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Can Type 2 Diabetes Lead To Amputation?

Diabetes And Amputation

Diabetes And Amputation

Tweet Diabetes, when present in the body over many years, can give rise to all sorts of complications. These include heart disease, kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy. If left untreated, some of these complications can become extremely damaging to the body. Diabetes is a leading cause of amputation The NHS reports that people who have diabetes are 15 times more likely to undergo amputations than other people without the condition. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of amputation of the lower limbs throughout the world. Charity Diabetes UK notes that problems of the foot are the most frequent reasons for hospitalisation amongst patients who have diabetes. Many hospital visits due to diabetes-related foot problems are preventable through simple foot care routines. All people who have diabetes should have foot check-ups as a part of their regular care routine. What factors lead to amputation? Several key factors usually predispose ulceration and ultimately amputation. These include: Circulation problems Other damage to the foot How are these factors assessed? Diabetic foot complications are more common amongst the elderly, and amputation rates do increase with age. For people over 75 years old, the risk does increase considerably. All people who have diabetes should have a basic education in foot care, and beyond this they should have regular foot examinations. The risk for the development of ulceration can be assessed by basic clinical examination of the foot. What are major and minor amputations? Amputations in general, not just diabetes-related amputations, are classed as major and minor. Minor amputation regards removal of toes or feet. Major amputation refers to the above or below the knee amputation. How should I identify a foot at risk from amputation? Lo Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Protect Your Feet And Legs

Diabetes: Protect Your Feet And Legs

If you have diabetes, you are more likely than people without this disorder to develop leg and foot problems. Diabetes can destroy nerves and cause you to have poor circulation. Left unchecked, these complications can lead to amputation. But there's a lot you can do to prevent that from happening. How Diabetes Causes Limb Problems First, it's important to understand what causes these diabetes complications. According to Marilyn Tan, MD, an endocrinologist and the clinic chief of the Stanford Endocrine Clinic in California, risk factors include poor circulation from atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease, poor wound healing, and uncontrolled blood sugar increases, which increases the risk of infection. “Think of sugar as fuel for bacteria and fungus,” says Dr. Tan. Researchers also know that high blood glucose levels can cause nerve damage called diabetic neuropathy. The damage can occur in any part of your body, but it is most common in your arms and legs, with the lower extremities affected first. This type of nerve damage is known as peripheral neuropathy. Some people have no symptoms, while others experience numbness, tingling, burning, sharp pain, cramps, extreme sensitivity when touched, and a loss of coordination and balance. When you have peripheral neuropathy, small sores can go unnoticed because of the numbness — you simply don’t feel them. Left untreated, these little problems can become major infections that invade the bones. What’s more, poor circulation from diabetes means any ulcers and infections are harder to heal. If an infection invades your bones, then amputation could be required to save your life. “Diabetes is the leading cause of nontraumatic lower extremity (leg and foot) amputations in the United States,” says Tan. “Five perc Continue reading >>

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Cause Your Feet To Go Numb?

Why Does Type 2 Diabetes Cause Your Feet To Go Numb?

Numbness in the feet is a symptom of neuropathy or nerve damage, one of the most common long-term complications of type 2 diabetes. Neuropathy is caused by poor blood sugar control that persists over a long period of time. “The higher the blood sugars and the longer they stay high, the greater the chance of the person developing neuropathy,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at the University Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System in the Bronx, New York. “The nerves that get affected by high sugars tend to be the longest nerves in the body,” explains Dr. Zonszein. These nerves go from the spine to the toes, which is why the feet get affected before the arms or hands. Diabetic neuropathy also tends to be bilateral. “Both feet will be affected equally,” he says. If blood sugar remains poorly controlled, it can lead to serious complications. In the feet, diabetic neuropathy can not only cause numbness but pain and injuries. It can change the shape of your feet, deforming them so they no longer fit into regular shoes. It can also dry out and damage your skin, cause calluses and ulcers on your feet, and interfere with circulation. The numbness also makes it hard to tell if there is a cut or injury which can increase your risk of infections and amputation. People with diabetes are also at an increased risk for amputation. In 2010, approximately 73,000 non-traumatic lower-limb amputations were performed on adults (20 years or older) diagnosed with diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. The good news is that most amputations are preventable when you manage your diabetes well, take good care of your feet, and wear proper footwear. If you have circulatory problems or you’ve alre Continue reading >>

