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Can You Develop Gestational Diabetes Late In Pregnancy?

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

32 - 36 Weeks The Toughest Time...

Between 32 - 36 weeks are what we know to be the toughest time for gestational diabetes. It's at around this point that we typically see insulin resistance worsen. You think you have your gestational diabetes diet sussed out and you can literally wake and eat the same breakfast you've been tolerating well for weeks on end and get crazy blood sugar levels?! What the heck is going on and what did you do wrong???... Firstly, you've done NOTHING wrong! This is to be expected and is completely normal and typical with gestational diabetes. To understand what's going on, we need to understand a bit about gestational diabetes and how it works... Gestational diabetes is a progressive condition Gestational diabetes typically presents itself between 24 - 28 weeks. It is for this reason that it is around this time where screening for gestational diabetes typically takes place. It should be noted that insulin resistance can be detected much earlier than this time also, especially in subsequent pregnancies where the mother previously had gestational diabetes. Many ladies are told that earlier diagnosis means that they may have undiagnosed Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. We have found that this is not the case when ladies are tested following the birth of their baby and so we advise not panicking and waiting until you have your post birth diabetes testing before causing yourself too much distress. Further information on post birth diabetes testing can be found here. Gestational diabetes is caused by increased hormones levels from the placenta that cause insulin resistance. Those diagnosed with gestational diabetes are not able to increase insulin production to meet the additional requirement, or they cannot use the insulin which has been made effectively and so blood sugar levels remain to Continue reading >>

What Might Go Wrong In The Third Trimester?

What Might Go Wrong In The Third Trimester?

Weeks 28 through 40 bring the arrival of the third trimester. This exciting time is definitely the home stretch for expectant mothers, but it also presents a time where complications can occur. Just as each trimester can bring its own challenges, so can the third trimester. Prenatal care is especially important in the third trimester because the types of complications that can arise at this time are more easily managed if detected early. You’ll likely start visiting your obstetrician every other week from 28 to 36 weeks, then once per week until your little one arrives. According to the American Diabetes Association, as many as 9.2 percent of pregnant women have gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs because the hormonal changes of pregnancy make it more difficult for your body to effectively use insulin. When insulin cannot do its job of lowering blood sugar to normal levels, the result is abnormally high glucose (blood sugar) levels. Most women have no symptoms. While this condition is usually not dangerous for the mother, it poses several problems for the fetus. Specifically, macrosomia (excessive growth) of the fetus can increase the likelihood of cesarean delivery and the risk of birth injuries. When glucose levels are well-controlled, macrosomia is less likely. At the beginning of the third trimester (between weeks 24 and 28), all women should get tested for gestational diabetes. During the glucose tolerance test (also known as the screening glucose challenge test), you will consume a drink that contains a certain amount of glucose (sugar) and at a specified time later your doctor will test your blood sugar levels. For the oral glucose tolerance test, your blood sugar levels are checked after you have fasted for at least eight hours and you’ve drank Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Diabetes During Pregnancy (gestational Diabetes)

Diabetes During Pregnancy (gestational Diabetes)

Diabetes during pregnancy (Gestational Diabetes) Diabetes during pregnancy (Gestational Diabetes) I have just been diagnosed with gestational diabetes; however, it was detected late in my pregnancy I am at thirty-two weeks. Normally, diagnosis comes at twenty-eight weeks or prior. I am worried that I may have been diabetic for a long period of time, and am worried about how my baby may have been affected so far. All I have learned so far is that it can cause big babies, and potential respiratory problems. I am going to see a health care person at the gestational diabetes clinic tomorrow to be put on a special diet. I would appreciate any information you can provide me with on this topic. Thank you. It's understandable that you're concerned about your and your baby's health; bringing a new life into the world can be both emotionally and physically draining! It's better that you were diagnosed a little later than not at all, however, and the good news is that you now know of your condition and can manage its effects and development to keep you and your baby in the best health possible. Gestational diabetes (GD) occurs when an expectant woman's placental hormones cause her body's cells to be more resistant to insulin and, therefore, glucose absorption. As the baby continues to grow and more hormones are produced, the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to account for the cells' resistance. About 3 to 5 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop GD, usually after their 20th week of pregnancy. Some risks associated with gestational diabetes include being older than 25 years, overweight, or having a personal or family history of diabetes. Unlike types 1 and 2 diabetes, GD does not usually present itself with typical symptoms such as extreme thirst and increase Continue reading >>

