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Can The Body Start Producing Insulin Again

Type 1 Diabetes Does Not Mean Your Pancreas Is Dead! We’re Closer To A Cure With Bcg Vaccine

Type 1 Diabetes Does Not Mean Your Pancreas Is Dead! We’re Closer To A Cure With Bcg Vaccine

Send to Kindle My husband has Type 1 Diabetes, and we pay $400 out of pocket every month just for his insulin! I often hear sad stories of diabetics who have lost their limbs or gone blind. I also hear about young kids being diagnosed with the disease, and it makes me sick to my stomach. But, what if my husband, along with the other 1 million type 1 diabetics in the US could get a simple and inexpensive injection to jump start their pancreas? Dr. Denise L. Faustman, Director of the Immunobiology Laboratory of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), has been independently investigating using an 80 year old Tuberculosis vaccination, or BCG, known formally as bacillus Calmette-Guerin, to reverse type 1 diabetes. At first this sounded too good to be true and I hesitated because this potential cure would mean my husband would have to get vaccinations. If you read other articles I’ve written about the dangers of vaccination and the nasty ingredients they are made with, you may understand my hesitation. So, I decided to write to Faustman to ask her about this. I asked if there was a way she could recreate the vaccine to only use the ingredients necessary for the cure. She responded, Remarkably this is such an old vaccine, not much is added, unlike new vaccines. The other ingredients are sodium glutamate, magnesium sulphate, dipotassium phosphate, L-asparagine, ferric citrate, glycerol, citric acid, and water. This is basically salts with a little sugar, so no worries – no mercury, adjuvants, etc. The additives look like what is on the side of an energy drink. Right then I became more interested in the whole idea! Faustman has come a long way and has more than 20 years of research on autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes under her belt. She is very confident and enthusiastic that Continue reading >>

Research Corner: Helping The Pancreas Help Itself

Research Corner: Helping The Pancreas Help Itself

Dr. Claresa Levetan explains how activating a regenerative gene may be the key for T1s to start producing insulin again. It is an exciting time for research into how to treat Type 1 diabetes. I and my fellow researchers at Perle Bioscience, as well as many other researchers, now understand that combining immunotherapy with new therapies discovered by using the Human Genome Project show great hopes of getting the T1 pancreas working again. But before we talk about where we’re going with T1 therapy, it might be helpful to review where we’ve been: On the evening of October 31, 1920, when Dr. Frederick Banting scribbles on a piece of paper that clamping the pancreatic ducts in dogs may lead to a secretion that would help patients with diabetes. Banting had just completed reading an article by Dr. Moses Barron on Islets of Langerhansas in patients who suffered from pancreatic stones that block enzyme secretion. Banting was struck by how the pancreas attempted to heal in reaction to injury. After reading the article, he hypothesized that collecting internal secretions of the pancreas, obtained by tying off the pancreatic ducts of dogs, would lead to a substance that might help patients with diabetes. It may have been a eureka moment, but it wasn’t an easy path from thought to reality. Banting endured many failures in trying to prove this idea, and even had to sell his beat-up Ford to afford his last dogs for study. At last, he was able to prove that the secretions improved glucose levels in dogs. Soon he used his discovery to restore 14-year old Leonard Thompson, who had been on the brink of death from diabetes, back to health. Of course, Banting’s secretions later became known as insulin. In many ways, this was the last great leap forward in diabetes treatments. Sinc Continue reading >>

Pancreas Producing Insulin Again?

Pancreas Producing Insulin Again?

Diabetes Forum • The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community » Im newbie to type 1 diabetes only diagnosed back in May. Everything has been goin great everyone i seen the doctor the nurses and other health pros where pleased with my progress. Up until this week. Around about 3 am Sunday morning i woke up in a HYPO. Blood tested and gave me a reading of 2.8. Kind of scary as this is the lowest i have ever went and strange that i tested before bed and got a reading of 8.0. The HYPOs have continued threw out the week to the point where i have went from 14 units of Lantus and 14 units of Novorapid daily to 4 units of Lantus and practically no Novorapid at all. All this on the instruction of the nurse i spoke to on the phone. She mentioned that due to me only having the condition for 6 months that the pancreas can give out bursts of insulin. Im truly baffled by this. Has anyone ever been threw this sort of thing? How long do these spells normally last for? What would be the next possible step as i am still having hypos? Any advice or information greatly appreciated. As explained kindly by Nigel oddly the pancreas can sometimes get up and go after insulin replacement sort of gives it a rest, like a last stand! Unfortunately this won't last, some people have rumoured to experience so for years but that is very rare, it's quite common for it to happen not long after diagnosis. The main problem is that the honeymooning can be quite erratic and unpredictable, so one minute your pancreas unloads some insulin and you hypo, so next time you compensate then your pancreas decides to sit and do nothing so your BG's obviously will rise. My advice would be that if you can get away with just a small amount on lantus then go Continue reading >>

