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Can Type 1 Diabetes Be Reversed If Caught Early

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

Has A British Man Really Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes?

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for 25 years now. The relentlessness of type 1, and the fact that I will probably live with this non-preventable condition for the rest of my life never goes away, but I have almost made peace with it. A few days ago, I saw something that gave me pause. “British man with type 1 diabetes to receive tests after coming off insulin,” read Diabetes.co.uk’s headline. The article goes onto say that, “Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again.” My first thoughts upon reading this were, “this can’t be true,” and “what’s the real explanation here?” There are many types of diabetes including type 2, LADA, and monogenic. Maybe he actually had one of those types instead of type 1. Usually, tests can determine this quickly though, so why was it not the case with Dan? I live in the UK and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. I managed to get in touch with ‘Miracle Dan’, as he’s been called by his friends. Although he is saving the specific details of his recent test results from the U.S. for an upcoming exclusive interview with another media outlet, he spoke to me and answered some of my questions about everything that has been happening. Please tell us a bit about yourself and your diabetes. When were you diagnosed? I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes back in February 2011 at the age of 23, after just leaving the army. I started a new engineering job and within two weeks of starting, I noticed the traditional symptoms of type 1 diabetes: thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, and a lot of vomiting. I collapsed and was taken by ambulance to hospital where I wa Continue reading >>

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers May Have Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Image Point Fr/Shutterstock A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes means a lifetime of constant diligence. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 usually develops early in life. Those diagnosed have to check blood sugar several times a day and take insulin as needed; the process is difficult, expensive, and potentially dangerous. That helps explain the excitement about a potential cure for type 1 diabetes using an already approved treatment. Doctors diagnose more than 18,000 children and teens with type 1 diabetes every year, according to the CDC. These kids lack the ability to make enough insulin, the hormone that processes blood sugar. Using insulin injections to control blood sugar with insulin is tricky because diet, exercise, and stress can quickly alter levels. Without enough insulin, kidney, heart, and nerve damage can be the result. Get too much, and blood sugar levels will plummet dangerously low. (This is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes.) Researchers in Israel have tried treating type 1 diabetics with an immune system protein called alpha-1 antitrypsin (alpha-1)—it helps target germs. Normally, insulin gets lower and lower over time in diabetics, but extra alpha-1 seems to help the body produce more. Researchers gave 12 recently diagnosed type 1 diabetics an alpha-1 drip once a week for eight weeks in a study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. For a year and counting following treatment, two of the participants have been making more of their own insulin. Another three saw only minor decreases—which is a good sign. “Compared to the natural course of the disease, which is downhill, even a flat line is considered success,” says study co-author Eli C. Lewis, PhD, biochemical and pharmacology professor at Ben-Gurion University of the N Continue reading >>

Will Diabetes Go Away?

Will Diabetes Go Away?

There is no cure for diabetes. Neither type 1 (juvenile onset or insulin-requiring) diabetes or type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes ever goes away. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period" shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period" diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months to a year. The patient's insulin needs are minimal and some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin. It would be a mistake to assume that the diabetes has gone away, however. Basically, type 1 diabetes occurs when about 90 percent of the body's insulin-producing cells have been destroyed. At the time that type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most patients still are producing some insulin. If obvious symptoms of type 1 diabetes emerge when the patient has an illness, virus or cold, for example, once the illness subsides the body's insulin needs may decrease. At this point, the number of insulin-producing cells remaining may be enough — for the moment — to meet the person's insulin needs again. But the process that has destroyed 90 percent of the insulin-producing cells will ultimately destroy the remaining insulin-producing cells. And as that destruction continues, the amount of injected insulin the patient needs will increase — and ultimately the patient will be totally dependent on insulin injections. Scientists now think that it is important for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to continue taking some insulin by injection even during the honeymoon period. Why? Because they have some scientific evidence to suggest that doing so will help preserve the few remaining insulin-producing cells for a while longer. Patients diagnosed wi Continue reading >>

