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Can Insulin Cause Nausea

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information For Soliqua® 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

Important Safety Information For Soliqua® 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

What is the most important information I should know about SOLIQUA 100/33? Do not share your SOLIQUA 100/33 pen with other people, even if the needle has been changed. SOLIQUA 100/33 can cause serious side effects, including inflammation of the pancreas, which may be life-threatening. Before using SOLIQUA 100/33, tell your doctor if you have had pancreatitis, stones in your gallbladder, or a history of alcoholism. These medical problems may make you more likely to get pancreatitis. Stop taking SOLIQUA 100/33 and call your healthcare provider right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe, and will not go away. The pain may be felt in the back area. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. Who should not use SOLIQUA 100/33? Do not use SOLIQUA 100/33 if you are having an episode of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine, lixisenatide, or any of the ingredients in SOLIQUA 100/33. Tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you: have or have had problems with your pancreas, your kidneys, or your liver, stones in your gallbladder, or a history of alcoholism. have heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs (thiazolidinediones). have severe problems with your stomach, such as slowed emptying of your stomach or problems digesting food. are pregnant or breastfeeding or plan to become pregnant or to breastfeed. It is not known if SOLIQUA 100/33 will harm your unborn baby or pass into your breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including all prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. SOLIQUA 100/33 may affect the way some medicines work. Before using SOLIQUA 100/33 Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

The symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop very quickly (over a few days or weeks), particularly in children. In older adults, the symptoms can often take longer to develop (a few months). However, they should disappear when you start taking insulin and the condition is under control. The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling very thirsty urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk itchiness around the genital area, or regular bouts of thrush (a yeast infection) blurred vision caused by the lens of your eye changing shape slow healing of cuts and grazes Vomiting or heavy, deep breathing can also occur at a later stage. This is a dangerous sign and requires immediate admission to hospital for treatment. See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. When to seek urgent medical attention You should seek urgent medical attention if you have diabetes and develop: a loss of appetite nausea or vomiting a high temperature stomach pain fruity smelling breath – which may smell like pear drops or nail varnish (others will usually be able to smell it, but you won't) Hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) If you have diabetes, your blood glucose levels can become very low. This is known as hypoglycaemia (or a "hypo"), and it's triggered when injected insulin in your body moves too much glucose out of your bloodstream. In most cases, hypoglycaemia occurs as a result of taking too much insulin, although it can also develop if you skip a meal, exercise very vigorously or drink alcohol on an empty stomach. Symptoms of a "hypo" include: feeling shaky and irritable sweating tingling lips feeling weak feeling confused hunger nausea (feeling sick) A hypo can be brought under control simply by eating or drinking somethin Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Humalog Side Effects Center

Humalog Side Effects Center

Humalog (insulin lispro [rDNA origin]) Injection is a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults. Humalog is usually given together with another long-acting insulin. Humalog is also used together with oral medications to treat type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults. Common side effects of Humalog include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation). Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), is the most common side effect of insulin lispro such as Humalog. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusions, or seizure (convulsions). Low blood potassium levels (hypokalemia). Symptoms include dry mouth, increased thirst, increased urination, uneven heartbeats, muscle pain or weakness, leg pain or discomfort, or confusion The total daily insulin requirement varies and the dose is usually between 0.5 to 1 unit/kg/day. Insulin needs may be altered during stress, major illness, or changes in exercise, meal patterns, or co-administered drugs. Humalog may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin lispro on lowering blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Humalog. Discuss a plan for managing blood sugars with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin used during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Humalog (insulin lispro, USP [rDNA origin]) Inj Continue reading >>

