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Can I Use Metformin To Regulate My Periods?

Does Having A Period Consistently On Metformin Mean That I Am Ovulating?

Does Having A Period Consistently On Metformin Mean That I Am Ovulating?

Does having a period consistently on Metformin mean that I am ovulating? Does having a period consistently on Metformin mean that I am ovulating? I have been taking metforin for that past 4 months and for the last three months I have been having a regular monthly period. I was just woundering if anyone knew if this means that I am ovulating each month or not. I am not sure if the fact that my cycle is becoming regular means that I am ovulating. I have been told a number of things and I am so confused. Any help would be great. Re: Does having a period consistently on Metformin mean that I am ovulating? you could try charting your cycles, that would show if you are ovulating or not. My guess is you probably are. I started having regular cycles after a month or so on met, but it still took 2 more years for me to get pregnant. if you want some onfo on charting check out the book "Taking Charge of Your Fertility" by Toni Weschler Re: Does having a period consistently on Metformin mean that I am ovulating? My doctor says if you're having a regular period, you are ovulating...about 14 days from the start of your period, check and see if you having any cramping, any clear discharge, cravings, bloating, etc... Re: Does having a period consistently on Metformin mean that I am ovulating? I have been on Metformin for 2 years and am calender regular. I have had many CT for other issues. The cysts are still there so I am not ovulating. Therefore the answer to your question is not necessarily. Re: Does having a period consistently on Metformin mean that I am ovulating? I suggest that you check for signs of ovulation... like what Sugafoot said. Because as 2Plus1 said, just because your cycles are very regular doesn't necessarily mean that you are ovulating (though I hope you are!). To Continue reading >>

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Here at Flo Living headquarters I speak with many women suffering with PCOS who have either been offered Metformin and decided against it or have tried Metformin and it’s not worked for them. If you have a diagnosis of PCOS it’s very likely that at some point your doctor has suggested Metformin. I personally was what would be considered the “perfect” candidate for this treatment when I was in my 20s and suffering with PCOS – overweight, struggling with acne and a complete lack of periods. However, I never tried it myself – instead I created a protocol for myself that became Flo Living. I’ve since helped many women manage their PCOS successfully with this protocol, just as I did my own diagnosis. That said, I speak with women so often about the Metformin option that I want to share my perspective with you. Although I do not dismiss the option completely, I do have some caveats and concerns. What is Metformin? Metformin is a first-line medication for those suffering with type 2 diabetes. It is also presented as a treatment for PCOS sufferers who are also overweight or obese. Not all PCOS sufferers have weight gain as a symptom, it depends on the kind of PCOS. Women with the kind of PCOS that causes weight gain are usually insulin resistant. Metformin reduces overall insulin levels. Insulin resistance is when the cells of your body become resistant to the hormone insulin, preventing glucose from entering your cells to be used for energy, and instead causing soaring levels of sugar blood stream bringing about diabetes, pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant PCOS. The connection between insulin and PCOS is blood sugar regulation. We hear about this most commonly with diabetes, but it’s also very important with PCOS. An unstable, constantly spiking and crashing, bl Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. But should it be? What is the real relationship between metformin and PCOS? Can Metformin used for PCOS help lessen PCOS symptoms? Metformin used for PCOS: The Science PCOS is an infertility condition that often causes acne, facial hair growth, balding, low sex drive, weight gain, difficulty with weight loss, and mental health disturbances such as depression and anxiety in approximately 15% of women. It is also associated with a myriad of health conditions, spanning from diabetes to hypothyroidism and to heart disease. PCOS is, in short, not a condition to sneeze at. PCOS is a condition of hormone imbalance. With PCOS, male sex hormones such as testosterone and DHEA-S rise relative to the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. (…Roughly speaking – it’s complicated. For a full-blown account of the science of PCOS and how it affects you, see here.) Elevated testosterone is very often the primary culprit in causing PCOS. (But not always! For one of my most thorough accounts of other things that can cause PCOS, see here.) Insulin causes testosterone levels to rise because insulin tells the ovaries to produce testosterone. Basically, elevated insulin causes elevated testosterone, which causes PCOS. This is where metformin comes into play. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels below what they would otherwise be after a meal. This is because it intervenes with the liver’s interaction with and production of glucose. Insulin is the body’s way of dealing with blood sugar. If blood sugar is lower, then insulin will be lower, and thus testosterone will be lower. Metformin decreases blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Regulating Periods With Metformin

