diabetestalk.net

Can You Die Without Insulin?

Can I Treat Diabetes Without Drugs?

Can I Treat Diabetes Without Drugs?

If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take daily insulin injections to keep your blood glucose in a normal range. Your body produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a vital hormone that helps your body convert food into energy. Without insulin, you would die. If you have type 2 diabetes, the answer to this question is much less clear. Many people can keep their blood glucose in a healthy range without medications (either oral diabetes medications or insulin injections) if they lose weight and keep their weight down, are regularly physically active, and follow a meal plan that helps them keep portion sizes under control and helps them spread the amount of carbohydrate they eat at each meal throughout the day. Eventually, however, many people with type 2 diabetes find that despite their best efforts, weight control, exercise and diet aren't enough to keep their blood glucose in a healthy range. This is not unusual. One theory is that some people's insulin-producing cells just get tired out from having to produce more and more insulin because their cells are resistant to the effects of insulin. If your healthcare team tells you that you need to take oral diabetes medications or insulin injections to manage your blood glucose, it's important that you follow their instructions. Keeping your blood glucose in a healthy range is key to preventing long-term complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks, and other problems that poorly controlled blood glucose can cause over a period of years. Continue reading >>

How Did Diabetic People Survive Without Insulin Therapy In The Past?

How Did Diabetic People Survive Without Insulin Therapy In The Past?

If you're talking type 1 diabetes: starvation. Literally. If you didn't die first. Frederick Madison Allen theorised that restricted calorie intake and engaging in regular exercise would prolong the life of insulin-producing beta cells. Alongside a starvation diet, Allen insisted his patients receive plenty of exercise. As some patients died from starvation, critics viewed his treatment as cruel, but Allen argued that on his diet, life was tolerable for patients. It really wasn't until Banting, Best and his team came along and isolated insulin that type 1 diabetes life expectancy increased substantially. (And so awesome is Banting, that when he won the Nobel Prize, he shared the prize money.) Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Whitworth, United Kingdom: How long can someone live without insulin? Answer: The fact that you are asking the question has me suspiciously worried! I hope you are not trying to hurt yourself or planning to see how long you can go without insulin. The answer, perhaps, mostly lies in how long the person has had type 1 diabetes. For someone like yourself, who indicated that you have had diabetes for more than 10 years, you MIGHT be able to live for 7 to 10 or so days without insulin. But, the death would be awful and difficult and not peaceful. You would begin to have much urination and be extremely thirsty; but, you would also develop abdominal pain and get nauseated and vomit so you might drink but not be able to keep anything down with all the vomiting. You would start to get achy and sore and could have a terrible headache as your brain began to swell! You would have blurred vision and would begin to become delirious before you probably would go into a coma and become brain dead. The death would be awful to watch and impossible to bear by those that love you. And even if you did not progress that far to death, if there were too much delay before you could get taken to an emergency room, the damage may already have been done and it might be too late to reverse matters back to normal. DO NOT OMIT YOUR INSULIN DOSES. Additional comments from Dr. Tessa Lebinger: Some children and teenagers are so dependent on insulin, they could develop life threatening ketoacidosis in less than one day if they skip their insulin, especially if they are sick with another illness. Most people who make no insulin are very uncomfortable within 12 hours of missing a dose. People who are still making a lot of insulin and are still in the remission phase, may be able to stop insu Continue reading >>

Treating Type 2 Diabetes Without Insulin

Treating Type 2 Diabetes Without Insulin

When you think of diabetes medication, you probably think of insulin. In many cases, treatment for type 2 diabetes may never actually involve insulin replacement. Although type 2 diabetes is caused by a failure of the body to make or properly use its own insulin, a hormone needed for blood sugar control, there are many treatment plans for type 2 diabetes without insulin replacement. “You could say that everybody with type 2 diabetes will eventually need insulin if they lived long enough," explains Kevin M. Pantalone, DO, an endocrinologist and diabetes expert at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. "But in reality, only about 20 to 30 percent of people with type 2 diabetes ever need it. We have lots of other options we can use first." First-Line Options: Diet, Exercise, and Metformin “Diet and exercise alone were once the standard diabetes therapies for early type 2 diabetes, but that has changed over the past few years," Dr. Pantalone says. "The American Diabetes Association (ADA) now recommends starting the diabetes medication metformin early. Today, only a minority of people are prescribed diet and exercise alone for diabetes." According to a review of type 2 diabetes management plans published in the journal Clinical Diabetes in 2012, metformin should be used as initial therapy for type 2 diabetes because it can lower A1C by 1 to 2 percent. A1C is a blood test that measures your average blood sugar over the past two to three months. The goal is to have an A1C score of 7 percent or less. Doctors use this measurement to decide on treatment options from lifestyle changes and oral medications to insulin replacement. Here’s more on the first-line treatments for diabetes: A diabetes diet. A healthy diet is important for controlling blood sugar, maintaining a healthy weight Continue reading >>

