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Can Insulin Resistance Be Reversed Completely

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is the underlying condition that is present in all forms of diabetes. Most people believe that insulin resistance is only present in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, however ample research shows that insulin resistance is also present in type 1 diabetes (1-3). It is a common misconception that people with type 1 diabetes do not experience insulin resistance. Even many doctors believe that insulin resistance only affects people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and that by nature of being “skinny” or “normoweight,” people with type 1 diabetes are insulin sensitive. This information cannot be farther from the truth. In my practice, more than 95% of my clients with type 1 diabetes are insulin resistant, and 100% of my clients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant. If you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, you probably have picked up on the fact that I’m a huge fan of maximizing insulin effectiveness over managing blood glucose. The reason for this is actually quite simple: Trying to control blood glucose without addressing insulin resistance is akin to frequently washing your car and never fixing problems under the hood. Addressing the root cause of blood glucose variability – insulin resistance – is the most successful method of controlling blood glucose. Period. The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster Perhaps you’ve been in this situation before: you wake up in the morning, your blood glucose is 50 points over the normal range. You don’t know why. You eat a standard breakfast, bolus the same amount of insulin that you always give yourself for breakfast, and then continue on with your day. Two hours later, when you check your blood glucose, and it is still high. This time it is 150 points above the norma Continue reading >>

Are Diabetes And Insulin Resistance Reversible? The Facts.

Are Diabetes And Insulin Resistance Reversible? The Facts.

THE MEDICAL PROFESSION WOULD have you believe that diabetes is not reversible and only controlling your blood sugar with drugs or insulin will protect you from organ damage and death. But medication and insulin can actually increase your risk of getting a heart attack or dying. The diabetes epidemic is accelerating along with the obesity epidemic, and what you are not hearing about is another way to treat it. Type 2 diabetes, or what was once called adult onset diabetes, is increasing worldwide and now affects nearly 100 million people — and over 20 million Americans. We are seeing increasing rates of Type 2 diabetes, especially in children, which has increased over 1,000 percent in the last decade and was unknown before this generation. One in three children born today will have diabetes in their lifetime. Yet this is an entirely preventable lifestyle disease. In a report in The New England Journal of Medicine, Walter Willett, MD, PhD, and his colleagues from the Harvard School of Public Health demonstrated that 91 percent of all Type 2 diabetes cases could be prevented through improvements lifestyle and diet. Here, I want to review in detail this new way of thinking about diabetes and outline the tests I recommend to identify problems with blood sugar. Next I’ll tell you exactly how to prevent, treat, and reverse Type 2 diabetes. The Road to Diabetes Starts Early Diabetes is often undiagnosed until its later stages. Insulin resistance, when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin, is primarily what causes diabetes. When your diet is full of empty calories, an abundance of quickly absorbed sugars and carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, etc.), the body slowly becomes resistant to the effects of insulin and needs more to do the same job of keepi Continue reading >>

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. The pancreas contains clusters of cells called islets. Beta cells within the islets make insulin and release it into the blood. Insulin plays a major role in metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for energy. The digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates—sugars and starches found in many foods—into glucose. Glucose is a form of sugar that enters the bloodstream. With the help of insulin, cells throughout the body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin into the blood. Insulin and glucose then travel in the blood to cells throughout the body. Insulin helps muscle, fat, and liver cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream, lowering blood glucose levels. Insulin stimulates the liver and muscle tissue to store excess glucose. The stored form of glucose is called glycogen. Insulin also lowers blood glucose levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. In a healthy person, these functions allow blood glucose and insulin levels to remain in the normal range. What happens with insulin resistance? In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin and thus cannot easily absorb glucose from the bloodstream. As a result, the body needs higher levels of insulin to help glucose enter cells. The beta cells in the pancreas try to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. As long as the beta cells are able to produce enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance, blood glucose levels stay in the healthy range. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes and prediabetes because the bet Continue reading >>

How John Reversed Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance In Just 3 Days