Is The End Of Insulin Jabs In Sight? New Treatment Made From Diabetics' Skin Could 'reboot' The Pancreas

Is The End Of Insulin Jabs In Sight? New Treatment Made From Diabetics' Skin Could 'reboot' The Pancreas

Hundreds of thousands of diabetics could be freed from insulin injections thanks to a treatment made from their own skin. Scientists have found a way of turning skin cells into healthy pancreatic cells, which could replace those damaged in type 1 diabetes. The breakthrough could spell the end to the grind of insulin injections. A more natural treatment should also cut the odds of developing the disabling and deadly complications of the disease, which range from heart attacks, strokes and blindness to nerve and circulatory damage and amputations. In diabetes, the body struggles to produce or use insulin, a hormone needed to convert the sugar in food into energy - so new treatments are urgently needed. The U.S. research capitalises on a technique that allows scientists to use a cocktail of vitamins, genes and other compounds to turn one type of cell into another. The researchers, from the Gladstone Institutes and the University of California, San Francisco, found the right recipe to turn human skin cells into healthy, fully-functional versions of the pancreatic beta cells that are damaged in diabetes. Grafted into a mouse, these cells worked well enough to stop the animals from developing the condition, the journal Nature Communications reports. Although insulin-producing cells have been made before, the new technique is quicker and more practical. In future, a sliver of skin could be taken from a patient’s arm and used to make trillions of healthy pancreatic beta cells. A perfect match to the patient, these customised cells could be put back into their body to replace those damaged by their diabetes. Researcher Dr Matthias Hebrok said: ‘Our results demonstrate for the first time that human adult skin cells can be used to efficiently and rapidly generate functional pa Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cells Could Regenerate And Produce Insulin Again In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Pancreatic Cells Could Regenerate And Produce Insulin Again In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, the body’s own immune system attacks cells in the pancreas, known as beta-cells, which produce the hormone insulin. Insulin is needed for moving glucose out of the blood stream and into muscles and other tissues. The condition is usually diagnosed after around 70 per cent of the beta-cells cease to function and type 1 diabetics need to inject a synthetic form of insulin to replace the missing hormone. In type 2 diabetes, too, insulin production tends to decline, with the beta-cells dying off faster than normal. Several different factors appear to be involved in this, including high blood sugar and blood fat levels, inflammatory compounds and high levels of the hormone leptin. More people with type 2 diabetes now inject insulin than those with type 1. At one time, it was thought that losing the ability to produce insulin was permanent and irreversible. But as I wrote here, scientists have discovered recently that beta-cell function can come back – in animal models of diabetes, at least. Now, a study published in the journal Nature on 20 August has shown just how remarkable this capacity for regeneration could be. The pancreas looks to be even more adaptable and to possess a greater potential for self-healing than was previously assumed. The researchers, at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, are the first to reveal a mechanism by which other cells in the pancreas called delta-cells, (which produce somatostatin, another pancreatic hormone) revert to a precursor-like cell state before being ‘reborn’ as beta-cells in diabetic mice.1 Although this only appears to happen in young mice with type 1 diabetes, it provides further evidence that loss of beta-cell function might not be the end of the story. Science is moving ahead fast in this area. Continue reading >>

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Reversing Diabetes Is Possible