Diabetes Amputation: Its Causes, Symptoms & Risk Factors

Diabetes Amputation: Its Causes, Symptoms & Risk Factors

Diabetes, often commonly referred as a condition where the blood sugar or glucose levels are on a spike has been a major culprit for inducing a whole lot of complications over the years. Diabetes if not cared for or prevented along may result in mammoth complications like kidney issues, eye issues, heart disorders and more. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com But the trend just doesn’t stop there. In severe cases, diabetes often results in damaging the body where amputation remains the only viable option. We here would be dealing with diabetes and its relation to amputation as part of our series of diabetes. We’ll further look into the causes, symptoms and risk factors for amputation and reckon on with the proper advice to help you out. Read along as we present the ‘Diabetes and Amputation: Causes, Symptoms and Risk Factors’. What’s Amputation? Amputation is the process of removing a limb from the body via surgical measures so as to battle the trauma or medical illness. In many of cases, these limbs are removed to help control the pain preceding as a result of a disease like malignancy or gangrene. Amputation has been part of the medical procedure for many centuries and has been a major treatment policy against the limb related problems. As for the minute details, amputation was even practiced as a means of punishment back in the days, but that’s not something we’d be touching on in this segment. Types of Amputation There are two general classifications of amputation as major and minor ones. These types of amputations are not just limited to diabetic cases but include the whole of amputation cases around. We’ll look to list them out with their Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes? Dangerous Condition Affecting Thousands Can Lead To Amputation

What Is Diabetes? Dangerous Condition Affecting Thousands Can Lead To Amputation

Diabetes occurs where there is too much glucose in the blood because the body cannot use it properly. There are two forms of the condition - Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body cannot produce insulin. Around one in 10 people with diabetes have Type 1 and it usually affects children or young adults. Type 1 diabetes means the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin. When insulin is not produced a person’s glucose levels increase, which can result in the body's organs being damaged. People living with Type 1 diabetes are reliant on insulin injections and they need to keep a close eye on their blood glucose levels to ensure they stay balanced. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. However, one man, who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, has cured himself of the disease just by changing his diet. If diabetes is not properly managed it can lead to serious consequences such as sight loss, limb amputation, kidney failure and stroke. Figures have revealed that every week there are over 100 amputations due to people controlling their diabetes poorly. Chris Askew, Chief executive of Diabetes UK, has warned there is a ‘crisis’ surrounding the illness and said people aren’t aware of the seriousness of the condition. There is still a lack of understanding when it comes to people being aware of the seriousness of diabetes and this worries us at Diabetes UK. He said: "There is still a lack of understanding when it comes to people being aware of the seriousness of diabetes and this worries us at Diabetes UK. "There are over four million people living with the condition in the UK. The fact that 4,500 pe Continue reading >>

Some Diabetes Patients Lose Lower Limbs Because Their Skin Changes

Some Diabetes Patients Lose Lower Limbs Because Their Skin Changes

Researchers from the University of Bristol, UK, have discovered why patients with diabetes develop a condition which leads to amputation of the lower limbs. It is caused by an alteration in their skin tissue before leg ulcers develop. It is not uncommon for a person with Diabetes Type 2 to develop an ulcer in the lower limb which does not heal. Eventually, the condition becomes such that the only effective treatment is to amputate below the knee. The best way to prevent an ulcer complication is to lower the patient's blood pressure, glucose and cholesterol. The problem is the condition is often undetected at its early stages. So, effective treatment can sometimes arrive too late. About 15% of people with diabetes who have a foot ulcer will need an amputation. People most at risk of ulcers that lead to limb loss are those with Type 2 diabetes (or adult onset of Type 2). In this study, scientists examined 14 patients with diabetes who had had an amputation below the knee. Skin tissue from their two legs were compared - the leg with the amputation below the knee and the healthy leg. They found that the leg with the amputation below the knee had problems with the connective tissue that supports the skin - the skin had changed. Tissue was being renewed at a much faster rate leading to abnormal collagen. The skin, being weaker, was breaking down faster - a condition which allows ulcers to form more easily. Now that we know why ulcers can happen, it may become easier to find ways of offering treatments which prevent the ulcer from developing in the first place. Understanding what happens in the tissue could allow doctors to develop treatments which prevent ulcers developing, and therefore help patients avoid amputations. Dr. J Tarlton, lead researcher said the results of the s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Amputation: Everything You Need To Know To Avoid Amputation