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Early Detection: Gestational Diabetes & Preeclampsia

Diabetes and preeclampsia are among two of the reasons why regular prenatal visits are so important. Gestational Diabetes: The Basics Chances are you'll sail through pregnancy without trouble. But even if you're feeling great, you should still seek regular prenatal care because some health problems that could hurt your baby are symptomless. These include gestational diabetes, which raises blood sugar levels during pregnancy, and preeclampsia, a form of high blood pressure. But with early detection and treatment, you can manage these problems and still have a healthy baby. What Is It? Gestational diabetes occurs when pregnancy hormones interfere with the body's ability to use insulin, the hormone that turns blood sugar into energy, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Each year, up to 4 percent of women develop this serious illness in pregnancy. While most women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, a small number may experience extreme hunger, thirst, or fatigue. How Do I Know If I Have It? Your doctor will probably screen you for gestational diabetes between your 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. If you have certain risk factors (see "Who's at Risk?" below), your doctor may opt to screen you sooner. During your screening, you'll drink a sugary liquid, then take a blood test. If your blood sugar levels appear high, you'll need to take a longer test, during which you'll drink more liquid and your blood sugar will be tested several times to determine whether you have gestational diabetes. What Are the Risks Associated with It? Women who fail to seek treatment for gestational diabetes run the risk of giving birth to big babies (9 pounds or more), since much of the extra sugar in the mother's blood ends up going to the fetus. Larger babies are more likely to suffer b Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Diabetes In Pregnancy

Gestational diabetes refers to diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies, usually in the second half of the pregnancy. It almost always goes away as soon as your baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated during your pregnancy, you may experience some complications. Causes Pregnancy hormones cause the body to be resistant to the action of insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas that helps your body use the fuels supplied by food. The carbohydrates you eat provide your body with a fuel called glucose, the sugar in the blood that nourishes your brain, heart, tissues and muscles. Glucose also is an important fuel for your developing baby. When gestational diabetes occurs, insulin fails to effectively move glucose into the cells that need it. As a result, glucose accumulates in the blood, causing blood sugar levels rise. Diagnosis Gestational diabetes is diagnosed with a blood test. Your blood glucose level is measured after you drink a sweet beverage. If your blood sugar is too high, you have gestational diabetes. Sometimes one test is all that is needed to make a definitive diagnosis. More often, an initial screening test is given and, if needed, a longer evaluation is performed. Gestational diabetes usually does not occur until later in pregnancy, when the placenta is producing more of the hormones that interfere with the mother's insulin. Screening for gestational diabetes usually takes place between weeks 24 to 28. However, women at high risk are usually screened during the first trimester. Risk Factors There are a number of risk factors associated with gestational diabetes, including: Being overweight Giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Having a parent or siblin Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Pass The Gestational Diabetes Screening And Still Have Gd?

Is It Possible To Pass The Gestational Diabetes Screening And Still Have Gd?

Is it possible to pass the Gestational Diabetes screening and still have GD? Subject: Is it possible to pass the Gestational Diabetes screening and still have GD? I passed the 18-week (have a strong history in my family) and 27 week screenings, but still wonder. Aren't blood sugar heavily influenced by things like exercise, what you ate the day before, stress, etc? Can you pass the GD tests but still have GD? Subject: Re:Is it possible to pass the Gestational Diabetes screening and still have GD? Yes, well at least I was diagnosed later as borderline. They tested me again because my baby was measuring large and I had extra amniotic fluid. Although I had tested negative the first two tests, this later one (at about 34 weeks) was borderline. Because of the other two issues (baby's size and amniotic fluid) they treated me as if I had it and put me on a GD diet. Later I had to take Glyburide. I could easily control my blood sugar through diet all day, but my morning sugar levels (after not eating all night) were high. And there was nothing I could do about those (was already on modified bed rest so exercise was out of the question). Subject: Re:Is it possible to pass the Gestational Diabetes screening and still have GD? Yes, absolutely. I passed the 3-hour test in my first pregnancy but I know I later went on to develop GD (I'm sure all the cake and ice cream I was eating didn't help). They test at around 28 weeks in order to catch as many cases as possible, but it is definitely still possible for blood sugar to rise to unhealthy levels after that point. It doesn't help that many women -- like I did the first time around -- take passing the test as a license to eat as much junk food as they want. Of course, if the Western diet weren't so simple carb-laden and unhealthy to Continue reading >>

Anyone Developed Gestational Diabetes Late In Pregnancy (after 37 Weeks)?