Regulating Periods With Metformin

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. So, my first cycle after stopping BCP was 68 days long. It was a pretty short period. One day of bad cramping and heavy bleeding, then one day of spotting. I actually called my obgyn to make sure I should actually count that as a period and not take Provera. She said to count it. Then I started Metformin in October right after that 68 day cycle. My next cycle was 38 days long. Period was exactly the same as the previous one. I was pretty excited about it practically being only half as long as the previous cycle. I was hoping (and kind of assuming) that my next cycle would be 38 days or less. Now, I am on CD45 and I am not sure what to think. This cycle, aside from being longer than the last, has been vastly different. I have had mild lower back cramping on and off for about 3 weeks now and a definite increase in CM. I didn't have any cramping last cycle except for CD1 when I started. And while I did have CM last cycle, it was nowhere near as much as this one. I've also been crazy emotional. My best guess is that my hormones are still adjusting and I am just having a wonky cycle. I know it can normally take a few months for Metformin to regulate your period. My fear is that the first Metformin cycle was a fluke and I am not going to see the same success again. So, I guess my question is: did any of you ladies have similar experiences on your first few months of Metformin? If it did eventually regulate your periods, how long did it take? Thanks for your input, ladies! I finally started today so that puts my seco Continue reading >>

Absent Menstruation (amenorrhea) And Pcos

Absent Menstruation (amenorrhea) And Pcos

Copyright 2017 Insulite Health. All rights reserved. Absent Menstruation (Amenorrhea) and PCOS Is PCOS Disrupting Your Natural Menstrual Cycle? Have you experienced missing periods associated with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome? You are not alone! Missed periods, or Amenorrhea, is a very common symptom of PCOS, along with other types of menstrual irregularities. Missing one period is not usually considered a major issue because most women experience that a few times in their lives; however, missing three periods in a one-year span is one of the criteria for diagnosing PCOS. A large number of women actually discover they have PCOS when they seek help for irregular or missing periods. Amenorrhea can be a major concern because absence of menstruation can create infertility issues.3 To avoid future distress it is better to try to correct your Amenorrhea by addressing PCOS and the conditions that influence its severity like Insulin Resistance. Amenorrhea can be chronic or occur temporarily because of an underlying condition. It is classified as primary or secondary depending on when and how it manifests. Primary Amenorrhea: ?This is when menstruation does not commence by age 14 and secondary sex characteristics such as breast development are absent. Girls who develop normally but do not start their period by 16 also have primary amenorrhea.2 Secondary Amenorrhea: ?The absence of period for three consecutive cycles in a woman who previously menstruated. Women who are on birth control, pregnant, or lactating are excluded from this classification.1 Your menstrual cycle is influenced by many factors, such as stress, diet, lifestyle choices, medications, and underlying conditions such as PCOS. Understanding PCOS and treating this condition can improve menstrual irregularities like Continue reading >>

Metformin - Trying To Conceive - Essential Baby

Metformin - Trying To Conceive - Essential Baby

I have recently been diagnosed with PCOS after TTC for 16 months. And my gyno prescribed me with Metformin, has anyone taken this or is anyone taking it at the moment id love to know side effects / success stories... Hi! I was put on metformin a few years back due to pcos - i am now off it as pregnant i had it to help with insulin and other hormonal effects but my fertility specialist also said when i was ttc it would increase chances of falling pregnant and decrease chances of loss. I always had a couple of ginger pills half an hour before taking it for the first few weeks - had the slow release and took overnight. i was fine though i discovered if i took nurofen they clashed and had me running to the toilet. Hi, I suffered from secondary infertility - turns out I too had PCOS, insulin resistance, hormones out of whack (and some other stuff) - my OB/GYN put me on metformin, I also lost a bit of weight and followed a low GI diet. Thisfixed the insulin resistance and regulated my hormones and I fell pregnant. I stayed on the metformin for my entire pregnancy. It all went well. Good luck! Hi, I have PCOS and have used Metformin including a recent baby this year.I have all the symptoms and it does take me longer to get pregnant. But I have got 5 kids! For the last two pregnancies I couldn't get pregnant without Metformin. It usually takes a couple of months to be fully effective. Also prior to this new baby I had MC as didn't bother taking the Metform. Stupidly thought I could do without it. So went back on Metformin and had my new baby this year. Thanks for your replys may I ask how long it took to fall pregnant after starting metformin? I tired for 4 years for our 3rd and in that time and the following 2 years after that (so 6 years) had 4 early losses as well. Last yea Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin On Body Mass Index, Menstrual Cyclicity, And Ovulation Induction In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