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Three Articles On Type I Diabetes: Article #1: Introduction to Type I Diabetes (This Article) Article #2: Possible Causes of Type I Diabetes Article #3: The Treatment of Type I Diabetes Introduction to Type I Diabetes Did you know that there are two products that have cured advanced Type I diabetes cases? Both of them will be discussed in this article. But more importantly, one of these products can reverse cumulative severe side-effects of Type I or Type 2 diabetes. Type I diabetes is actually a set of symptoms, meaning it can be caused by several different things. The symptoms are that the blood lacks insulin. There are actually several things that can cause an abnormally low level of insulin in the blood. Type I diabetes is a very severe disease. The average lifespan of Type I diabetic is 5-8 years shorter than an average person. But death is not the worst thing about Type I diabetes. Here is a list of some of the health problems it can lead to: Amputation of limbs Blindness (retinopathy) – diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in America — 12,000 to 24,000 case annually Kidney failure (nephropathy) – frequently leading to dialysis or a kidney/pancreas transplant Liver disease Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) Heart disease Stroke (e.g. paralysis) High blood pressure Nerve damage (neuropathy) Dementia Urinary tract infection (mostly in women) Depression – Note: Aspartame (e.g. Equal, NutraSweet, etc.) and sugar are the leading causes of depression in non-diabetics. However, because the average diabetic consumes more aspartame than the average person, it is highly possible that aspartame is by far the REAL cause of depression in diabetics!! A diabetic should absolutely avoid aspartame and all other artificial sweeteners! Bone quali Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Successfully Reversed With Antibody Therapy; Could There Soon Be A Cure?

Type 1 Diabetes Successfully Reversed With Antibody Therapy; Could There Soon Be A Cure?

Type 1 Diabetes Successfully Reversed With Antibody Therapy; Could There Soon Be A Cure? Researchers have identified an antibody that can reverse the onset of type 1 diabetes in mice models, even after they begin showing signs of it. Now, researchers are trying to determine how to develop the therapy into a successful cure for type 1 diabetes in humans. The study, led by Dr. William Ridgway of theUniversity of Cincinnati,was presented on Saturday at the American Diabetes Association's 74th Scientific Sessions in San Francisco, according to a press release . Type 1 diabetes , which is also known as juvenile diabetes, usually affects children and young adults. It's caused by the body's inability to produce insulin, a hormone needed to break down sugars and starches and transform them into energy. The bodys inability to produce insulin arises from an autoimmune response to insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Typical symptoms include frequent urination, increased thirst, and severe weight loss, in spite of regular diets. The exact cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown, but genetics and exposure to certain viruses are thought to be contributing factors. Still, it's the rarer form of diabetes, with only five percent of people having the chronic condition, which requires continuous administration of insulin. In certain cases, lack of proper care may lead to severe complications like heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure. It is believed that the incidence of type 1 diabetes, and autoimmune diseases in general, have increased in the amount of cases due to under-stimulation of innate immune systems, which trigger autoimmunity in children and young adults. Unlike type 2 diabetes , in which a a person is unable to respond to insulin, type 1 diabetes occurs when the bod Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Type 1 Be Reversed?

Can Diabetes Type 1 Be Reversed?

Mostly it can't be reversed since it's genetic factors but it can be controlled by: 1-eating lots of Vegetables, fruits and low fatty meals 2-reduce your weight by exercising regularly like walking or jogging 3-monitor ur blood glucose readings 4-reduce any type of stress factors I also recommend you use an application which is very useful U can add your daily meals, blood glucose readings It measures your physical activity stepwise Ur family can be added to encourage you and to be notified with everything To keep a record for u and your physician Here's the link Continue reading >>

Natural Diabetes Treatment For Type 1 Diabetics - If You're Not Doing This, You're Not Really Treating Your Diabetes.

Natural Diabetes Treatment For Type 1 Diabetics - If You're Not Doing This, You're Not Really Treating Your Diabetes.