Diabetics After The Apocalypse

Diabetics After The Apocalypse

WRITTEN BY: Forester McClatchey People are fascinated by their own destruction, and diabetics are no exception. More particularly, people are fascinated by society’s hypothetical destruction, and what human life would look like afterwards. Books, movies, and video games that depict post-apocalyptic worlds are often successful (financially if not artistically), and it’s easy to see why: there’s an undeniable appeal to imaginatively putting yourself in such a bleak, dangerous world and moving around in it. Perhaps this is because we know that industrial civilization has choked the mystery out of the world, and a post-apocalyptic landscape is the most plausible version of a world in which we’d be able to confront something unknown again. Industrial civilization, however, has also kept Type 1 diabetes from becoming a private, miniature apocalypse for its sufferers (it was such an apocalypse for most of human history). The thing that draws us to imagine the apocalypse is also the thing that keeps us (diabetics) alive. It’s a tough paradox. If civilization failed, if the medical scaffolding around diabetic life fell away, I suspect diabetics would be screwed. But how screwed? This is something I think about fairly often. How long would I, a Type 1 diabetic, survive after an apocalypse? If insulin supplies dwindled to nothing, how long could I run around hunting rats, squabbling with other looters and training an army of dogs to do my bidding? How long would it take before I became an unusually sweet snack for cannibals? This all depends, of course, on the human body’s capacity to survive without any insulin. Before I talked to anyone about this subject, I knew that a diabetic would die pretty quickly without insulin, but I assumed that there were things you could Continue reading >>

How Long Can A Type 1 Diabetic Go Without Insulin

How Long Can A Type 1 Diabetic Go Without Insulin

How long can a type 1 diabetic go without insulin How long can a type 1 diabetic go without insulin? I will be given an MRI this week that is an hour and 30 minutes long and cannot wear my insulin pump. I am not wanting to take insulin before as I cannot stop the test in the event of a low blood sugar. How long have you taken your insulin pump off for? Would taking it off for this period of time and then putting it back on put me at risk or just a high blood sugar? Youll be fine. If your blood Gluccose levels are a bit elevated after the test, correct accordingly. Put it in perspective; type 1 diabetics survived for a long, long time long before home testing was even possible and much longer than that before insulin pumps were even imagined It would probably take a few days before you become deathly ill. A few hours before you become real high and start feeling sick. An hour or two may cause your blood sugar to rise, but it should be easy enough to correct after the test. You can go without insulin for an hour and a half. For me, if I could, I would eat just before (taking insulin with it). This would probably make you go a bit high, but high is better than low short-term. The only insulin you'll be missing is your basal. I went without insulin for about 4 or 5 hours once when I had a persistent low. My thought was, "If I've got too much insulin (and am going low) the last thing I need is my pump. I had an MRI about a year ago. Removed my Omnipod. I went slightly high and was easily able to correct it afterwards. It should be fine. There is no real answer to this question, it's so very individual. But I do not take insulin before I disconnect for MRI or x-ray, unless the bg is high of course. My experience with MRI or imaging has never been more than an hour. The techs Continue reading >>