Effects Of Metformin On Body Mass Index, Menstrual Cyclicity, And Ovulation Induction In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

Effects of metformin on body mass index, menstrual cyclicity, and ovulation induction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 75235, USA. Metformin has been used as a treatment in many studies of the infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We will review the literature on this topic as it specifically relates to changes in body mass index (BMI), improvement in menstrual cyclicity, and effects on ovulation and pregnancy rates. Review of studies addressing biochemical and clinical changes in women with PCOS on metformin. Changes in BMI, menstrual cyclicity, ovulation rate, and pregnancy rate. Metformin has been shown to produce small but significant reductions in BMI. Multiple observational studies have confirmed an improvement in menstrual cyclicity with metformin therapy. The studies addressing the concomitant use of metformin with clomiphene citrate initially predicted great success, but these have been followed by more modest results. There is little data in the literature concerning the use of metformin and hMGs. Some (but not all) women with PCOS have improvements in their menstrual cycles while on metformin. The data supporting the use of metformin in ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate and hMG remain to be confirmed by large, randomized, prospective studies. Continue reading >>

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Fertility Treatment With Metformin (glucophage)

How Metformin Is Used for Polycystic Ovaries Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a common cause of anovulation and infertility in women. These women do not ovulate (release eggs) regularly and therefore have irregular menstrual periods. The ovaries have many small cysts (2-7 mm diameter) called antral follicles, giving the ovaries a characteristic "polycystic" (many cysts) appearance on ultrasound. A relatively new method of treating ovulation problems in women with polycystic ovarian disease is to use an oral medication called metformin (brand name is Glucophage). Metformin has traditionally been used as an oral drug to help control diabetes. Then, some smart doctor figured out that polycystic ovarian syndrome treatment with metformin can be very effective. If Glucophage alone does not result in ovulation and pregnancy, we often use: If the combination therapy is not effective, we can try: Metformin Use with IVF Treatment We also use Glucophage in women going through in vitro fertilization for PCOS, and for those with very high antral follicle counts - if their ovaries are "polycystic" by ultrasound. We find that some women with polycystic ovaries respond with a "smoother" response to the injectable FSH medication if they have been taking Glucophage. Risks and Side Effects of Metformin / Glucophage In about 25% of women Glucophage causes side effects which may include abdominal discomfort, cramping, diarrhea and nausea. The side effects may be severe enough to make the woman stop the Glucophage medication. We are not aware of any serious complications resulting from Glucophage treatment. Another oral medication used for diabetes called Troglitazone has been associated with liver failure and death in rare cases. This has been publicized on television shows, in newspapers, et Continue reading >>

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Although some women with PCOS have regular periods, high levels of androgens ('male' hormones) and excess insulin can disrupt the monthly cycle of ovulation and menstruation. If you have PCOS, your periods may be 'irregular' or stop altogether. The average menstrual cycle is 28 days with one ovulation when eggs are released, but anywhere between 21 and 35 days is considered 'normal'. An 'irregular' period cycle is defined as either: Eight or less menstrual cycles per year Menstrual cycles longer than 35 days Some women with PCOS also experience heavier or lighter bleeding during their menstrual cycle. Regular periods help to prevent excess thickening of the lining of the uterus (womb). Long gaps between periods can lead to abnormal cells building up inside the womb. It is important you have at least four cycles per year to avoid a build up that may include abnormal cells. Treatment options Hormonal contraception Your doctor can prescribe hormonal contraception to help regulate your menstrual periods. The medication can also reduce menstrual cramps, acne and excess hair growth. These medications include: A low–dose oral contraceptive pill ('the pill') Progesterone which stimulates the uterus and induces bleeding Hormonal implants Vaginal contraceptive rings Intra-uterine devices containing progesterone How they work The oestrogen and progesterone in hormonal contraception act to override the body's normal hormonal control of the menstrual cycle and ovulation. The oral contraceptive pill works by "switching the ovaries off", which means that when a woman is taking the pill the production of hormones such as testosterone is greatly reduced. The pill also increases the body's production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), which binds to the main androgen testosterone Continue reading >>

Anyone Regulate With Just 500mg/day Metformin?