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

What To Do With Insulin When Your Diabetic Pet Is Vomiting Or Not Eating

Once you have your diabetic pet regulated on insulin it’s smooth sailing, right? Well, not necessarily. Even a well-regulated diabetic doggie may mischievously get into the trash and subsequently vomit. Or Fluffy might toss up a random hair ball. Just because your pet is diabetic doesn’t mean it can’t have a dietary indiscretion or gastroenteritis the same as non-diabetic pets! Even if you are new to having a diabetic pet, if you understand the basics of diabetes (most importantly that insulin drops the blood sugar levels) you can work your way through a short-term treatment plan. You know that insulin allows sugar (from the food we eat) to enter our cells. Without food, giving the usual dose of insulin could drop the blood glucose to dangerously low levels. However, if the blood glucose is still quite elevated, you might consider giving a lesser dose of insulin even if a diabetic won’t eat. You know your pet… Some have a sensitive stomach whereas others might have the constitution as sturdy as a goat. Some have ravenous appetites whereas other pets may be finicky. None of us have a crystal ball when it comes to predicting if a pet will vomit more. Not eating and vomiting are both situations that put us in the same boat in regards to insulin dosing. No food in the tummy means there is nothing for the insulin to utilize. Of course, vomiting is worse than simply not eating because we don’t know why the pet is nauseous nor if there will be more vomiting to follow. Not eating may simply be that a pet isn’t hungry. Obviously you need a good relationship with your veterinarian to help you work through contingency plans for these situations, but I want you to understand in general what we might do. Of course making choices to alter the insulin dose mandates that Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: hunger, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. Lantus should be administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once a day at the same time every day. Dose is determined by the individual and the desired blood glucose levels. Lantus may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin glargine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Lantus. Discuss a plan to manage blood sugar with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Nausea

Diabetes And Nausea

Diabetes can be associated with an increased risk of nausea. There are several reasons why a diabetic might have more nausea when compared to those without diabetes. Some things that contribute to nausea in diabetics include the following: Diabetic medications. Some of the injectable medications used in the management of diabetes will increase the risk of nausea. Common injectable diabetic medications include Symlin (pramlintide), Victoza (liraglutide), and Byetta (exenatide). There is some evidence to suggest that the nausea associated with these medications is temporary and will go away the longer you take the medications. Your physician may also try a lesser dose of the medication in the beginning to try and lessen the risk of nausea. Hypoglycemia or Hyperglycemia. Both elevated blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) and low blood glucose levels (hypoglycemia) carry the risk of developing nausea. In order to reduce the incidence of nausea, you need to check your blood glucose levels on a regular basis and use insulin (or other diabetic medications) to keep your blood sugar within the normal range. Besides medications for blood sugar control, you can avoid the nausea of blood glucose abnormalities, you need to eat a healthy diet and exercise—both surefire ways of controlling the blood sugar levels. One other thing you can do is avoid doing any type of exercise when the environment is too hot or too cold. Drink cold water or electrolyte solution while exercising outdoors in order to maintain adequate hydration and to keep your blood sugars in good control. Diabetic ketoacidosis. One of the signs that you might have diabetic ketoacidosis is the presence of nausea. Diabetic ketoacidosis happens when the blood sugar cannot enter the cells so that the cells of the body mus Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

A low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia or an insulin reaction, is defined as a blood glucose level below 60 to 70 mg/dl. It is usually companied by one or more of the symptoms described below. Low blood sugars or insulin reactions can occur whenever insulin is used. Although less frequent, it can also occur with use of drugs that stimulate insulin production in Type 2 diabetes, such as Diabenese, Glyburide, Glipizide, and Starlix. Hypoglycemia symptoms vary greatly. Lows may occur with no symptoms, minor symptoms, or full-blown symptoms. They will vary from person to person and from one low to the next in the same person. A single symptom may make you aware that your blood sugar has become low, or you may suddenly become aware of several symptoms at once. Symptoms are created both by the effect of the low blood sugar on the brain and other organs, and by the effects of adrenaline and glucagon which are released in large quantities to raise the blood sugar. Anytime you suspect a low blood sugar, check it to be sure and, if you are low, raise your sugar quickly with glucose tablets or other fast carbohydrates. If you're too confused to check, eat quick carbs and check later. The faster you recognize hypoglycemia, the faster you can respond and bring the blood sugar back to normal. Keep in mind that you do not want to eat too much when you treat a low blood sugar, or you can begin a blood sugar rollercoaster. Identify the symptoms for insulin reactions so you can take action quickly. Insulin Reaction Symptoms shaking sweating irritability headache tingling hunger blurred vision dizziness and confusion numbness of the lips nausea or vomiting fast heart rate sudden tiredness seizures pale appearance frequent sighing personality change confusion or poor concentation loss Continue reading >>