How John Reversed Symptoms Of Insulin Resistance In Just 3 Days

How John Reversed Symptoms of Insulin Resistance in Just 3 Days Fifteen years ago, John Havay was called into his boss office and told that his blood glucose at his most recent doctors appointment was over 700 mg/dL, and was promptly rushed to the hospital. At the hospital, John was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Like many people in his shoes, John was prescribed both Glipizide and Metformin to help manage these symptoms of insulin resistance, and was not given thorough information on how to change his diet. As tends to happen, John increased his dosage of medication over time, and about 7 years ago, he began adding basal insulin (Lantus) as well as Victoza to his daily regimen. Despite taking both oral medication and insulin, the symptoms of insulin resistance did not abate. Johns blood glucose averaged around 200 mg/dL and he his A1c hovered at 13.8%. Despite taking both oral medication and insulin, the symptoms of insulin resistance did not abate. Johns blood glucose averaged around 200 mg/dL and he his A1c hovered at 13.8%. The Turning Point: Dr. Ronald Weiss and Ethos Health Johns sister had heard of Dr. Ronald Weiss a primary care physician in New Jersey who uses plant-based nutrition as the first line of medical care and suggested that John set up a consultation to learn more about how he could use food as medicine to not only manage but reverse type 2 diabetes (and the corresponding symptoms of insulin resistance) altogether. Although John was skeptical, peripheral neuropathy had become incredibly painful, and he decided that he was willing to try anything that could possibly help improve his overall health. He called Ethos Health and set up an appointment with Dr. Weiss. Dr. Weiss taught John about the true cause of type 2 diabetes (insulin resistance), and h Continue reading >>

I Reversed Insulin Resistance And You Can Too

I Reversed Insulin Resistance And You Can Too

It was 2014 and I was looking at a lot of red in my most recent blood work results. What’s all this red?” I asked my Doctor. “Well,” she said, “It shows your cholesterol is on the higher side and you have some insulin resistance.” I know high cholesterol was bad, but “what is insulin resistance, exactly?” I wasn’t quite sure. I’m pretty up on all the latest health information. I’m an athlete, I eat whatever I want, but I burn it all off, don’t I? That’s what I thought, anyway. Turns out that’s not the case. Insulin Resistance is also referred to as Pre-Diabetes! What?!! Thankfully my doctor told me I hadn’t progressed to the point of no return and with a few lifestyle changes we could reverse the trend. I took a much deeper dive into my blood work and more importantly, my diet. As an endurance athlete, I’ve participated in marathons, triathlons, the famed Leadville 100 mountain bike race, multi-day Adventure Races, and more. I always watched what I eat, I don’t drink alcohol, but used to enjoy my chips and dessert. For many years, I bought into the “carbohydrates are your fuel” motto for years and years. My first marathon was in 2000. I planned my intake like a scientist. I knew when I was supposed to take my gels, eat my bars, and drink my drinks. That first race led to my first triathlon, then to my first Adventure Race. And for the first 5-6 years of that decade I was literally off to the races. I loved it. I would train for hours each day, sometimes I’d go out for a 6 hour bike ride, then a 2 hour run, and maybe even mix in a 3 hour paddle on the ocean. It was so much fun, it unlocked the kid in me. What I didn’t realize, however, is that I was over stimulating my pancreas. It wasn’t until years later, 2014 to be exact, th Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance In 4 Easy Steps

Reverse Insulin Resistance In 4 Easy Steps

Reverse Insulin Resistance in 4 Easy Steps When it comes to metabolism and weight loss, it’s mostly about insulin. Insulin is also a major factor in many women’s health conditions such as  PCOS , acne , progesterone deficiency , and heavy periods . Healthy insulin sensitivity is how you keep inflammation down. It’s how you reduce your long-term risk of diabetes, cancer, osteoporosis , dementia, and heart disease. Do you have insulin resistance? It’s time to find out. Under normal conditions, your hormone insulin rises briefly after eating. It stimulates your liver and muscles to take up sugar from your blood and convert it to energy. This causes your blood sugar to fall, and then your insulin to fall. When you are insulin sensitive, both your sugar and insulin are low on a fasting blood test. When you have insulin resistance, your blood sugar may be normal but your insulin will be high. Why? Because your liver and muscles are not responding properly to insulin, so your pancreas makes more. Too much insulin then generates inflammation and pushes calories into fat storage. Too much insulin also impairs ovulation  and stimulates your ovaries to make testosterone, which is a major cause of PCOS . Insulin resistance is common and affects at least one in four adults. It is also called pre-diabetes or metabolic syndrome. Blood test: The way to diagnose insulin resistance is to test insulin–not blood sugar. Ask your doctor to order “fasting insulin” or a “glucose tolerance test with insulin.” Look at your insulin reading (not just your blood sugar reading). Your fasting insulin should be less than 55 pmol/L (8 mIU/L ). One hour after the sugar challenge, your insulin should be less than 270 pmol/L (45 mIU/L). You can also use a blood test called Continue reading >>