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

Swallowing pills, checking your blood sugar all the time, or sticking yourself with needles full of insulin probably doesn't sound like your idea of a good time. But taking steps to keep your diabetes under control is your best shot at preventing a slew of frightening complications. If you don't take care of yourself, "diabetes complications typically start within 5 years; within 10 to 15 years, the majority of patients will progress to have multiple health issues," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Fortunately, eating a nutritious diet, exercising, and taking your medication may not only stop complications from progressing, but can also reverse them, she says. Need motivation to stick to your treatment plan? Here's what can happen when you slack off. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar; with type 2 diabetes, your body can't properly use the insulin you do produce. In turn, your HDL (or "good") cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure. As a result, about 70% of people with either type of diabetes also have hypertension—a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. (Add these 13 power foods to your diet to help lower blood pressure naturally.) Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. More than 4 million people with diabetes have some degree of retinopathy, or dam Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Here’s what you need to know about the life-threatening diabetes complication called diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Symptoms can take you by surprise, coming on in just 24 hours or less. Without diabetic ketoacidosis treatment, you will fall into a coma and die. “Every minute that the person is not treated is [another] minute closer to death,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when your body doesn’t produce enough insulin. (Diabetic ketoacidosis most often affects people with type 1 diabetes, but there is also type 2 diabetes ketoacidosis.) Without insulin, sugar can’t be stored in your cells to be used as energy and builds up in your blood instead. Your body has to go to a back-up energy system: fat. In the process of breaking down fat for energy, your body releases fatty acids and acids called ketones. Ketones are an alternative form of energy for the body, and just having them in your blood isn’t necessarily harmful. That’s called ketosis, and it can happen when you go on a low-carb diet or even after fasting overnight. “When I put people on a restricted diet, I can get an estimate of how vigorously they’re pursuing it by the presence of ketones in the urine,” says Gerald Bernstein, MD, an endocrinologist and coordinator of the Friedman Diabetes Program at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. RELATED: The Ketogenic Diet Might Be the Next Big Weight Loss Trend, But Should You Try It? But too many ketones are a problem. “In individuals with diabetes who have no or low insulin production, there is an overproduction of ketones, and the kidneys can’t get rid of them fast enough,” sa Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Die Without Insulin? – When Do Diabetics Need Insulin

How Long Does It Take To Die Without Insulin? – When Do Diabetics Need Insulin

When Do Diabetics Need Insulin Once a diabetic takes insulin, it is important to eat something within 30 minutes before blood sugar 22 Nov 2016 simply, without the person with type 1 diabetes not can survive I'm sure they will register soon. If you're just curious, this type 1 will die without insulin. I have forgotten my insulin before and it does not take long for bs to start shooting April 6, 2010. Many teenagers get tired of taking photos as & # 39; experiment & # 39; with omission. Sometimes, at the beginning, the pancreas still produce a little insulin, so they can take oral medications. 16 aug 2013 diabetics can not go without food for a long time. Mar 2013 How long can the body survive without insulin and what could a reading take? Your findings might surprise you even bust myth or two. How long could we last without insulin? Type 1 diabetes, guys, if I stop taking insulin, what will happen? ? ? ? ? Or it should be of type of life expectancy and 2. My sister died because she did not take diabetes seriously. Daily mail of the nation of apocalypse insulin t1d zombie apocalypse. It can be quick, but if I had to forget my long-acting basal insulin, the sugars would go through the roof in a short time. September 2013, while life without insulin was inconceivable, a group of researchers, directed leptin offers two advantages: it does not cause hypoglycemia and people with type 1 diabetes would die on the day or. Run of hordes of zombies will have different priorities than people without 2 Jun 2016 if you do not take care of yourself, the complications of diabetes usually start within 5 with type diabetes, your body can not properly use the insulin they produce. How did diabetic people survive without insulin therapy in the past life? Is it possible how long can insuli Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Our Lifespan Sans Insulin?

Ask D'mine: Our Lifespan Sans Insulin?

Got questions about navigating life with diabetes? Ask D'Mine! Our weekly advice column, that is — hosted by veteran type 1,diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil offers some thoughts on that universal question: "How long can I really go without insulin?" Please take a read; his findings might surprise you and even bust a myth or two. But as a precautionary reminder: this topic would fall into the category of "Don't try this at home"! {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Jake, type 1 from Minneapolis, writes: I've had diabetes for 18 years and I had someone ask me a question the other day that I didn't really have an answer to. The question was how long I would be able to survive without any insulin. I told them 3-4 days, but I don't know if this is true. Any info from a cinnamon whiskey swizzling T1? [email protected] D'Mine answers: If Tom Hanks' character in Castaway had been one of us, he would've never lived long enough to go half-crazy and end up talking to a volleyball named Wilson. OK, so that's a mixed blessing. But I guess the lesson there is: don't get washed up on a deserted island if you can avoid it. To be honest, like you, I had always pegged my zero-insulin survival time in the "couple of days" zone; but once I got to thinking about your question I realized that I didn't know how I knew that, where I learned it, or if it was even correct at all. So I set out to do some fact-checking. Now, as background for you sugar-normals, type 2s, and type 3s—in type 1s like Jake and me, if we run out of insulin hyperglycemia sets in. That leads to diabetic ketoacidosis (known as DKA by its friends), which then (untreated) leads to death. This is old news. But how fast is the process, really? Well, there are a number of variables, Continue reading >>

