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Can Perimenopause Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Diabetes And Menopause: A Twin Challenge

Diabetes And Menopause: A Twin Challenge

Diabetes and menopause may team up for varied effects on your body. Here's what to expect — and how to stay in control. Menopause — and the years leading up to it — may present unique challenges if you have diabetes. But it's not necessarily a one-two punch. First, learn what to expect. Then consider what to do about it. Diabetes and menopause: What to expect Menopause is the phase of life after your periods have stopped and your estrogen levels decline. In some women, menopause can occur as a result of surgery, when the ovaries are removed for other medical reasons. Diabetes and menopause may team up for varied effects on your body, including: Changes in blood sugar level. The hormones estrogen and progesterone affect how your cells respond to insulin. After menopause, changes in your hormone levels can trigger fluctuations in your blood sugar level. You may notice that your blood sugar level is more variable and less predictable than before. If your blood sugar gets out of control, you have a higher risk of diabetes complications. Weight gain. Some women gain weight during the menopausal transition and after menopause. This can increase the need for insulin or oral diabetes medication. Infections. Even before menopause, high blood sugar levels can contribute to urinary tract and vaginal infections. After menopause — when a drop in estrogen makes it easier for bacteria and yeast to thrive in the urinary tract and vagina — the risk is even higher. Sleep problems. After menopause, hot flashes and night sweats may keep you up at night. In turn, the sleep deprivation can make it tougher to manage your blood sugar level. Sexual problems. Diabetes can damage the nerves of the cells that line the vagina. This can interfere with arousal and orgasm. Vaginal dryness, a Continue reading >>

How Menopause Affects Your Blood Sugar Levels

How Menopause Affects Your Blood Sugar Levels

Read the full video transcript below Today's topic Hello, and welcome to my weekly video blog. And today on A.Vogel Talks Menopause, I'm going to be discussing your blood sugar levels. Now, for those of you, especially, that have been watching for a while, you'll know that I often talk about controlling blood sugar levels and how important it is in the menopause. So I'm going to look at this in a little bit more detail. What is blood sugar control? Well, your brain needs glucose as a fuel, so levels must stay constant in the blood all the time. And sometimes your blood sugar levels get a bit low. Now, if you imagine you're going on a car journey and you're starting to run out of petrol, you'll get a little warning bleep, you might get a little light flashing on the dashboard. If you ignore that and the car goes on for a bit longer, you'll get a bigger bleep and you'll get more flashes until eventually the bleep is absolutely continuous. And at that point, you go, "Oh, I better do something about this now or we're going to run out of petrol." And it's the same with our blood glucose levels. If it starts to get too low, the body has then got to give you some kind of warning signal that it's time to eat something. What happens when it gets low Now, when it gets too low, that could be to do with the fact that you're not eating enough. And, you know, especially at this time of the year, how many of us think about going on diets for the summer? It can be that we're missing meals, it could be that we're eating the wrong foods, or it could be the fact that we're waiting too long between meals before we're actually eating. So the body has to give us some kind of reminder to eat something. Normally, it can just be hunger pangs, and very often that's something we will then address Continue reading >>

Menopause

Menopause

What to Expect, How to Cope For most women, menopause—the cessation of menstrual periods—is a normal, natural occurrence. The average age at menopause is 51, although any time after 40 is considered normal. The years leading up to the menopausal transition—a time known as the perimenopause—may be characterized by changes in the menstrual period, hot flashes (a sudden feeling of warmth, sometimes accompanied by sweating), emotional ups and downs, sleep disturbances, and vaginal dryness. Some of these symptoms may continue after menopause. The severity of symptoms varies dramatically from person to person, ranging from barely noticeable menstrual changes to an experience described as debilitating. Women who experience menopause abruptly because of the surgical removal of their ovaries (called surgical menopause) typically have much more severe symptoms than women who experience a natural menopause. Both the perimenopausal and postmenopausal periods may present additional challenges for women who have diabetes. For one thing, the hormonal fluctuations that are common to perimenopause can affect blood glucose levels. For another, some symptoms of menopause are the same as or easily confused with the symptoms of high or low blood glucose levels, so the cause must be determined before corrective action can be taken. In addition, both diabetes and menopause raise a woman’s risk of osteoporosis, so women with diabetes must be proactive about taking steps to keep their bones strong. Lack of sleep, whether related to menopause, stress, or something else, can disrupt diabetes control. And menopause is often associated with weight gain, which can make blood glucose control more difficult. The menopausal process A woman is said to be postmenopausal one year after her final Continue reading >>