Insulin (parenteral Route)

Insulin (parenteral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex Never share insulin pens or cartridges with others under any circumstances. It is not safe for one pen to be used for more than one person. Sharing needles or pens can result in transmission of hepatitis viruses, HIV, or other blood-borne illnesses. It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks of insulin treatment. It is very important to follow carefully any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Tobacco—If you have been smoking for a long time and suddenly stop, your dosage of insulin may need to be reduced. If you decide to quit, tell your doctor first. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes, especially teenagers, may need special counseling about insulin dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in women with diabetes who become pregnant. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would normally. Make allowances for changing time zones, keep your meal times as close as possible to your usual meal times, and store insulin properly. In case of emergency—Ther Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis doesn’t sound good, and it isn’t. Literally “stomach paralysis,” it is a form of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage, that is a common complication of diabetes. The damaged nerve in question is the vagus nerve, named for its vagabond-like wandering nature. The vagus nerve meanders all the way from the brainstem to the colon, controlling heart rate, sweating, gastrointestinal contractions, and various other involuntary, automatic functions on its way. In the case of gastroparesis, it’s the vagus nerve’s control of stomach contractions that’s damaged. The stomach is basically a hollow ball made of muscle that serves as a storage container and mixing bowl for food. It’s about the size of a small melon, but it can stretch to hold nearly a gallon if you really press the issue. In healthy people, wave-like contractions of the stomach, prompted by the vagus nerve, crush and churn your food into small particles and mix it up with enzymes and acids produced by the stomach’s inner lining. Then the stomach contractions, coming along in waves at about three per minute, slowly and evenly propel the pulverized food out through the pyloric valve, which opens just enough to release an eighth of an ounce of food at a time. From there it’s down the small intestine, where the real nutrient absorption occurs. It can take four hours to empty your stomach into your small intestine, especially if you’ve eaten fat, which slows the process down. If the vagus nerve has been damaged by years of high blood sugars, the process hits a snag. The walls of the stomach, paralyzed by the lack of vagus nerve stimulation, don’t make their muscular wave-like contractions. As a result, food just sticks around in the stomach, unpulverized and going nowhere. It may sit an Continue reading >>

Vomiting, Nausea, And Diarrhea – Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication

Vomiting, Nausea, And Diarrhea – Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication

Vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea are most commonly caused by bacterial or viral infections sometimes associated with flu-like illness. An essential part of treatment is to stop eating. Since you can certainly survive a few days without eating, this should pose no problem. But if you’re not eating, it makes sense to ask what dose of insulin or ISA you should take. Adjusting Your Diabetes Medication If you’re on one of the medication regimens described in this book, the answer is simple: you take the amount and type of medication that you’d normally take to cover the basal, or fasting, state and skip any doses that are intended to cover meals. If, for example, you ordinarily take detemir or glargine as basal insulin upon arising and at bedtime, and regular or lispro (or aspart or glulisine) insulin before meals, you’d continue the basal insulin and skip the preprandial regular or lispro for those meals you won’t be eating. Similarly, if you take an ISA on arising and/or at bedtime for the fasting state, and again to cover meals, you skip the doses for those meals that you do not plan to eat. In both of the above cases, it’s essential that the medications used for the fasting state continue at their full doses. This is in direct contradiction to traditional “sick day” treatment, but it’s a major reason why patients who carefully follow our regimens should not develop DKA or hyperosmolar coma when they are ill. Of course, if you’re vomiting, you won’t be able to keep down oral medication and this poses yet another problem. Remember, because infection and dehydration may each cause blood sugar to increase, you may need additional coverage for any blood sugar elevation. Such additional coverage should usually take the form of lispro insulin. This is one of Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Is Diabetes Causing My Nausea?