Anyone Regulate With Just 500mg/day Metformin?

Anyone regulate with JUST 500mg/day Metformin? I usually exercise quite a bit but I didn't exercise as much when I lost the 30 pounds. I didn't have as much energy to exercise. I still did some running on my treadmill maybe 30 min running (around 3 miles) 3 times a week. The loss of weight was pretty effortless but I did eat very small portions at regular intervals. My appetite was really low. When I say small portions I mean about 3-4 tablespoons of food or the size of 1-2 chinese dumplings for a meal. The metformin also meant if I had anything slightly sugary I got diarrhea. Edited by: GRANDWORLD at: 2/21/2010 (10:43) This is all really interesting. I haven't had the chance to talk with anyone who suffers from PCOS. I was first prescribed 500mg/twice a day and after 2 months was upped to 1,000/twice a day. Is that alot? All the talk about liver damage really scares me. I also haven't had a period yet. My endo talks about putting me on bc pills but I lost alot of hair when I was on them before. When you lost the 30lbs how much did you exercise aside from the side effects of the metformin? I have been on metformin 3 X 500 mg tablet a day (1500) for about 2 years now. It has regulated my periods down from about every 6 weeks to 3/4 months to pretty regular 6 week cycle and from when I ovulate I can predict my period pretty acurately. In terms of PCOS symptoms I have irregular periods, 'waxy skin' and insulin resistence. I don't have any excess hair etc. There seem to be different types of PCOS. Metformin helped with my insulin resistence (I could eat bread again) and period regularity and even made me feel more feminine and my skin looked better etc. It made me realize how many of my lifetime conditions where to do with PCOS. I started on 2X500 mg as at first there are Continue reading >>

9 Ways To Kick Start Your Period With Pcos

9 Ways To Kick Start Your Period With Pcos

9 Ways to Kick Start your Period with PCOS One of the symptoms that most women with PCOS struggle with is an irregular menstrual cycle. It impacts on fertility and is an indication that our bodies are simply not doing what they are meant to be doing. So, lets have a look at 8 ways to kick start your period with PCOS. Before we get on to that, lets explore why women with PCOS have an irregular cycle. What is going on with that? Why do Women with PCOS have an Irregular Menstrual Cycle? To understand how to kick start a period, we need to understand what is actually happening in our bodies to cause an irregular menstrual cycle. In the diagram below, you can see that just before ovulation, there is a spike in levels of luteinizing hormone (LH). The problem is that many women with PCOS have high levels of LH throughout their cycle. That means that you arent getting that spike of LH so no ovulation is being triggered. Now, the next problem is that youll see that progesterone levels go up after ovulation. This is because progesterone is produced by the corpus luteum (the left over follicle, after the egg has been released. It is the sharp fall of progesterone that causes a bleed. If we are not ovulating, we wont have a corpus luteum to produce the progesterone. If we have no progesterone, we are not going to have a period. We have one more thing that we need to consider. ANDROGENS or testosterone, The American Congress of Obstetricans and Gynecologists suggest that high levels of testosterone also impact on ovulation and may prevent an egg from being released ( 1 ). How can we kick start a period with PCOS? Unfortunately when it comes to kickstarting a period, we need to be patient. You see, it takes a while for hormones to balance, for the egg to develop before ovulation. Th Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help Women With Pcos?

Can Metformin Help Women With Pcos?

