you need to understand the main symptoms of a failed water pump so you will know when to get your pump replaced. Below are the 5 most common symptoms. The most obvious symptom will be an overheated engine. Since a functional pump is needed for coolant to circulate in the engine and cool it down, a bad pump will prevent the engine from being cooled down. As a result, heat will build up in the engine until it is at an overheated temperature. There are two ways that a driver can notice this happening. One way is the reading of the temperature gauge on the dashboard and the other way is when the tempera Continue reading >>

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