A Few Simple Changes Can Help Reverse Insulin Resistance Naturally

A Few Simple Changes Can Help Reverse Insulin Resistance Naturally

Reset Scientists have known that calorie restriction, when accompanied by optimum nutrition (also known as C.R.O.N.) can extend lifespan of animals 30 to 230 %, depending on the species. Primate studies are in process. It will be another 10 years before we known the final results, and no doubt, results will then lead to even more questions. What we do know, from major studies of centenarians already underway, is that the demographics have nothing much in common. Many centenarians are smokers, for example. They come from all over the world without favoring any geographic location in particular. However, there are 3 consistent blood metabolic indicators of all centenarians that are relatively consistent: low sugar, low triglyceride, and low insulin. All three are relatively low for age. Among these three variables insulin is the common denominator. The level of insulin sensitivity of the cell is one of the most important markers of lifespan. Many lifestyle factors can contribute to a resistance to insulin, so in this article, we will go into what exactly this means, what it affects, and how to reverse insulin resistance naturally. Insulin When we eat, the food we consume turns into sugar once inside the body. This is particularly true of carbohydrates such as potatoes or rice. This sugar circulates within us, and under the influence of insulin, is absorbed into the surrounding cells and tissue where it is metabolized into energy, or in the case of excessive sugar, stored for future use. Insulin is commonly known as a hormone secreted by the beta cells of the pancreas that lowers the blood sugar by promoting their transport from the blood stream to the cell. Cells, in turn, use sugar as fuel to generate ATP, the energy currency of the body. Insulin’s real purpose in our Continue reading >>

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

5 Steps To Reversing Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin Resistance

Breaking news! Some newly discovered compounds have just been found to turn off all of the genes that cause diabetes. Are these compounds found in a pill bottle? No! Instead, you’ll find them on your dinner plate — in rye bread and pasta. (As I recently wrote in one of my blogs, rye contains special phytonutrients that turn off all the genes responsible for diabetes — in just a few weeks.) Last week, I explained how to find out if you are pre-diabetic or diabetic. Half of the 24 million people with diabetes don’t know they have it and nearly all the 60 million people with pre-diabetes don’t know they have it. Today, I want to share with you more information about what you can do NOW to prevent and reverse diabetes and pre-diabetes. And rye bread isn’t the only answer — I’ve got a lot more good advice, too. But first I want to emphasize new research that should be headlines news but never saw the light of day. Do our current drugs treatments for diabetes actually work to prevent heart attacks and death? Surely lowering blood sugar in diabetics is an effective strategy for reducing the risk of death and heart disease. It would seem obvious that if diabetes is a disease of high blood sugar, then reducing blood sugar would be beneficial. However elevated sugar is only a symptom, not the cause of the problem. The real problem is elevated insulin unchecked over decades from a highly refined carbohydrate diet, a sedentary lifestyle and environmental toxins. Most medications and insulin therapy are aimed at lowering blood sugar through increasing insulin. In the randomized ACCORD trial of over 10,000 patients, this turns out to be a bad idea. In the intensive glucose-lowering group, there were no fewer heart attacks, and more patients died. Yet we continue to pa Continue reading >>

What It Feels Like To Regain Your Insulin Sensitivity

What It Feels Like To Regain Your Insulin Sensitivity

Like many men, when I hit my early thirties I started to get a little fat. At my heaviest I was just a little chunky. I think that at a certain point I started to become less sensitive to the hormone insulin, which in turn led to a host of other negative health effects. I’d like to share my experience of reversing this trend. With changes to my diet and lifestyle, I regained my insulin sensitivity. The day after Halloween seems like an appropriate day to write this post — for one thing I need to fortify my own willpower so I don’t eat too much of the leftover candy. No American would have called me fat, but a European from ten years ago might have singled me out as being able to lose a few pounds (these days Europeans are almost as chubby as Americans). It was a slow kind of weight gain, evenly distributed throughout my body, so it wasn’t very noticeable. I had been lean my whole life — all the way into my late twenties, so it took a few years to actually notice that I was getting heavier (and not from muscle). I remember one moment in particular when I was sitting down and caught my reflection in the mirror. My midsection was just too wide. When I asked for the brutal truth, my wife confirmed that I could lose a few pounds. That was it — I needed to get skinnier. I thought my diet at the time was “healthful,” but in fact it was horrible. I was eating a lot of “natural” breakfast cereals with soy milk. I rarely ate meat, chicken, or fish, and got most of my protein from beans, dairy products, and nuts. I ate plenty of fruit but not very many vegetables. My metabolism was a mess. I couldn’t go two hours without having a snack. Sometimes my snacks were fruit or nuts, but other times I might eat cookies or just grab a handful of chocolate chips. I was Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance With Intermittent Fasting