Nausea comes in many forms. Sometimes it can be mild and short-lived. Other times, it can be severe and last for a long time. For people with diabetes, nausea is a common complaint. It can even be a sign of a life-threatening condition that requires swift medical attention. 5 common causes of nausea Factors related to your diabetes may cause you to feel nausea. Medication Metformin (Glucophage) is one of the more common medications used to treat diabetes. Nausea is a potential side effect for people taking this medication. Taking metformin on an empty stomach may make nausea worse. Injectable medications used to treat diabetes, such as exenatide (Byetta), liraglutide (Victoza), and pramlintide (Symlin), may also cause nausea. The nausea may go away after extended use. Your doctor may also start you on a lower dosage to try to reduce or eliminate nausea. Hypo- and hyperglycemia Hyperglycemia (elevated blood sugar levels) or hypoglycemia (blood sugar levels that are too low) may cause nausea. Check your blood sugar and respond appropriately if you suspect abnormal blood sugar levels. To avoid hypo- and hyperglycemia, stick to your diabetes meal plan, monitor your blood sugar, and take your medication as prescribed. You should also avoid exercising in extreme temperatures and keep cool by drinking cold liquids during outside activities, advises Sheri Colberg, PhD, author, exercise physiologist, and expert on diabetes management. Diabetic ketoacidosis Severe nausea may be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a dangerous medical condition that must be treated to avoid coma or even death. Symptoms include: nausea excessive thirst frequent urination abdominal pain weakness or fatigue shortness of breath confusion fruity-scented breath If you suspect diabetic ketoacidosis, Continue reading >>

Common Side Effects Of Trulicity

Common Side Effects Of Trulicity

Everyone’s experience is different, but there are some changes that you may notice when you start taking Trulicity. From a change in blood sugar and A1C numbers to common side effects, the information below will help you understand what you can expect when you start Trulicity. How can Trulicity benefit you Blood sugar levels In studies, Trulicity has been proven to lower blood sugar levels. People may notice a reduction in blood sugar before and after meals. In some studies, most people taking Trulicity noted better blood sugar numbers before eating in the morning (fasting blood sugar). A1C reduction Trulicity may offer lasting A1C improvements. In a study, some Trulicity users saw a significant improvement when their A1C was measured after 6 months, and it was still improved after they had been taking Trulicity for 1 year. If you do not reach your A1C goal after 6 months, talk to your healthcare provider about adjusting your medications, diet, or exercise routine. Some people may experience nausea after starting on Trulicity. In studies, 8%-29% using Trulicity experienced some nausea, which typically occurred during the first 2-3 days after they took their first dose. Nausea generally subsides after the first 2 weeks, but some people experienced nausea with Trulicity beyond their second week of treatment. Less than 2% needed to stop taking Trulicity because of nausea. The most common gastrointestinal side effects with Trulicity may include: nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain and decreased appetite.* If you experience nausea, talk to your doctor. In the meantime, you may find the following tips helpful: Eat smaller meals — try splitting your three daily meals into four or more smaller ones Stop eating when you feel full Avoid fried or fatty foods Try eating Continue reading >>

Hyperinsulinemia Symptoms

Hyperinsulinemia Symptoms

Hyperinsulinemia is a condition where the blood insulin level is higher than what is considered normal in people without diabetes. Although hyperinsulinemia is not diabetes, the condition is often associated with type 2 diabetes. People with hyperinsulinemia have difficulty maintaining a normal blood sugar level, which means the pancreas has to produce increasing amounts of insulin in order to control it. The primary cause of hyperinsulinemia is insulin resistance, which occurs when the insulin level remains high enough over a long period for the body to become less sensitive to the hormone. This means that the body’s usual response to a given amount of insulin is decreased, which results in the pancreas secreting higher levels of insulin in order for the hormone to exert its usual effects. The pancreas produces increasing levels of insulin until eventually it can no longer produce enough to meet the body’s needs. This leads to a rise in the blood sugar level and insulin resistance is therefore a risk factor for the development of diabetes. In rare cases, hyperinsulinemia may be caused by the presence of a tumor in the insulin-producing cells (islets of Langerhans) of the pancreas. This tumor is referred to as an insulinoma. Another rare cause is a condition called nesidioblastosis, a genetic disorder where abnormal islets of Langerhans produce an excess of insulin. Insulin resistance may occur in response to the body’s endogenous insulin or exogenous insulin given via injection. Insulin resistance is closely associated with inflammation and is thought to be caused by cytokine release disrupting the usual action of insulin. The chronic inflammation seen in obesity can therefore increases the risk of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of insulin resistance One of the first Continue reading >>

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