Anyone Developed Gestational Diabetes Late In Pregnancy (after 37 Weeks)?

Been refered for a GTT later this week and getting myself in a compete state about the results and what is means for me and baby. Was anyone else diagnosed late in pregnancy and what happened? Can't ask my midwife as she is completely unapproachable and useless. Going mad here wondering what happens and what might go wrong. I did - well, at about 35 - 36 weeks. Everything was fine - I was able to control it with diet (they give you a litle finger prick monitor and you have to monitor your blood sugar at intervals throughout the day) I was able to keep mine at normal levels just by not eating carbs - like bread, potatoes etc. To be honest it wasn't that hard as it was only for a few weeks. They probably wouldn't put you straight onto insulin until they see how bad it is and you should have a good chance of being allowed to diet control if you do have it. The only problem really with getting it this late is that your baby might be bigger than average and the medics will fret about this. Unfortunately for me the docs went in for a bit of scare mongering and told me that my baby was going to be huge. I really felt that he wasn't but they wanted me to be induced and I didn't argue. That wasn't a particularly nice birth experience and when he came out he was only 7lbs 15. If I knew then what I know now I would have refused it. Apart from that there was absolutely no effect on the baby oh - and one good side effect of having GD was that I got loads of extra monitoring in the last couple of weeks. It really isn't the end of the world - if you do have it don't worry - so long as you eat the right things it won't cause a problem and it will be over before you know it. Thank you for that - it helps to hear someone elses experience. I can't believe how worked up I am getting mysel Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Overview Gestational diabetes develops during pregnancy (gestation). Like other types of diabetes, gestational diabetes affects how your cells use sugar (glucose). Gestational diabetes causes high blood sugar that can affect your pregnancy and your baby's health. Any pregnancy complication is concerning, but there's good news. Expectant women can help control gestational diabetes by eating healthy foods, exercising and, if necessary, taking medication. Controlling blood sugar can prevent a difficult birth and keep you and your baby healthy. In gestational diabetes, blood sugar usually returns to normal soon after delivery. But if you've had gestational diabetes, you're at risk for type 2 diabetes. You'll continue working with your health care team to monitor and manage your blood sugar. Symptoms For most women, gestational diabetes doesn't cause noticeable signs or symptoms. When to see a doctor If possible, seek health care early — when you first think about trying to get pregnant — so your doctor can evaluate your risk of gestational diabetes as part of your overall childbearing wellness plan. Once you're pregnant, your doctor will check you for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. If you develop gestational diabetes, you may need more-frequent checkups. These are most likely to occur during the last three months of pregnancy, when your doctor will monitor your blood sugar level and your baby's health. Your doctor may refer you to additional health professionals who specialize in diabetes, such as an endocrinologist, a registered dietitian or a diabetes educator. They can help you learn to manage your blood sugar level during your pregnancy. To make sure your blood sugar level has returned to normal after your baby is born, your health care team wil Continue reading >>

Are We Testing For Gestational Diabetes Too Late?

Are We Testing For Gestational Diabetes Too Late?