Diabetes And Amputation: Everything You Need To Know To Avoid Amputation

In this article, we will cover everything that you need to know about how to avoid an extremity amputation due to diabetes. We will cover skin and foot care, what to look for, and when to contact your doctor. We will discuss whether or not you need to see a podiatrist, and what to do if you do have a diabetic foot ulcer. We will look at how to get it treated, so that it heals and doesn’t progress to amputation. We will also look at what to do if you are going to have, or have already had an amputation due to your diabetes. We will look at ways you can become mobile again safely. We will also discuss ways to protect your remaining limbs so that you don’t have another amputation later. We will discuss what to look for related to residual limb care, and how to locate needed resources, such as a physical therapist. In my own experience as a nurse for 22 years, and as a certified diabetes educator, I have seen many people with diabetes lose functional mobility, and even their life, after an amputation. I have seen a person go from having a blister and not even knowing they have diabetes to having a below the knee amputation in under two weeks. In addition, I have worked with people who have been through femoral popliteal bypass surgery, amputation of the toes, then a below the knee amputation. I have watched them come in and out of the hospital until they have an above the knee amputation. With cardiovascular disease, the risk of another amputation is very high. I have watched their pain and suffering, and seen the struggles that their families go through after amputation due to complications of diabetes. I have sat up late with them, while they try to deal with phantom residual limb pain, as their mind plays tricks on them and they feel pain in the already amputated leg Continue reading >>

Fda Warns Of Amputation Risk Linked To Newer Diabetes Drug

Fda Warns Of Amputation Risk Linked To Newer Diabetes Drug

agency officials have directed(www.fda.gov) that a new boxed warning be added to the package label of the medication canagliflozin (Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet XR) to advise prescribers and patients of a heightened risk for leg and foot amputations associated with the drug. Canagliflozin is a member of the class of medications known as sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. Marketed as single-ingredient products or in combination with other diabetes drugs such as metformin, SGLT2 inhibitors are FDA-approved for use in conjunction with diet and exercise to lower blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes -- specifically, by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. The safety and efficacy of SGLT2 inhibitors have not been established in patients with type 1 diabetes, and these drugs are not approved for use in these patients. The MedWatch alert, issued on May 16, was based on results of two large clinical trials -- CANVAS (Canagliflozin Cardiovascular Assessment Study) and CANVAS-R (A Study of the Effects of Canagliflozin on Renal Endpoints in Adult Participants With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus) -- which showed that leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients treated with the drug as in those who took a placebo. Specifically, according to a related FDA drug safety communication,(www.fda.gov) the CANVAS trial found the risks of amputation over a year's time were equivalent to 5.9 out of every 1,000 patients for canagliflozin compared with 2.8 out of every 1,000 patients for placebo. In the CANVAS-R trial, the comparative risks were equivalent to 7.5 per 1,000 patients for canagliflozin and 4.2 per 1,000 patients for placebo. Although amputations involving the toe or middle of the foot were the most common, amputations of the leg -- both Continue reading >>

Treatment Of The Diabetic Foot – To Amputate Or Not?

Treatment Of The Diabetic Foot – To Amputate Or Not?

Go to: Foot ulcers affect one in ten diabetics during their lifetime [1]. Patients with diabetes have increased risk of lower-extremity amputations and the main cause is diabetic peripheral arterial disease accelerated by the direct damage to the nerves and blood vessels by high blood glucose levels. Wound healing is also impaired from affected collagen synthesis [2, 3]. Diabetic vascular disease has three main components: arteritis and small vessel thrombosis; neuropathy (possibly ischaemic in cause); and large vessel atherosclerosis. In combination these are almost bound to cause problems in the weight- bearing areas. The diabetic foot ulcers are often deeper and more frequently infected than other leg ulcers reflecting the severe end vessel ischaemia and opportunistic infection which is the common experience of the diabetic [1–4]. Factors, such as age and the duration of the disease will increase its incidence and risk of death from uncontrolled infection [4, 5]. Once tissue damage has occurred in the form of ulceration or gangrene, the aim is preservation of viable tissue, but the two main threats are infection and ischaemia [3]. Ulcers should not be automatically treated with antibiotics since although as open chronic wounds there may be many commensal organisms, about half are not infected [3–5]. Several foot-ulcer classification methods have been proposed in order to organize the proposed appropriate treatment plan but none have been universally accepted. The Wagner- Meggitt classification is based mainly on wound depth and consists of 6 wound grades (Table 1) [6]. The University of Texas system grades the ulcers by depth, then stages them by the presence or absence of infection and ischaemia [6, 7]. As there is the need for rapid and more appropriate therapy Continue reading >>