Menopause

Menopause

Menopause marks the completion of a natural process that women go through as the child-bearing years come to an end and the ovaries cease to release eggs every month. The hormones estrogen and progesterone, which prepare the uterus for pregnancy, decrease considerably, although small amounts of estrogen may still be produced. Prior to menopause, the hormonal changes that a woman experiences during her monthly cycles often follow her own individual pattern: One woman will have a period every 26 days which may last four to five days while another woman's may occur every 31 days and last six to seven days. This pattern often changes dramatically as a woman approaches menopause. Some women begin to experience hormonal fluctuations in their mid-to-late thirties but the majority of women notice changes starting in their early forties. Menopause takes place when you have not menstruated for 12 months. For most women in North America, this occurs around 51 years of age. Women with type 1 diabetes may experience menopause earlier than average. Women with type 2 diabetes may reach menopause later than average if they are above a healthy weight, as estrogen levels do not decrease as rapidly in women who are overweight. During peri-menopause, the years leading up to menopause, surges and reductions in estrogen and progesterone can affect women in various ways: Mood changes, increased PMS signs, menstrual periods that are more or less frequent, heavier or lighter blood flow during menstruation. These hormonal changes can affect women with diabetes by causing blood glucose to fluctuate. For some women this is scarcely noticeable as estrogen and progesterone production is reduced gradually over the years. However, for many women, fluctuations in blood glucose can mean that they need t Continue reading >>

Don’t Sugar Coat It…diabetes Effects Menopause Symptoms

Don’t Sugar Coat It…diabetes Effects Menopause Symptoms

The Effects of Menopause and Diabetes Hormonal changes The menopause, and the years leading up to it, is when women’s bodies gradually produce less estrogen and progesterone. These hormonal changes can affect blood sugar levels differently for each individual. Many women notice their blood sugar levels fluctuate more,. The hormonal changes as well as swings in blood sugar levels can contribute to mood changes, fatigue and hot flushes. Weight gain often occurs at menopause. Any weight gain will increase insulin resistance which may cause the development of diabetes. And, in women who have diabetes, menopause itself, can wreak havoc on their diabetes control and they may have to adjust their diabetes medication. Menopause means end of menstruation. It is defined as not having a menstrual period for 12 consecutive months in a row. The menopause may be natural or it may occur after a hysterectomy, the surgical removal of the uterus, with the removal of the ovaries (oophorectomy). The usual age for women to stop menstruating naturally is between 45 -55 years. Signs and Symptoms of Menopause include: Mood changes Disturbed sleep Depression and headaches Irregular periods Hot flashes Night sweats Other symptoms includes: vaginal dryness, loss of sex drive and bladder problems. These problems will be made worse by high blood sugar levels. Does Menopause Increase Diabetes? This question is difficult to answer, but it does look like estrogen and progesterone may have something to do with it. Also, of course, our age, weight and lifestyle plays an important part. As women start to go into menopause, changes in hormone levels can lead to swings in blood glucose levels. That is why it is so important for women to have their blood sugar checked regularly. It’s important for women Continue reading >>

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes cases in the developing world and it is still increasing in an alarm rate. In 2016, it is estimated that 1 in 10 US individuals have type 2 diabetes (the increase rate of type 1 diabetes is much smaller). By 2050, it is estimated that 1 in 3 individuals will suffer from type 2 diabetes. From the statistics, overweight individuals who are age 40 or older are in the highest risk percentile. How does this information important for women? In the United States, diabetes is ranked as the number 6 most common cause of death for females between 45 to 54 years old and the number 4 common cause of death for females who are between 55 to 64 years old. It seems that as women grow older and reach their menopause stage, they become much more susceptible to develop diabetes. The question is whether menopause can drastically increase the risk of developing diabetes? This article will answer this question along with covering various topics that concerns menopause and its effect on diabetes: Can Menopause Can Trigger Diabetes? We would like to give you a straightforward answer for this question. However, sadly, health research scientists are still struggling to find the answer because it is difficult to separate the correlation and effects of menopause from the correlation and effects of age and weight. In 2011, a scientific correlation study suggests that after taking the age factor out from the correlation study, there is “no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk” (Kim, 2011). Yet there have been studies suggesting that progesterone is correlated with the development diabetes. Although we cannot give you a straight yes or Continue reading >>