Bethesda, Maryland (CNN) -- When Jonathan Legg of Bethesda, Maryland, got a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes at 39, he was shocked. "I had always been pretty active," said Legg. "But it was a big wake-up call, that what I was doing and my current weight were not OK." That was two years ago. Since that time, the Morgan Stanley executive decided to make some changes and reverse his diabetes. Although his doctor recommended he go on medication to control his illness, Legg took a different approach. Instead of meds, he began to exercise every day and changed his diet, cutting out alcohol, fatty foods and watching his carbs. Do you have diabetes? How well are you managing it? "I wanted to be able to know the changes I was making were making a difference, and it wasn't the drug," said Legg. According to new statistics just out from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.8 million people, or 8.3% of the U.S. population, are affected by either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Most, like Legg, have type 2 diabetes, which in many people develops later in life. Caused primarily by genetic makeup, a sedentary lifestyle and poor eating habits, type 2 diabetes can be reversed in some cases. By making changes to their lives such as adding exercise and improving their diets, many type 2 diabetics can drop their glucose or sugar numbers back to the normal range, reversing their condition. "We have seen numerous people reverse their condition," says Dr. Michelle Magee, director of the MedStar Diabetes Institute in Washington. "But it takes a real dedication for the rest of their lives," she notes. So why do exercise and diet help reverse diabetes? To answer that question, we first need to know why people get diabetes in the first place. Diabetes is caused when there is too much glucose Continue reading >>

Odd Trick Cheats The Pancreas To Start Producing Insulin Again

Odd Trick Cheats The Pancreas To Start Producing Insulin Again

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes, you have to take adequate steps to make sure that your body can fight against any damages that are caused by your medical condition. A lot of patients who are diagnosed with diabetes eventually learn the the trick to lower their blood pressure, reverse diabetic decay in their body and finally take back control of their lives. One of the reasons why these tricks are not so widely known is simply because your doctor won’t inform you about them, considering the fact that they themselves may not know that these methods exist. Even though doctors are thought to be experts in their medical fields, there are some facts that are not made aware to them. What you will learn here through this program is actually a very uncommon find. Even American Diabetes Association probably does not know this. Such revolutionary findings are constantly being buried by the big pharma. This situation exposes the deceitful ploys employed by the big pharmaceutical companies to earn more money. These companies grow simply because people like you and others are dependent on them and their medicines to stay ‘fit’. These companies are always trying to discredit any alternative methods of therapy and cure, simply because they do not want their customers to stop buying their expensive medicines. They will do anything to keep helpful information away from the public, so that diabetic patients cannot cure themselves. A lot of patients who have diabetes are bogged down by the financial worries that they have to deal with. The medicines usually prescribed to them by their doctors are extremely expensive, and they are only good for alleviating the effects of the symptoms without providing a cure. But when some of these patients saw this fantastic Continue reading >>

Can The Pancreas Be Repaired So It Can Start Producing Insulin?

Can The Pancreas Be Repaired So It Can Start Producing Insulin?

Answered by: Dr Anju Virmani | Consultant Endocrinologist, Sunder Lal Jain Hospital, New Delhi Q: I want to know how can improper working of pancreas be rectified and is it possible to rejuvinate it so that it can start producing required amount of insulin needed to consume blood sugar? A:The short answer to your question is No! The more detailed answer is: 1. Several drugs, primarily the sulphonylureas, stimulate the pancreas to increase production of insulin. They have been used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes for several decades. However, they work only till the pancreas is capable of being stimulated. Once the beta cells (which make insulin) are exhausted, these drugs do not work. 2. The other major strategy in treating or preventing diabetes is making the insulin produced by the body (naturally and/or in response to drugs) and/or taken by injection work more efficiently. This is done by: a. regular exercise and meal planning. b. In addition, drugs like metformin and the glitazones also help the insulin to work better. However, these drugs are useless if insulin is not being made by the body, as in type 1 diabetes. They work best in obese persons. 3. I suspect what you are more interested is the situation in type 1 diabetes (where the beta cells are destroyed) or long standing type 2 diabetes, in which the drugs begin failing. At present there is no scientifically proven method to make dead beta cells come back to life or transplant beta cells alone. So a situation where insulin production is insufficient has to be tackled by giving insulin injections. Pancreatic transplants are being done in many centers, but they need a cadaver organ donation program to be in place. Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers. Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments. The study, published in the journal Cell, says the diet reboots the body. Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease. People are advised not to try this without medical advice. In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet". It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet. It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine. Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing. Diabetes therapy? But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell. These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high. Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning." There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments. Type 1 is caused by the immune system destroying beta cells and type 2 is largely caused by lifestyle and the body no longer responding to insulin. Further t Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes And Your Pancreas