25 Must Know Statistics About Amputation Due To Diabetes

25 Must Know Statistics About Amputation Due To Diabetes

25 MUST Know Statistics About Amputation Due to Diabetes Diabetes is a common medical condition in the United States at least 9% of Americans are living with diabetes.[i] Diabetes affects many areas of the body. If youve been diagnosed with diabetes, you need to be aware of your feet and watch out for diabetic foot ulcers. What are diabetic foot ulcers? Diabetic foot ulcers are sores that develop on your feet, and they can develop even from seemingly trivial injuries to the feet. Diabetic foot ulcers are a common cause of amputation due to diabetes. If youre wondering about diabetic foot amputation statistics, be warned: these statistics may seem discouraging. But keep in mind that information can be empowering, and these stats emphasize the importance of seeking medical care for foot ulcers as soon as you notice them. The list also highlights the close connection between peripheral artery disease (PAD) , which involves the blockage of the blood vessels in the legs, and what the likelihood is that diabetic foot ulcers will heal. Hopefully this knowledge will remind you to take care of your feet if you have diabetes. If you have a diabetic foot ulcer that hasnt been treated, show it to your doctor as soon as possible. 25 Statistics Every Person Living with Diabetes Must Know About Amputation There are some surprising statistics about how common diabetic foot ulcers are, how often they can lead to amputation and the ultimate cost of having a foot ulcer that results in an amputation. 1. A foot ulcer is the initial event in more than 85% of major amputations that are performed on people with diabetes.[ii] 2. In the United States, every year about 73,000 amputations of the lower limb not related to trauma are performed on people with diabetes.[i] 3. Of non-traumatic amputat Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetic Amputation Do Not Let It Happen

Type 2 Diabetic Amputation Do Not Let It Happen

Type 2 diabetic amputation can be the result of aging with diabetes. It is a specter that hangs over every older diabetic. The longer you have diabetes, the greater the chance for problems in your feet and legs. Before home glucose monitors were invented, no one could track blood sugar levels several times a day. A daily urine test told you the level of your blood sugar from the day before. It could not give you levels before and after meals, or warn you about low blood sugar. So if a diabetic lived long enough there was a great chance to go through at least one below the knee amputation. The sad fact is that today more than 60% of surgical lower limb amputations happen because of diabetes. In the U.S., there are over 80,000 type 2 diabetic amputations a year from the complications of diabetes. The number is high because there are more type 2 diabetics every year. In 1989, 6.7 million people in the U.S. said they had diabetes. In 1995 the number grew to 8 million. In 2010 18.8 million Americans reported diabetes, but the CDC estimates another 8 million did not know they were diabetic. Better and more accurate testing with the hemoglobin A1C and other tests explains some of the rise but not all. It is scary to talk about type 2 diabetic amputation. But cutting off the leg below the knee was once the medical standard for necrosis (tissue death) in any part of the foot. These days partial foot amputation is the first choice. However, one out of four partial foot amputations fail. Then, about half of diabetics who need amputation are back for another one in less than five years. Why is this? The path to type 2 diabetic amputation usually begins with a foot ulcer from a blister or sore that does not heal. This leads to infection, and flesh and bone begin to die. Without ampu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Gets Fda Warning Due To Amputation Risk

Diabetes Drug Gets Fda Warning Due To Amputation Risk

HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, May 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The type 2 diabetes prescription drug canagliflozin (brand names Invokana, Invokamet, Invokamet XR) appears to increase the risk of leg and foot amputations, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. The FDA is requiring the medications to carry new warnings about the risk. The required warnings on the drug's labeling include the most serious and prominent boxed warning. The agency's decision is based on data from two large clinical trials showing that leg and foot amputations occurred about twice as often in patients taking canagliflozin as among those taking a placebo. Amputations of the toe and middle of the foot were the most common, but leg amputations below and above the knee also occurred. Some patients had more than one amputation, some had amputations involving both limbs, according to the FDA. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps to usher sugar from foods into the body's cells. When this process doesn't work correctly, blood sugar levels rise. Left untreated, high blood sugar levels can cause a number of possible complications, including heart disease, kidney problems and amputations, according to the American Diabetes Association. Canagliflozin is meant to be used with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. It belongs to a class of drugs called sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. These drugs lower blood sugar levels by causing the kidneys to remove sugar from the body through the urine. It is available as a single-ingredient product under the brand name Invokana and also in combination with the diabetes medicine metformin under the brand name Invokamet. Patients taking canagliflozin shoul Continue reading >>

Why Is Foot Care Important If You Have Diabetes?

Why Is Foot Care Important If You Have Diabetes?