Menopause And Diabetes

Menopause And Diabetes

Tweet Managing diabetes whilst going through menopause can feel like a twin challenge for most women due to the combined effects that each condition can have on the body. The best way to remain in control is by knowing what to expect so that you can prepare yourself for the unique challenges that may lie ahead. What is menopause? Menopause is the general term that describes the end of a woman's menstrual cycle - in other words, the cessation of monthly periods - that usually occurs around the age of 50. Periods usually come to a gradual halt, becoming less frequent and with longer intervals between each one before stopping altogether. But for some women, the end of menstruation can be sudden. It is this period that is referred to when a woman is said to be 'going through menopause'. For many women, the end of menstruation can lead to a number of physical and emotional symptoms, which can be detrimental to health. Levels of the female sex hormone oestrogen decrease, causing the ovaries to stop producing an egg each month (ovulation). Reduced oestrogen can result in women experiencing hot flushes, night sweats, mood swings and vaginal dryness. However, changing hormone levels can also trigger spikes and falls in blood sugar levels, which for women with diabetes can lead to a number of problems and may pose a number of health risks. I have both diabetes and menopause - what should I expect? Menopause will not affect every woman in the same way, however, there are a number of common effects. Fluctuating blood sugar levels As mentioned above, changes in the levels of oestrogen and progesterone - hormones that affect how your cells respond to insulin - can lead to unexpected fluctuations in your blood sugars, making it harder to keep diabetes well controlled. Weight gain Putt Continue reading >>

Does The Menopause Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Does The Menopause Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does the menopause affect blood sugar levels? I''m not sure about the real menopause and will let someone more knowledgable answer on that one but had a chemically-induced once for 6 months and found my sugars ran a little higher than normal. However, I spoke to someone else in the same situation who had nothing but hypos! I find any change in your hormones can affect your blood sugar levels so, if you're taking HRT, that may affect your sugars too. If you're trying different ones, note these in your blood sugar diary so you can track any trends. HI, not sure if this helps? I was actually diagnosed diabetic type2 during my menopause and was told it was a contributory factor n was midlife onset diabetes. And I thought my thyroid had 'bombed again' which it had ! plus a Hba1c of 9.7... So it was shock to hear n discover this... then gp went up on the thyroxine meds plus reveiw on my menopause n meds plus new start n life changing journey with diabetes. Have noticed if am having hot flushes n feel drained YES my BS shoot skywards.... mite be hormones??? Any help? Anna. Any change in hormone levels the blood glucose responds to some degree.. It happen's every day with any diabetic with our normal daily hormonal cycle, Some hardly have an impact while others it does.. Dawn P is your blood glucose levels reacting to the increase in hormone levels that get us up and going during the day.. We test around 3am overnight because this is the time on adverage that a personal hormone activity is at it's lowest ebb.. Many females of child bearing age, we see their bg/control shift as they go through the monthy cycle into their periods.. Teenagers react to their chan Continue reading >>

What Every Woman Should Know About Menopause And Diabetes

What Every Woman Should Know About Menopause And Diabetes

When people say you're sweet, it's usually meant as a compliment. But when your blood is too sweet or your blood sugar (glucose) is too high, it's a warning sign for prediabetes or diabetes. And unless you act quickly, your body won't like it. According to the American Diabetes Association, in 2012, 29.1 million Americans had diabetes, and more than half were women. And of the more than 29 million with diabetes, 21 million were undiagnosed. It's not surprising that many women in perimenopause and menopause don't realize they have diabetes — the symptoms can be confused with symptoms of menopause. Frequent urination, night sweats, anxiety, mood swings, foggy thinking, dry itchy skin, and vaginal infections are common to both. It's important to know if you have prediabetes or diabetes because diabetes is one of the most silently dangerous diseases we face. It's the No. 6 killer of women ages 45 to 54 and the No. 4 killer of women ages 55 to 65. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 1 in 10 U.S. adults has diabetes now, and if current trends continue, that figure could rise to 1 in 3 by 2050. Why is diabetes so dangerous? Chronically high blood sugars silently damage blood vessels and nerves, and that can lead to: Heart disease Stroke Nerve damage (neuropathy) that leads to tingling and pain in feet and hands Kidney disease Loss of vision Feet infections and in some severe cases, amputation Bone and joint problems Skin infections and wounds that don't heal Teeth and gum infections There are two kinds of diabetes. Type 1 (sometimes called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes) occurs when the beta cells of your pancreas produce too little or no insulin. It usually occurs in children or young adults. Type 2 (often called adult-onset, but can Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Menopause – What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Menopause – What You Need To Know