The Connection Between Diabetes And Your Pancreas

A direct connection exists between the pancreas and diabetes. The pancreas is an organ deep in your abdomen behind your stomach. It’s an important part of your digestive system. The pancreas produces enzymes and hormones that help you digest food. One of those hormones, insulin, is necessary to regulate glucose. Glucose refers to sugars in your body. Every cell in your body needs glucose for energy. Think of insulin as a lock to the cell. Insulin must open the cell to allow it to use glucose for energy. If your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or doesn’t make good use of it, glucose builds up in your bloodstream, leaving your cells starved for energy. When glucose builds up in your bloodstream, this is known as hyperglycemia. The symptoms of hyperglycemia include thirst, nausea, and shortness of breath. Low glucose, known as hypoglycemia, also causes many symptoms, including shakiness, dizziness, and loss of consciousness. Hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia can quickly become life-threatening. Each type of diabetes involves the pancreas not functioning properly. The way in which the pancreas doesn’t function properly differs depending on the type. No matter what type of diabetes you have, it requires ongoing monitoring of blood glucose levels so you can take the appropriate action. Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes the immune system erroneously attacks the beta cells that produce insulin in your pancreas. It causes permanent damage, leaving your pancreas unable to produce insulin. Exactly what triggers the immune system to do that isn’t clear. Genetic and environmental factors may play a role. You’re more likely to develop type 1 diabetes if you have a family history of the disease. About 5 percent of people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. People who ha Continue reading >>

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes rates are rising, in fact it is now considered an “epidemic” in the medical community. The American Diabetes Association reports that: 23.6 million Americans have diabetes 57 million Americans are pre-diabetic 1.6 new cases of diabetes are reported each year For those over age 60, almost 1 in 4 have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death Diabetes increases heart attack risk and 68% of diabetes related death certificates report heart related problems 75% of adults with diabetes will develop high blood pressure Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and nervous system disorders Diabetes costs $174 billion annually Diabetes is a well-established problem and a multi-billion dollar industry. It is medically characterized by Fasting Blood Glucose higher than 126 mg/dL , which ranges between 100-125 mg/dL are considered pre-diabetic and ranges below 99 mg/dL are considered normal. Studies are finding that a fasting blood glucose below 83 mg/dL is actually a better benchmark, as risk of heart disease begins to increase at anything above that. IMPORTANT: There is a difference between Type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune condition) and Type 2 diabetes (lifestyle related). This article refers specifically to Type 2 diabetes. Some medical professionals use an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) to test for diabetes. If you’ve ever been pregnant and had to drink the sickeningly sweet sugar cocktail and then have blood drawn, you are familiar with this one. Basically, a patient is given 50-75 grams of glucose in concentrated solution and his blood sugar response is measured. I’m not a fan of this test because no one should be ingesting that much concentrated glucose, and the test is not a completely accurate measure. (Just a side note: if yo Continue reading >>

Will Diabetes Go Away?

Will Diabetes Go Away?

There is no cure for diabetes. Neither type 1 (juvenile onset or insulin-requiring) diabetes or type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes ever goes away. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period" shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period" diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months to a year. The patient's insulin needs are minimal and some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin. It would be a mistake to assume that the diabetes has gone away, however. Basically, type 1 diabetes occurs when about 90 percent of the body's insulin-producing cells have been destroyed. At the time that type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most patients still are producing some insulin. If obvious symptoms of type 1 diabetes emerge when the patient has an illness, virus or cold, for example, once the illness subsides the body's insulin needs may decrease. At this point, the number of insulin-producing cells remaining may be enough — for the moment — to meet the person's insulin needs again. But the process that has destroyed 90 percent of the insulin-producing cells will ultimately destroy the remaining insulin-producing cells. And as that destruction continues, the amount of injected insulin the patient needs will increase — and ultimately the patient will be totally dependent on insulin injections. Scientists now think that it is important for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to continue taking some insulin by injection even during the honeymoon period. Why? Because they have some scientific evidence to suggest that doing so will help preserve the few remaining insulin-producing cells for a while longer. Patients diagnosed wi Continue reading >>

How To Increase Insulin Production In Body Naturally ?

How To Increase Insulin Production In Body Naturally ?