Taking Care Of Diabetes

Taking Care Of Diabetes

Since our pancreas does not make insulin, we have to take insulin as medicine so that glucose can get from our blood and into our cells to give us energy to do things. Your doctor will tell you how much insulin you need. It can be a little scary at first and there is a lot to understand, that’s why I am here, to help you know what you need to learn. Testing Blood Glucose Because diabetes affects the glucose in your blood, it is important to measure this with a blood glucose meter. You will get used to having your blood glucose meter with you all of the time because checking your glucose level is the only way to know if your diabetes is under control. You always need some glucose in your blood, but not too much. If your blood glucose gets too high or too low it can make you feel sick so you will always want to avoid that. Your doctor will tell you what your glucose levels should be. Low Blood Glucose Low blood glucose happens when you take more insulin than your body needs. It means that too much glucose moved from your blood into your cells, not leaving enough glucose back in the blood (called hypoglycemia). This can be very dangerous. If your blood glucose is low you may feel shaky, start sweating, get a headache, feel dizzy, or your heart may start pounding. These are called symptoms, and they warn you that you need to eat or drink some sugar right away. High Blood Glucose High blood glucose happens when you don’t take enough insulin – when there is too much glucose in your blood (called hyperglycemia). High blood glucose levels can be harder to notice at first, another reason why it is important to test your blood glucose often. Most of the time, you can take insulin so that your high glucose goes down. But if you don’t take insulin and your blood glucose sta Continue reading >>

The High Price Of Insulin Is Literally Killing People

The High Price Of Insulin Is Literally Killing People

Diabetics stretching their doses should be scared of the GOP’s health plan. Micaela Marini Higgs Apr 5 2017, 12:00pm Image: JEAN-FRANCOIS MONIER / Stringer / Getty Shane Patrick Boyle died on March 18th, 2017, from Type I Diabetes. Not from late-in-life complications from the disease, or from some unexpected situation—Boyle died because he was $50 short of reaching his $750 GoFundMe goal to pay for a month's supply of insulin, the drug necessary to keep diabetics alive. After presumably stretching the meds he had as long as they could possibly go, he developed diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a fatal complication that results from the body being unable to move glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's needed. Advertisement Boyle had recently relocated from Houston, Texas, to Mena, Arkansas, so he could be with his ailing mother Judith, who died a week before Shane did. By crossing state lines, he lost his prescription benefits. The cause of his death, really, was complications from waiting for his new healthcare status to be approved. When you're on an ACA plan without an out-of-state network, you can only use their insurance for emergency or urgent care, not prescriptions, says Obianuju Helen Okoye, a public health physician and healthcare consultant in St. Louis, Missouri. Even when people think their plan has out-of-state coverage, that isn't always the case, since multi-state plans "don't necessarily have network providers or cover services in multiple states," according to healthcare.gov. In both of these scenarios, patients pay for prescriptions like insulin out of pocket. Type 1 diabetes, which according to the CDC accounts for about 5 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, is an autoimmune condition in which the body attacks and destroys the insul Continue reading >>

How Long Could We Last Without Insulin?

How Long Could We Last Without Insulin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I as thinking, dangerous for me know lol, How long could we stay alive if all insulin ran out, due to war or a disaster? Please let me know your views on this. Thanks. Historically speaking, patients were placed on low cal diets, iv saline, and some lasted 1-2 years, those were new diabetics. They would all die from shock, dehydration, DKA, or when body weight dropped by 60 %. This was 1870-1920 before the discovery of insulin. Depressing question but with pre-existing Diabetes, I'd say not long, one to two weeks with no IV fluid in a so called disaster scenario. I wonder about that too sometimes. When I had better insurance I used to try to save aside some of my supplies each time I ordered, and I actually had some stores of strips and some syringes and insulin....but insurance and prescriptions changed, and now I have to be careful to have enough of everything to last. I hope I'm never in that situation, because I'm afraid Trev is probably right. Good question, I guess we do not think about it enough. It can never happen, right? OK, I have "safe up" about 6 weeks of supplies in the last 15 month since on insulin and the pump. That is from my monthly supplies that I do not use up a full bottle of insulin or an entire box of infusion set. That is my life line if we are in an emergency situation. Background Info == I am a T2 and become insulin dependent some years ago. I can not get my a1c down with oral meds. Finally I get my doctor to agree to further testing to confirm my pancreas is going out. Since I am on insulin, I had disconnect myself twice from the pump for an extended period of time Continue reading >>

More in insulin