Women with diabetes may at first have a hard time telling the difference between a bout of low blood sugar and menopause. If you are a woman with diabetes approaching a certain age, there may come a point when it can feel as though you hit a wall with your diabetes self-care. Your blood sugar levels may become erratic, you might find you’ve gained a bit of weight, and you sleep restlessly. What you may be experiencing is menopause. Menopause typically starts around age 50, but perimenopause, the beginning stages of menopause, can start as early as 40. At this time, the hormones estrogen and progesterone start fluctuating, causing hot flashes, moodiness, short-term memory loss, and fatigue. For a woman with diabetes, fluctuating blood sugars can also be common with menopause. The tricky thing is that the symptoms of menopause are so similar to low blood sugar that it can be hard to distinguish between the two. More frequent blood sugar monitoring is essential to identify whether the symptoms you experience are caused by diabetes, menopause, or a combination of both. Weight gain, although not inevitable, is common during menopause for women with and without diabetes. You also are prone to lose muscle mass and replace it with fat, usually in the abdomen, hips, and thighs. Without any changes in diet, you may find the scale creeping up. Diabetes and menopause share several other symptoms, including vaginal dryness, vaginal infections and urinary tract infections. These are caused by reduced estrogen levels in menopause, and elevated glucose levels and nerve damage with diabetes. Treating the symptoms of vaginal dryness is important for comfort and avoiding vaginal infection. There are ways to make yourself feel better during menopause, and regain stability with your blood Continue reading >>

Perimenopause? - Diabetes Self-management

Perimenopause? - Diabetes Self-management

Its hard for me to wrap my head around the fact that Im middle aged. Somehow, I still think of myself as, I dont know, maybe 27? Forty-six years old seems so mature, and I dont feel very mature. I feel unsure about things (work, money, kids, etc.), but I cant ignore the obvious reminders that I am in middle age. One of those reminders is the fact that my oldest son is about to turn 16 and will be driving soon. That freaks me out for a number of reasons. Mostly because when I was 16, I was a terrible driver. Other obvious reminders are the physical changes to my body. The wrinkles and sun spots (ugh!), but also the recent hot flashes . I live in the south, where temperatures run in the 90s from July through early October, so sweating is the norm. People here learn to live with the heat just like people in the north learn to live with the freezing cold. After months of waking up in the middle of the night with sweat-soaked pajamas (and blaming it on our comforter, even though my husband doesnt wake up sweaty), I gave in and bought a small fan that blows on my face all night. That should fix it! I told myself, ignoring the voice in my head saying: Are these night sweats? Am I having hot flashes? Is this perimenopause? In my book The Smart Womans Guide to Diabetes: Authentic Advice on Everything From Eating to Dating and Motherhood, I concluded with a chapter on Aging Gracefully. When I wrote the book, I was 39 years old, and aging gracefully seemed really far away. It feels ironic, and a little bit scary, to reference this chapter now. In Aging Gracefully I cited Menopause: What to Expect and How to Cope, by Pat Dougherty, CNM, MSN, and Joyce Green Pastors, MS, RD, CDE, who write that menopause can be especially challenging for women with diabetes. Both the perimenopausal Continue reading >>

Sugar Sensitivity & Menopause

Sugar Sensitivity & Menopause

Menopause, a time of hormonal upheaval for many women, may include a range of symptoms and health effects aside from hot flashes, night sweats and mood swings. Hormonal ups and downs during menopause can affect your blood sugar levels and may be a contributing factor to your hot flashes and irritability and other menopausal complaints. Blood sugar imbalances can also make you more susceptible to developing certain health conditions. Video of the Day The effects of menopause on sugar sensitivity have not been well studied and have produced contradictory results, according to Rogerio A. Lobo, editor of the book "Menopause: Biology and Pathobiology." Insulin levels have been seen to decrease in some studies, increase in others and stay the same in yet others. Some experts believe that insulin secretion and elimination both decrease after menopause, resulting in no effect on glucose tolerance or insulin levels. Insulin secretion has been shown to be the same in women on hormone replacement as for those not undergoing hormone replacement therapy. However, diabetic menopausal women manage blood sugar better on estrogen replacement. Estrogen contributes to insulin sensitivity by encouraging muscle cells to absorb glucose. Declining estrogen levels during menopause make you more susceptible to insulin resistance, according to naturopath Joseph Collins, author of the book "Discover Your Menopause Type." Your risk for developing diseases related to insulin resistance, such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer, also increase. Insulin resistance occurs in up to 44 percent of healthy postmenopausal women and is not always associated with obesity. Metabolic stress caused by excessive oxidation and inflammation are associated with increased risk for d Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar During Peri & Menopause ..