A new study shows that babies are already showing the effects of gestational diabetes by the time expectant moms are tested for it. So are we testing too late? No one likes the glucose tolerance test—having to chug down that nasty orange drink, and hoping there are no side effects. Unfortunately, screening for high blood sugar is a necessity in pregnancy, as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) can cause problems ranging from stillbirth to childhood obesity. But a new study published in journal Diabetes Care suggests that unborn babies are showing the effects of GDM before expectant mothers are even tested for it, throwing the screening's relevance into question. Should pregnant women be tested even earlier? Diagnosis after baby is already affected Researchers looked at data from over 4,000 pregnant women to measure baby's growth, as large size is an indicator of gestational diabetes, and compared that info to the 171 moms who actually developed GDM later on. They also looked at which women were obese, another risk factor for GDM. "Gestational diabetes and obesity were both associated with accelerated growth of the [baby's] abdomen between 20 and 28 weeks," study author Gordon Smith, M.D., Ph.D., the head of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Cambridge in the UK, tells Fit Pregnancy. "In relation to gestational diabetes, measurements were normal at 20 weeks, but were large by 28 weeks. Women who were both obese and had a diagnosis of gestational diabetes were almost five times more likely to have a baby with a large abdominal measurement at 28 weeks." Because GDM wasn't actually diagnosed in the women until 28 weeks, "the effects of gestational diabetes [are] already present at the time we normally make the diagnosis," Dr. Smith says. Alth Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes definition and facts Risk factors for gestational diabetes include a history of gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy, There are typically no noticeable signs or symptoms associated with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause the fetus to be larger than normal. Delivery of the baby may be more complicated as a result. The baby is also at risk for developing low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) immediately after birth. Following a nutrition plan is the typical treatment for gestational diabetes. Maintaining a healthy weight and following a healthy eating plan may be able to help prevent or minimize the risks of gestational diabetes. Women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is diabetes, or high blood sugar levels, that develops during pregnancy. It occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. It is usually diagnosed in the later stages of pregnancy and often occurs in women who have no prior history of diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is thought to arise because the many changes, hormonal and otherwise, that occur in the body during pregnancy predispose some women to become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by specialized cells in the pancreas that allows the body to effectively metabolize glucose for later usage as fuel (energy). When levels of insulin are low, or the body cannot effectively use insulin (i.e., insulin resistance), blood glucose levels rise. What are the screening guidelines for gestational diabetes? All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Most pregnant women are tested between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy (see Continue reading >>

Can You Develop Gd After Testing Negative??

Can You Develop Gd After Testing Negative??

Can you develop GD after testing negative?? Hi all, FTM wondering if it's possible to develop gestational diabetes later in pregnancy? I got the test back at around 27 weeks but I'm worried about it developing between now (I'm 34 weeks) and when the baby is born. Does anyone know?? Yes you can still develop it later on in your pregnancy. High blood pressure will be one of the first signs I asked my doctor this and he said no. Because of the fact that the hormone that causes gestational diabetes is produced between weeks 24 and 28 so if you test negative at that time then you don't have it. That's what he told me. You absolutely can. I was tested at 28 weeks with my first and I got it around 30 weeks. Unfortunately it was missed and I gained 100 lbs. I have always had super low BP and therefor BP wasn't an indicator for me. I used to go hypo and had excessive weight gain -- it was horrible Yes. Happened to my mom (I ended up being 10lbs 7oz). Although I've read that having GD can increase your risk for pre-eclampsia, high BP is not a sign of GD. I have GD (diagnosed around 28 weeks) and my BP is always low. I spoke to a co-worker yesterday whose daughter developed it later as well. Yes, you can develop GD later in pregnancy. I was tested at 28 weeks and passed my one hour test. At 32 weeks I had an ultrasound and had high amniotic fluid levels, a possible symptom of GD. So my doctor sent me to do the 2 hour test and I failed. I had developed GD. I guess your insulin resistance can increase as your pregnancy progresses. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect This mom found out late in her pregnancy that she had gestational diabetes and was shocked and in denial over her diagnosis, until she found the silver lining. I'd never failed a test in my whole life, and the very thought used to give me nightmares at school. That all changed when I was pregnant with my first baby. I failed the one-hour sugar test that screens expectant moms for gestational diabetes . And though I passed the subsequent three-hour version, I failed both of them again later in my pregnancy by just a number or two. It was confirmed, according to my doctor: I had GD. To say I was stunned and terribly upset would be an understatement. I'd been lucky enough to get pregnant over the age of 35 with no trouble at all, and things had been going so smoothly until then. I wasn't overweight and didn't have a history of diabetes in my family. I was exercising regularly, eating healthily, and had tons of energy. My only risk factor for gestational diabetes was my age, and I had no symptoms. So how could this be happening to me? I listened numbly over the phone as my OB delivered the bad news and informed me of what I had to do. I honestly couldn't believe it. The results had to be wrong. Maybe they got my sample mixed up with someone else's in the lab? Or maybe my doctor was being overzealous because of how old I was. Plus, I'd passed the three-hour screening earlier on. Wasn't that enough? I told her how upset I was and expressed my doubts about the accuracy of the diagnosis. She listened, but firmly stuck to her read of my condition. Eventually, I realized I had no choice but to accept it and do everything I was told to do. I had to pri Continue reading >>

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