If you are a type 1 / type-2 diabetic whose morning starts with where shall I inject insulin today and you are one amongst many type 1 /type-2 diabetics who struggles to manage insulin levels and are frustrated of the costs and the pain of injecting insulin everyday then you must know there are methods to produce insulin in your body naturally by making great food choices, exercise regularly and taking right vitamin supplements, Lets explore !! Even if you can reduce one shot of insulin it feels great ,,, Insulin is a hormone that is mainly responsible for glucose regulation. It is produced by the beta cells of pancreas, an organ that is located in the abdomen. Insulin allows the glucose uptake by body cells so that it can be utilized as fuel by the body tissues.Our body needs an optimum level of insulin to maintain the normal glucose balance. Either reduction or an increase in insulin will have deleterious effects on body. In cases where insulin starts falling, the body fails to consume sugar as body fuel. Hence, it is crucial to have a recommended insulin level for healthy body functions. A decrease in insulin results in type 1 diabetes. Eating Right Food can Boost Insulin Production Diet is the main factor that has a major effect on pancreas and insulin levels. Whatever we eat, directly affects the insulin secretion, production and health of pancreas. Pancreas is an important organ that performs both functions of insulin production and foods’ digestion. If someone keeps on taking ‘anti-pancreas’ foods, it will badly hurt the functioning of pancreas. In addition to insulin friendly foods, it is also wise to decrease the use of insulin decreasing diets. Following text explains the simple, natural and effective ways to boost insulin production by activating pancre Continue reading >>

Breaking News – Your Pancreas Can Regenerate Itself!

Breaking News – Your Pancreas Can Regenerate Itself!

Diabetes is beatable. But don’t wait around for doctors to tell you how. The bottom line is that current medical treatments for diabetes do not reverse or control the disease. To do that, you have to approach it naturally. In diabetes, it’s the beta cells of the pancreas that are in low numbers. The beta cells are important because they make insulin. Degeneration of the beta cells is the main cause of type I diabetes. Exclusive Bonus: Download the 3-point checklist which shows you EXACTLY how to regenerate your beta cells naturally using this scientifically-proven method. Over 2000 medical studies have reported on the topic of pancreas regeneration. Yet you probably haven’t heard about them on television or radio. This may be for several reasons. But the main reason could be that pancreas regeneration is most effectively achieved by herbs, not medical procedures. Much stem cell research has focused on the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to diabetic animals to see what happens. These studies all show the same thing: a significant reduction in blood glucose level, plus regeneration of the pancreas cells. The regeneration is determined by seeing an increase in the total number of islet cells and insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. That’s all well and good. But finding donors of pancreas cells is still quite difficult. Everyone needs their pancreas for their own health and no one wants to donate it. Embryonic stem cells, a potential source of new pancreatic cells, are big in the news right now with the latest Planned Parenthood scam of selling aborted baby parts for research. So their source is quite ethically questionable. Delta-cells in the Pancreas Researchers at the University of Geneva in Switzerland revealed a mechanism by which other cells in t Continue reading >>

Can Beta Cells Be Healed?

Can Beta Cells Be Healed?

Can Type 2 or Type 1 diabetes be not only reversed, but cured? Can beta cells start producing enough insulin? Can the liver store glucose better, and can body cells learn to handle glucose more efficiently? We always hear that diabetes is incurable, and so far it has been. But people are trying. Diabetes affects so many organs; we’ll have to investigate them one at a time. This week we’ll look at beta cells in the pancreas. If you have Type 1 or 2 diabetes or prediabetes, you have damaged beta cells. So you don’t have enough insulin, and what you have may not be released when it’s needed. If the cells were healed, diabetes would pretty much go away. But is this possible, and how could it be done? In Type 1 diabetes, cells from the immune system attack and destroy beta cells. Type 1.5 diabetes or LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes of adults) probably involves a similar process. So restoring beta cells in Type 1 or 1.5 will probably require changing the immune system. Reducing the need for insulin by eating a healthy diet helps, but I don’t know of any Type 1s or people with LADA who recovered normal beta cell function by diet alone. Many are looking at surgically replacing beta cells. Hundreds of experimental “islet cell transplants” have been done. But the results aren’t great. This approach will only work if we could also “turn off” whatever process is killing beta cells in the first place. But there’s a lot of money in it, so I’m sure the research will continue. Research is going on into drugs that might stop the immune system’s attack. A drug called teplizumab is being studied and shows promise. But as a person with an immune disease of my own, I’m pretty sure this progress will be slow. The immune system is not well understood yet. Beta cel Continue reading >>

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