Any diabetes treatment that does not include optimizing your nutrition is not really a treatment. Unfortunately, medicine focusses on keeping your blood sugars within a normal range- as long as that's being accomplished, you're "treated". As usual, this is just a bandaid solution of treating the symptom rather than the underlying problem. Type 1 diabetes used to be called "juvenile diabetes" because it generally affects younger people. Type 1 diabetics don't produce the insulin they need to use the glucose from food that is essential for all body functioning. Unlike type 2 diabetics, who usually have a lot of insulin, but their body isn't able to use it properly. Different causes- same results. Current opinion is that type 1 diabetes is actually an autoimmune disease (the body destroying itself). Partly because over 80% of type 1 diabetics have islet cell antibodies. These antibodies tell your body to attack and destroy the islet cells of your pancreas, which are responsible for making insulin. If caught early enough, a perfect type 1 diabetes treatment would be to stop the autoimmune response. Unfortunately, by the time diagnosis is made, almost all of the islet cells have been destroyed. So there is no other choice at that point but to inject insulin. Preserving as much of your pancreas as possible still makes a lot of sense though. Even tiny amounts of your own insulin could help keep your blood sugar in normal range as well as reduce your insulin requirements. Could it be that those who have an easier time controlling their glucose levels have more functioning islet cells? More research needs to be done for sure. If type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, then antioxidants are an ideal natural diabetes treatment. Traditionally, autoimmune diseases have been contro Continue reading >>

Interview: How 2 Brothers With Type 1 Diabetes Manage It Without Insulin

Interview: How 2 Brothers With Type 1 Diabetes Manage It Without Insulin

I have already written about the Roman’s family here before. Since I found the case of their two sons with type 1 diabetes and how they have approached it very interesting, I interviewed them. You can read the answers here below…I hope you can get inspired or learn something that you can apply to yourself or your children if they have diabetes. Please, share briefly with us who you are and why are you involved in the diabetes world. What type of diabetes do your children have/had and when were they diagnosed? We are Dan and Sally Roman, the parents of two type 1 diabetic children. Dan was the former Vice President of Sales and Marketing for a specialty pharmacy and disposable medical supply company, and Sally was a Registered Nurse before becoming a full time mother to 6 children. Together, we are co-founders of Health-e-Solutions. After quickly experiencing the limits of standard medical practice in natural diabetes management for our two boys diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2008, we researched, uncovered and put together the elements that comprise the Health-e-Solutions Lifestyle. The results surpassed even our expectations, with both boys stable and complication-free since 2008 without exogenous insulin or other medications. Through an ongoing process of diligent investigation, combining allopathic and alternative measures, and experiencing the cause and effect of individual foods, we created and fine-tuned the Health-e-Solutions lifestyle for greater success and easier, more practical application in a busy world. We began getting many calls from people asking how we achieved the success we have enjoyed with our two boys. It got to the point that we could not continue to take calls without a change. So Dan resigned from his previous job so that together we coul Continue reading >>

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

The Stages Of Type 1 Diabetes (it Starts Earlier Than We Thought)

My daughter Bisi was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes three years ago at the age of six. The first night after she was diagnosed, once she finally fell asleep in her hospital bed, tossing and turning despite the IV in her arm, I remember standing outside in the hall with my husband and a couple of medical residents, talking with them about her diagnosis. “Could this have been coming on for a while?” we asked them. I described how for a couple of years, Bisi had been almost unbearably cranky when she was hungry—to the point where I’d asked her pediatrician more than once if something might be wrong. No, the residents told us. Type 1 diabetes comes on very suddenly, in a matter of weeks, as the body’s beta cells suddenly die out under attack from the immune system. Every doctor or nurse we spoke with during the three days in the hospital (except for one, who said that our instincts were probably right), echoed what the two residents, fresh from medical school, told us. But it turns out they were wrong. JDRF and the American Diabetes Association, supported by other organizations in the field, recently put forth a new staging system for type 1 diabetes, where full-blown disease, like what landed Bisi in the hospital, is characterized as stage 3, part of an extended auto-immune process that often starts in infancy. This fall, Dr. Richard Insel, JDRF’s Chief Scientific Officer, explained the classification system to a group of reporters, talking through the importance of early diagnosis, and the hope that diagnosing the disease at an earlier stage could lead to breakthroughs in stopping the beta-cell destruction process—essentially, stopping the disease before it starts. Insel explained that stage 1 is when people test positive for multiple pancreatic islet auto-a Continue reading >>

Can Early Diabetes Be Controlled Or Completely Stopped?

Can Early Diabetes Be Controlled Or Completely Stopped?

Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes is one of the most significant threats to health today. Most cases are linked to the epidemic of obesity. The long-term consequences of diabetes include cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, heart attack and peripheral vascular disease. Diabetes is also a leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and leg amputation. Attention to diet, exercise and even a small weight loss can help someone with diabetes, or especially pre-diabetes. This is a metabolic disease, meaning it is an issue of energy balance. In normal physiology, when the amount of food energy consumed, measured in calories, exceeds the amount of energy burned, the body converts and saves the excess energy as fat. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a resistance to the hormone insulin, which causes sugar or glucose to enter muscle and organs of the body. For reasons that are poorly understood, some people's tissues become less sensitive to insulin as the body stores more fat. The results are a rise in blood sugar levels and the long-term consequences described above. I prefer to think of diabetes as a disease with a white-to-black spectrum of severity and a broad gray area. For those who have pre-diabetes or even mild diabetes, one can take steps to move toward the lighter gray or white area of the spectrum, with small improvements in diet, small increases in activity and loss of just a few pounds. I am hesitant to say that diabetes is cured, but it can often be controlled, and one can return to normal blood sugars without the need for diabetes medicines, and the risk of diabetic complications are significantly reduced. This is rare and more difficult but not impossible for severe diabetics. Many who progress to diabetes could have prevented it by maintaining a lower and not necessaril Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes

Tweet Reversing diabetes is a term that usually refers to a significant long-term improvement in insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes that are able to get their HbA1c below 42 mmol/mol (6%) without taking diabetes medication are said to have reversed or resolved their diabetes. This also known as putting diabetes into remission. Loss of body weight can be particularly beneficial in helping to reverse the progression of diabetes. With time and dedication, type 2 diabetes can be reversed and the results can be very rewarding, with less tiredness and better all-round health. If you think you need to come off your diabetes medication, ensure you speak to your healthcare team before doing so. Understanding how diabetes progresses The most common cause of type 2 diabetes is obesity-related, which generally follows a vicious cycle pattern: Diet high in calories -particularly if high in refined carbohydrates. Insulin levels in the bloodstream rise to cope with the high- and quick-acting carb intake. Weight is gained around the belly (central or truncal obesity). Consistently high insulin levels lead to the body’s cells becoming resistant to insulin and commonly lead to weight gain. High insulin levels also increase weight gain. Insulin resistance leads to an increase in blood sugar levels, particularly after meals. The pancreas produces more insulin to cope with rising blood sugar levels. High sugar levels lead to feelings of lethargy and high insulin levels lead to increased hunger. Hunger often leads to overeating and lethargy, with less physical activity being taken. Overeating, less activity and high insulin levels all lead to further weight gain and more insulin resistance. Consistently high demand on the pancreas to produce ext Continue reading >>

Can You Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Reverse Type 2 Diabetes?

It sounds too good to be true: reversing type 2 diabetes through exercise and healthy eating. While certain lifestyle changes are key to managing diabetes, whether you can actually turn back time so that it's like you never had diabetes is a different matter. That depends on how long you've had the condition, how severe it is, and your genes. "The term 'reversal' is used when people can go off medication but still must engage in a lifestyle program in order to stay off," says Ann Albright, PhD, RD. She's the director of diabetes translation at the CDC. Shedding extra pounds and keeping them off can help you better control your blood sugar. For some people, reaching a healthier weight will mean taking fewer medications, or in rarer cases, no longer needing those medications at all. Losing 5% to 10% of your body weight and building up to 150 minutes of exercise a week may help you to slow or stop the progress of type 2 diabetes. "If you sit [inactive] most of the day, 5 or 10 minutes is going to be great," Albright says. "Walk to your mailbox. Do something that gets you moving, knowing that you're looking to move towards 30 minutes most days of the week." In one study, people with type 2 diabetes exercised for 175 minutes a week, limited their calories to 1,200 to 1,800 per day, and got weekly counseling and education on these lifestyle changes. Within a year, about 10% got off their diabetes medications or improved to the point where their blood sugar level was no longer in the diabetes range, and was instead classified as prediabetes. Results were best for those who lost the most weight or who started the program with less severe or newly diagnosed diabetes. Fifteen percent to 20% of these people were able to stop taking their diabetes medications. Continue reading >>