Home / Fertility / Boosting Fertility We asked doctors whether the drug Metformin really helps women with PCOS conceive, reduce miscarriage risk and increase milk supply. Here's what they say. If you have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), you're not alone. According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information , this hormonal disorder affects between 5 percent and 15 percent of women of reproductive age in this country. In polycystic ovary syndrome, cysts develop on the ovaries, and the body produces excess hormones called androgens, which cause an irregular menstrual cycle. As a result, ovulation can be unpredictable, and getting pregnant can be challenging. "Since puberty, I've averaged one menstrual cycle per year," says Carrie, a mother from the Midwest who has PCOS. "I always wondered if I could have children." Carrie tried getting pregnant for several months, but wasn't able to because she wasn't ovulating. After evaluating her bloodwork, her OB/GYN suggested she go on either Clomid or Metformin to help balance her hormones to promote ovulation. "Because I had a very slight imbalance in my hormones, my doctor suggested trying Metformin before going straight to Clomid. Since I heard horror stories about Clomid causing multiples, I was happy to try Metformin first," Carrie says. Metformin is a diabetes medication that is sometimes used to regulate hormones in women with PCOS by balancing their insulin level. This effect leads to more regular menstruation and ovulation cycles , according to WebMD . Carrie got pregnant the first month she took Metformin. But not all women with polycystic ovary syndrome have such good results. In fact, experts say more evidence is needed to prove that Metformin helps conception in PCOS patients . "When putting all the data tog Continue reading >>

Irregular Periods: How To Get Pregnant + Infertility

Irregular Periods: How To Get Pregnant + Infertility

whether or not you can time sex for pregnancy accurately Some women with irregular cycles will need to use fertility treatments . Sometimes, making lifestyle changes can regulate previously irregular periods and help you conceive. An irregular period is defined as amenstrual cycle that is either shorter than 21 days, or longer than 36 days. Your cycle may also be considered irregular if they vary significantly from month to month. For example, if one month your cycle is 23 days, and another it's 35, and then another it's 30, you might say you have irregular cycles. An occasional irregular cycle is normal. Stress or illness can cause a delay in ovulation or menstruation, causing your cycle to be longer, and sometimes shorter, than usual. If you have just one or two "off" periods a year, don't worry. However, if your cycles are frequently irregularor you go quite a long time between menstrual cyclesyou should see your doctor for an evaluation. What Causes of Irregular Cycles Make It Harder to Conceive? As mentioned above, the cause behind irregular cycles has a lot to do with your chances of getting pregnant. Sometimes, irregular periods are a sign of anovulation . Anovulatory cycles are menstrual cycles where ovulation doesn't take place. If you're not ovulating, you can't get pregnant . Irregular periods may be a sign of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) . Depending on whether you ovulate on your own or not, you may be able to get pregnant by yourself with PCOS. A common cause of irregular periods and decreased fertility is obesity . Being overweight (or underweight) can disrupt your menstrual cycles and make it harder to get pregnant. Extreme exercise and extreme dieting are also potential causes of irregular cycles. Female athletes are more likely to experience infe Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder of body metabolism that affects 5-10% of women and can cause infrequent periods, weight gain, acne, unwanted hair growth and infertility. PCOS should not be confused with the incidental finding of polycystic ovaries on an ultrasound scan which occur in about 20% of the female population and usually do not cause any symptoms. The cause of PCOS is not fully understood but is thought to have a genetic component. The small cysts seen in the ovaries do not cause PCOS but are the result of the underlying disturbance of metabolism. Most women with PCOS do not have every symptom and the treatment that a doctor recommends is usually chosen to treat the symptoms that bother the woman. In recent years there has been a lot of interest in the use of Metformin to treat the symptoms of PCOS. This information sheet aims to answer many of the questions that women have about this treatment. What is Metformin? Metformin is a medicine that is taken by mouth. It is from a family of drugs known as biguanides and was developed to treat type 2 (late onset) diabetes. Why is it used to treat PCOS? There are a number of similarities between PCOS and adult-onset diabetes. In both conditions, people have a resistance to the effects of insulin with resulting high levels of insulin in their blood stream. These high insulin levels cause an increased production of androgens (male-type hormones that can cause acne and unwanted hair growth) in the ovaries and adrenal glands. This in turn affects the pituitary hormones (LH and FSH) that normally stimulate the ovaries to produce eggs. The result is often irregular infertile periods. Metformin increases the effectiveness of insulin, resulting in a lowering of blood insulin levels which in turn lowers the androg Continue reading >>

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