Reverse Insulin Resistance With Intermittent Fasting

Reverse Insulin Resistance with Intermittent Fasting Intermittent fasting is the best insulin resistance diet to help your cells respond to insulin. When your body gets the signal that youve eaten, beta cells in your pancreas produce insulin, a hormone that tells your cells to absorb glucose to use as fuel. Your cells respond by receiving the glucose from your bloodstream. This gives you the energy you need, and you dont pack on body fat. But sometimes, this communication gets thrown off. Insulin resistance is when insulin tells your cells that fuel is coming, but they dont open up to receive glucose. So, sugar stays in the bloodstream, and after a while your body stores it as fat. Read on to find out how intermittent fasting can fix insulin resistance. Heres a scenario. Youre hungry. Because youre hungry, youre annoyed with everything. You might even recognize that your blood sugar just dropped and you need to eat something. There are a couple things behind this: your blood sugar, your insulin, and how well your cells follow directions. When you eat and your body breaks down your food, the glucose (sugar) from your food goes into your bloodstream for transport to your cells. Glucose gives your cells the fuel they need to do their jobs. Insulin is a hormone that tells your cells to accept their delivery of glucose fuel. When your body gets the signal that youve eaten, beta cells in your pancreas produce insulin, which is what tells your cells absorb glucose. When you dont have insulin, such as when you have diabetes (more on this later), your cells do not allow glucose in and the glucose stays in your bloodstream. Once your body senses that glucose has been hanging around in your bloodstream for a while, it stores it as fat for later, because it thinks your cells dont Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

How To Reverse Diabetes Naturally

According to the 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report, over 30 million people living in the United States have diabetes. That’s almost 10 percent of the U.S. population. And diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, causing, at least in part, over 250,000 deaths in 2015. That’s why it’s so important to take steps to reverse diabetes and the diabetes epidemic in America. Type 2 diabetes is a dangerous disease that can lead to many other health conditions when it’s not managed properly, including kidney disease, blindness, leg and food amputations, nerve damage, and even death. (1) Type 2 diabetes is a completely preventable and reversible condition, and with diet and lifestyle changes, you can greatly reduce your chances of getting the disease or reverse the condition if you’ve already been diagnosed. If you are one of the millions of Americans struggling with diabetes symptoms, begin the steps to reverse diabetes naturally today. With my diabetic diet plan, suggested supplements and increased physical activity, you can quickly regain your health and reverse diabetes the natural way. The Diabetes Epidemic Diabetes has grown to “epidemic” proportions, and the latest statistics revealed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that 30.3 million Americans have diabetes, including the 7.2 million people who weren’t even aware of it. Diabetes is affecting people of all ages, including 132,000 children and adolescents younger than 18 years old. (2) The prevalence of prediabetes is also on the rise, as it’s estimated that almost 34 million U.S. adults were prediabetic in 2015. People with prediabetes have blood glucose levels that are above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. Without proper int Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance: An Actionable Guide

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance: An Actionable Guide

If you’ve been in the space of alternative health and wellness for a while, then you’ve likely heard the term ‘insulin resistance’ floating around. But if not, I’m going to do that right now so your brain can stop screeching to a halt every time it reads that word. What Does Insulin Do? Insulin is a hormone. To put it quite simply, you can think of hormones as “body messengers” that communicate and respond to everything from hunger signals to reproduction, to emotions and a heck of a lot more. Because we are an intelligent and integrated feedback loop, some hormones have more than one, and/or, overlapping functions. Insulin is produced in the pancreas (which is part of the endocrine system). Its major responsibility (which is uber important) is to help regulate blood sugar. When you eat foods that contain any form of sugar, that sugar gets broken down into glucose. By the way, when I say that foods containing sugar I’m not just talking about sweet foods. I’m also talking about any carbohydrate (both simple and complex) containing foods. In this case, flavor is secondary to chemical make-up because that’s what ultimately determines how it’s going to be digested. Let me give some examples of foods that will get broken down into glucose: Desserts: ice cream, cookies, cakes, pies, candy, dried fruit… Sweet drinks: gatorade, creamers, soda, koolaid, juices… Simple carbs: bread, pasta, crackers, cereals… Complex carbs: quinoa, oats, brown & wild rice, corn, sprouted wheats, plantains, cassava, turnips, squashes… Fiber-rich: most fruits, most vegetables, peas, beans, legumes Those foods, the ones above and the others I didn’t have space to include, once simplified into glucose molecules (this is what we mean when we say blood sugar) are then esc Continue reading >>