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Bethesda, Maryland (CNN) -- When Jonathan Legg of Bethesda, Maryland, got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes at 39, he was shocked. "I had always been pretty active," said Legg. "But it was a big wake-up call, that what I was doing and my current weight were not OK." That was two years ago. Since that time, the Morgan Stanley executive decided to make some changes and reverse his diabetes. Although his doctor recommended he go on medication to control his illness, Legg took a different approach. Instead of meds, he began to exercise every day and changed his diet, cutting out alcohol, fatty foods and watching his carbs. Do you have diabetes? How well are you managing it? "I wanted to be able to know the changes I was making were making a difference, and it wasn't the drug," said Legg. According to new statistics just out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.8 million people, or 8.3% of the U.S. population, are affected by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Most, like Legg, have type 2 diabetes, which in many people develops later in life. Caused primarily by genetic makeup, a sedentary lifestyle and poor eating habits, type 2 diabetes can be reversed in some cases. By making changes to their lives such as adding exercise and improving their diets, many type 2 diabetics can drop their glucose or sugar numbers back to the normal range, reversing their condition. "We have seen numerous people reverse their condition," says Dr. Michelle Magee, director of the MedStar Diabetes Institute in Washington. "But it takes a real dedication for the rest of their lives," she notes. So why do exercise and diet help reverse diabetes? To answer that question, we first need to know why people get diabetes in the first place. Diabetes is caused when there is too much glucose Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes Without Insulin Replacement

Reversing Type 1 Diabetes Without Insulin Replacement

Project Researcher: Subhadra Gunawardana, Ph.D. – Washington University, St. Louis Project Description Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a serious disease affecting 3 million Americans, with over 15,000 children being diagnosed each year (1). Traditional treatments involve insulin replacement, either directly or via islet/pancreas transplantation, and have numerous limitations. Exogenous insulin administration is obviously inconvenient, and can be dangerous due to potentially fatal dips in blood glucose. Pancreas transplantation, the only available long-term remedy, requires major invasive surgery. Islet transplantation is safer but less effective, as patients return to diabetes in the long term. Both islet and pancreas transplantation are limited by the availability of donor tissue and the need for life-long immunosuppression. Thus there is an ongoing need for better therapies. The ultimate goal in treating T1D is to restore blood glucose control. We recently demonstrated an entirely novel approach to restore normal blood glucose without insulin, thereby avoiding the aforementioned complications. Transplanting healthy embryonic brown adipose tissue (BAT) under the skin of type 1 diabetic mice results in dramatic restoration of glucose control and reversal of diabetes, with no contribution from insulin. While insulin remains low as is typical with T1D, BAT transplant recipients show progressive weight gain and reversal of all clinical signs of diabetes, accompanied by an increase in healthy fat (adipose tissue) content in the body. Adipose tissue is a versatile endocrine organ which secretes hundreds of hormones affecting all body systems, and exerts a profound influence on blood glucose regulation. Healthy adipose tissue is a powerful asset, which helps improve overall metabo Continue reading >>

Have Researchers Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes? Common Heart Drug Found To Work In Mice And Set For Human Trial

Have Researchers Found A Way To Reverse Type 1 Diabetes? Common Heart Drug Found To Work In Mice And Set For Human Trial

UAB scientists have proved through years of research that high blood sugar causes the body to overproduce a protein called TXNIP, which is increased within the beta cells in response to diabetes, but had never previously been known to be important in beta cell biology. Too much TXNIP in the pancreatic beta cells leads to their deaths and thwarts the body's efforts to produce insulin, thereby contributing to the progression of diabetes. Diabetes, which is the nation's seventh-leading cause of death, raises risks for heart attacks, blindness, kidney disease and limb amputation. Recent federal government statistics show that 12.3 percent of Americans 20 and older have diabetes, either diagnosed or undiagnosed. Another 37 percent have pre-diabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar, up from 27 percent a decade ago. While a new report in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed rates at which new cases are accumulating have slowed in recent years, the numbers remain high and are still increasing overall, with 8.3 percent of adults diagnosed with the disease as of 2012. And no slowing of the disease has been seen in new cases among blacks and Hispanics or in overall rates among people with high school educations or less. Plus, the annual cost to treat the disease is exorbitant and rising. The American Diabetes Association reports that the disease cost the nation $245 billion in 2013. But UAB scientists have also uncovered that the drug verapamil, which is widely used to treat high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat and migraine headaches, can lower TXNIP levels in these beta cells to the point that, when mouse models with established diabetes and blood sugars above 300 milligrams per deciliter were treated with verapamil, the disease was era Continue reading >>

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