High Blood Sugar During Peri & Menopause ..

Did you know that if you are going through menopause it could be impacting blood sugar levels? This happened to me three years ago during peri menopause, after a fasting blood sugar bllod test, told borderline type 2 diabetes, so, I have to monitor regularly, no family history of diabetes, and not over weight... all in order now, it was peri causing it... but I was not aware until the blood test. Yes, it's true! Your female hormones, estrogens and progesterone affect your cells' sensitivity to insulin. So if you thought as your menopausal symptoms have gotten worse your blood sugar levels have also become less predictable, you are not crazy, it is true. Why does one of your health conditions affect another? It is happening because our hormones impact There are three different estrogens which are produced mainly in the ovaries each month that we have our menstrual cycle. As we move into menopause the levels of estrogen being produced in the ovaries begin to decline. Once in the blood stream, insulin travels to cells to help remove glucose from the blood so it can enter all of our cells easily. Estrogen has a protective effect on pancreas cells and prevents them from premature cell death. It also works on the cells of the pancreas to increase the production of insulin when required by certain conditions, such as diabetes. The decline in estrogen seems to cause our cells to become more insulin resistant, exacerbating blood glucose levels circulating in the body. Insulin resistance causes cells to not absorb glucose from the bloodstream as readily so blood glucose levels get higher. This causes a higher probability of exacerbating high blood sugars and diabetic complications over time. So what is the solution to this seemingly-complicated situation where menopause and diabe Continue reading >>

How Menopause Affects Type 2 Diabetes

How Menopause Affects Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to menopause, there are women who welcome it and women who dread it. There’s also a lot of discussion about whether this transition is something that should be “treated” or left to occur naturally without the use of medication. But for some women, particularly those with type 2 diabetes, menopause is an even more complicated topic. Not only does it signal the end of childbearing years — it can lead to other physical changes, too. Why Menopause Is Different With Diabetes If you usually ovulate every 28 days or so, your cycle may begin to vary as you approach menopause. You may go 40 days or longer between periods or at other times find that your periods come only a couple of weeks apart. As this is happening, the levels of your estrogen and progesterone hormones are changing as well. These hormonal fluctuations can affect your blood glucose levels, which can cause problems for women with type 2 diabetes. To avoid complications from type 2 diabetes, it’s essential to keep your blood glucose levels as even as possible — something that can be tricky during menopause. Recognizing Menopause Symptoms Some symptoms of menopause can be confused with signs of too high or too low blood glucose, including dizziness, sweating, and irritability. With symptoms being so similar, it may be hard to tell which is which. Rather than guessing, you should check your blood glucose levels when you’re experiencing these effects. If the symptoms persist or get more uncomfortable, try talking to your doctor about treatment options. Researchers have found that estrogen levels in women who are overweight, regardless of whether they have diabetes, drop more slowly than in those who are underweight or of normal weight. “If you are overweight, your cells take anything mad Continue reading >>

Menopause And Blood Sugar: Is There Any Connection?

Menopause And Blood Sugar: Is There Any Connection?

Menopause and Blood Sugar Menopause is the time of life when a woman’s menstrual cycle comes to an end, and as a result, she experiences various symptoms linked to this. Because her female reproductive hormones, namely progesterone and estrogen, significantly decrease*, a number of changes occur in her body. These changes can also affect the amount and control of blood sugar in her body. Although there has not been extensive research linking menopause and the levels of blood sugar, doctors believe that there is a link between the two. Just like each woman experiences different menopause symptoms at varying levels, so blood sugar levels during menopause vary significantly. Some women experience lower levels, while others experience much higher levels. With some women, however, the blood sugar levels do not change during menopause. Symptom of Blood Sugar The symptoms of low and high blood sugar vary. If a woman has high blood sugar, then her body does not have enough insulin to regulate the amount of blood sugar in her body. She is likely to experience nausea, blurred vision, extreme thirst, extreme hunger, drowsiness and the need to urinate frequently. If a woman has low blood sugar, then the opposite is true – she has too much insulin for the blood sugar in her body. The symptoms she may experience include sweating, weakness, extreme hunger, tiredness, anxiety, fast heartbeat, dizziness and irritability. What Causes Height Blood Sugar at Menopause? During menopause, estrogen and progesterone levels decrease* significantly, affecting a number of regular bodily functions. One of the effects that these lower hormonal levels have on the body’s cells is that they change the way cells respond to insulin. In most women, this will result in higher levels of blood sugar. I Continue reading >>

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