Amputation is a major complication of diabetes. If you have diabetes, your doctor has likely recommended that you check your feet each day, but you may not have known why. Read on to learn how diabetes can lead to amputation and how to help prevent it. In some cases, diabetes can lead to peripheral artery disease (PAD). PAD causes your blood vessels to narrow and reduces blood flow to your legs and feet. It may also cause nerve damage, known as peripheral neuropathy. This could prevent you from feeling pain. If you can’t feel pain, you may not realize you have a wound or ulcer on your feet. You may continue putting pressure on the affected area, which can cause it to grow and become infected. Reduced blood flow can slow wound healing. It can also make your body less effective at fighting infection. As a result, your wound may not heal. Tissue damage or death (gangrene) may occur, and any existing infection may spread to your bone. If the infection cannot be stopped or the damage is irreparable, amputation may be necessary. The most common amputations in people with diabetes are the toes, feet, and lower legs. In 2010, 73,000 American adults who have diabetes and are over age 20 had amputations. That may sound like a lot, but amputations account for only a small percentage of the over 29 million people in the United States with diabetes. Better diabetes management and foot care has caused lower limb amputations to be reduced by half over the last 20 years. With ongoing diabetes management, foot care, and wound care, many people with diabetes can limit their risk of amputation or prevent it entirely. The best way to prevent amputation and other severe diabetes complications is to manage your blood sugar. There are several ways you can do this, including: eating a health Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Amputations If You Have Diabetes

How To Avoid Amputations If You Have Diabetes

In people with diabetes, a trifecta of trouble can set the stage for amputations: Numbness in the feet due to diabetic neuropathy (nerve damage) can make people less aware of injuries and foot ulcers. These ulcers may fail to heal, which can in turn lead to serious infections. "Normally a person with an injury on the bottom of their foot, such as a blister, will change the way they walk. Your gait will alter because you are going to protect that blistered spot until it heals up," says Joseph LeMaster, MD, an assistant professor at the University of Missouri–Columbia School of Medicine. "People with a loss of sensation don't do that. They will just walk right on top of that blister as though it wasn't there. It can burst, become infected, and turn into what we call a foot ulcer," he says. "That ulceration can go right down to the bone and become an avenue for infection into the whole foot. That's what leads to amputations." Foot injuries are the most common cause of hospitalizations About 15% of all diabetics will develop a foot ulcer at some point and up to 24% of people with a foot ulcer need an amputation. You're at extra-high risk if you're black, Hispanic, or Native American. These minority populations are two to three times more likely to have diabetes than non-Hispanic whites, and their rates of amputations are higher. "It's the most common reason that someone's going to be hospitalized with diabetesnot for high blood sugar or a heart attack or a stroke," says David G. Armstrong, DPM, a specialist in diabetic foot disease at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science in North Chicago. "It's for a hole in the foot, a wound." About a year ago, Dr. Armstrong treated a 59-year-old man with type 2 diabetes who had been working out at a local health club; 12 Continue reading >>

Explainer: How Diabetic Foot Disease Can Lead To Amputations And Even Death

Explainer: How Diabetic Foot Disease Can Lead To Amputations And Even Death

People with diabetes are prone to foot disease, which can lead to amputations and even death. Australia has the second-highest rate of lower-limb amputations in the developed world – with the rate having risen by 30% over the past decade. This is because as rates of type 1 and 2 diabetes increase, so do the very common related problems of foot health – known as Diabetes-Related Foot Disease (DRFD). Five-year survival rates for those with diabetic foot problems are lower than for prostate, breast and colon cancer, yet the severity of the problem isn’t widely recognised. If you are one of the estimated one million Australians with diabetes, paying close attention to your foot health could save you from serious, sometimes devastating complications. How does diabetes cause foot disease? The most common type of foot disease related to diabetes, affecting up to a quarter of diabetes sufferers, is foot ulcers. These are actually a big financial burden as well. Of the US$116 billion allocated for diabetes care in the United States in 2007, one-third was directed to treat foot ulceration. Here’s why it happens. Diabetic skin contains less of the structural protein collagen than normal skin. This means it becomes fragile, stiff and more prone to breaking. So a diabetic is more likely to experience injury and poor wound healing. Diabetes also increases a person’s risk of developing poor blood circulation by up to four times. Stiffer blood vessels restrict blood supply to tissues in the body. When circulation is poor, injuries such as cuts and blisters are less able to heal and more likely to become infected or turn into ulcers. Wounds related to diabetes most commonly happen on the extremities (feet and lower legs) because these areas are the first to lose feeling and bl Continue reading >>

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