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

I’d like to take a moment to recognize the incredible 6-month transformation of Cynthia Bronte, one of my clients working diligently at reversing insulin resistance. This is another story that reflects the amazing mental, physical and emotional transformation that can occur with a strategic approach to plant-focused high-carbohydrate nutrition. Diagnosis with Type 2 Diabetes Cynthia was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2003, in the midst of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), an acute life-threatening condition that typically marks the onset of type 1 diabetes. Cynthia’s symptoms of DKA were unmistakable, and included urinating more than 14 times per day, insatiable thirst and low energy. Cynthia was unaware that her fasting blood sugar was 5 times higher than normal, at 550 mg/dL (normal blood sugars range from 70 – 130 mg/dL). Treatment Protocol When Cynthia was first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, she was instructed to consume a low carbohydrate diet in order to minimize blood sugar. She was instructed to eat foods that were high in protein and fat, while limiting her intake of fruits, artificial sweeteners, grains, pastas, rice, bread and cereal. As we’ve talked about in a previous article, she was initially instructed to minimize her intake of carbohydrates to minimize the amount of glucose that would eventually appear in her blood. Her diet plan followed what I refer to as “the linear diabetes nutrition model,” shown below. The problem with the linear model is that it does not address the underlying root cause of type 2 diabetes – insulin resistance. By eating a low carbohydrate diet, Cynthia was eating mainly fat and protein, resulting in increased lipid deposits in her liver and muscle tissue. In turn, increased fat storage in her liver and muscle resul Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: How Long Does It Take To Reverse?

Insulin Resistance: How Long Does It Take To Reverse?

Insulin resistance can be reversed with diet and exercise, but how long does it usually take? So how long should it take to reverse your insulin resistance? I asked Dr. David Edelson, MD, board certified in internal and bariatric medicine, one of the top obesity experts in the U.S., and founder and medical director HealthBridge and thin-site.com. Insulin resistance can lead to prediabetes, which of course can morph into type 2 diabetes. Thus, it’s extremely important to reverse insulin resistance, even though the time it takes will not occur overnight. How long it took to acquire insulin resistance didn’t happen overnight, either. Dr. Edelson explains, “I’ve seen our patients with early stage insulin resistance able to reverse it and normalize their fasting insulin levels in 6-12 weeks.” The three key areas to work on, when it comes to reversing insulin resistance, are: 1) Weight loss, 2) Exercise, and 3) Changes in diet. Dr. Edelson continues, “If you let the ‘fuse burn’ too far, it becomes harder and harder to reverse insulin resistance.” Insulin resistance can be thought of as being on a continuum. On one end, the left side, is normal glucose metabolism. All the way at the other end, on the right side of the continuum, is type 2 diabetes. These two points are connected by a fuse. It ignites at the left end at early insulin resistance, but if left untreated, that lit fuse burns its way along the continuum, towards the prediabetic point, and as it progresses further down the continuum, it becomes more difficult to reverse. Dr. Edelson says, “There also is a point where it can no longer be reversed, when the pancreas has essentially ‘burned out’ and can no longer produce enough insulin to meet the body’s needs. This is why it is so important to Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance At Midlife

How To Reverse Insulin Resistance At Midlife

Insulin resistance has become a huge problem in our culture and it can lead to many of the chronic health problems we see today, including obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease. It is also linked to high blood pressure, high cholesterol, thyroid problems, muscle loss, fat gain, fatty liver, breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and other cancers as well. And, insulin resistance has even been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, did you know that insulin resistance can also cause many of the symptoms most women attribute to menopause? It’s true. Insulin has a cascading effect on all of your hormones, including estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. When insulin isn’t doing its job, it’s nearly impossible to reduce the symptoms of menopause, including hot flashes and night sweats. It also makes weight loss very difficult. Jason Fung, M.D. – who you can listen to on my radio show, Flourish – has done much research in the area of insulin control. His work shows that getting insulin in balance can be the key to getting your hormones and your health back in balance. What is Insulin and How Does It Work? Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Its main job is to manage how your body uses glucose for energy. When blood sugar levels rise after a meal, your pancreas releases insulin to help your body’s cells — especially cells in the liver and muscles — absorb glucose. Your liver converts stored glucose to glycogen for future use. When blood sugar levels are too low, your pancreas releases a hormone called glucagon. Glucagon forces the liver to convert glycogen back to glucose, which causes your blood sugar to rise. You always have low levels of insulin circulating in your body. When insulin is out of balance, the result is abnormal blood sugar Continue reading >>

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