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Can I Take Metformin While On My Period

I'm Taking Metformin, And Haven't Got My Period Yet!!!

I'm Taking Metformin, And Haven't Got My Period Yet!!!

I'm taking Metformin, and haven't got my period yet!!! Hello all, About a month ago, My obgyn doc told me i have pcos and thats why i couldn't get pregnant before. My obgyn doc gave me Metformin 500mg and take it twice a day. So i get 1000mg's a day. I'm 25 year's old and i've maybe had 15 period's. And my last one was alittle over a year ago. I've always told myself i would have 3 kids by time i'm 25 year's old :'( . Well that time is here and i have no kid's. I've always tryed. But with no period, it's not going to happen. If there is anyone out there that can answer my question. It would be so great. Well my question is, I haven't gottin my period yet, can i still get pregnant since i'm taking Metformin? Please someone answer me???? i WAS TRYING TO GET PREG FOR 13 YRS OR MORE AND MY DOC PUT ME ON METFORMIN AND BIRTH CONTROL. i SAY IN LIKE 4-5 MONTHS I STOP TAKING THE BC AND GOT PREGNANT. I USE TO BE VERY IRREGULAR AND DIDNT THINK I COULD GET PREG BCUZ OF NO PERIOD. ONCE U GET UR PERIOD TOGETHER AND REGULAR BY TAKIN BC AND METFORMIN 4 BOUT 5 MONTHS THEN STP TAKIN DA BC. U WILL GET PREG. WHEN HAVIN INTERCOURSE LAY BCK AND PUT A PILLOW UNDER UR HIPS 4 BOUT 10-15 MINS EVERY TIME Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin On Body Mass Index, Menstrual Cyclicity, And Ovulation Induction In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

Effects Of Metformin On Body Mass Index, Menstrual Cyclicity, And Ovulation Induction In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

Effects of metformin on body mass index, menstrual cyclicity, and ovulation induction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 75235, USA. Metformin has been used as a treatment in many studies of the infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We will review the literature on this topic as it specifically relates to changes in body mass index (BMI), improvement in menstrual cyclicity, and effects on ovulation and pregnancy rates. Review of studies addressing biochemical and clinical changes in women with PCOS on metformin. Changes in BMI, menstrual cyclicity, ovulation rate, and pregnancy rate. Metformin has been shown to produce small but significant reductions in BMI. Multiple observational studies have confirmed an improvement in menstrual cyclicity with metformin therapy. The studies addressing the concomitant use of metformin with clomiphene citrate initially predicted great success, but these have been followed by more modest results. There is little data in the literature concerning the use of metformin and hMGs. Some (but not all) women with PCOS have improvements in their menstrual cycles while on metformin. The data supporting the use of metformin in ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate and hMG remain to be confirmed by large, randomized, prospective studies. Continue reading >>

Periods While Taking Metformin?

Periods While Taking Metformin?

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. This is my first month of being on Metformin, and I before that I was having abnormal periods (somewhere between 40 - 50 day cycles). We are TTC, and in the past the doctor has prescribed me Provera to induce my period, but mentioned that the Metformin might make it happen on it's own. Does that really happen? I am currently on CD 29 - Not sure how long I should hold off waiting on AF to appear. hmm, I would of thought you would of had AF by now, as I started Met 10 days ago and my AF arrived today. Firstly I have fairly regular periods when not on Met, so we are different in that. But before my first pregnancy I was on Met for years and always had 30-33 day cycles. So it definitely might be possible that you will still have slightly longer cycles. CD29 is not super late yet Also I just read the Met FAQ - its a sticky up at the top of the Met thread - and it said that 50% of women take up to 6 months to have Met regulate their cycles. So I think it doesn't always happen right away for some women. I might wait until like CD35 and if you have nothing call the doc. TTC #1 4/2008, BFP 1/26/09, Isaac was born 10/10/09 Hidden Content TTC#2 3/2011, BFP 6/22/12 from IUI #1 with Metformin 1500mg, Femara 2.5mg, Cora was born on 2/9/13 Trying to lose weight and get healthy! 50 mg Spironalactone, Yasmin Hi. So ive always had really regular periods have not been diagnosed with PCOS but was having trouble conceiving so my Dr. did a 20 day progesterone test and it showed i didnt ovulate so he put me on met. Ive been on for a Continue reading >>

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

Have you been prescribed metformin for PCOS and are wondering what the side affects are? Metformin is often described as a ‘safe’ drug, but read on to find out why this might not be the case. When I was diagnosed with PCOS, the first thing I asked my GP was what I could take to ‘fix’ it. She gently explained that there was no pill or surgery that could cure my condition. However, there was a drug that could help with the elevated insulin levels caused by it. Metformin, she claimed, was a safe drug with no major side effects that would help with insulin resistance and weight loss. Sign me up. At first, I thought metformin was the wonder drug. I lost about 5kg in 4 months, more than I had ever been able to lose previously. I was ecstatic. I had a quick look online to see whether there were any side effects and initially found that diarrhea, loose stools, fatigue, and muscle soreness were commonly experienced. But I thought that it was small price to pay for finally being able to lose some weight. However, when I investigated further I found that that there are some much more sinister side effects of metformin that aren’t so widely publicised. These include: – Depleting our bodies of essential nutrients. – Increasing the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by up to 9 times. – Reducing energy levels by almost 50%. – Killing beneficial gut bacteria. This article is not intended to be a case against metformin for PCOS. There is no doubt that metformin helps to reduce weight, lowers blood glucose levels, and promotes ovulation. My concern is the lack of studies about the safety of long-term use of metformin for PCOS, especially in utero. Drugs can help with the associated symptoms of a disease, but they cannot fix the root cause of it. Metformin i Continue reading >>

Metformin And Almost Constant Bleeding

Metformin And Almost Constant Bleeding

I've been taking metformin for nearly three months to try to sort out very infrequent periods from PCOS, and have now hurtled to the other extreme and have been bleeding to one degree or another (but mostly mediumish spotting) for about 2/3 of the time. I am pretty certain I can discern a longish period, then a week off, then two weeks of this spotting. Obviously the thing to do is talk to my doctor about it, and I will, but would love some advance thoughts of what she might say. Has anyone experienced anything similar? Hi I've not had experience of this yet. I just got put on metformin a month ago, so far my first perido on it was the normal 5 week length I always get. That's got me worried now though. Have you found the metformin helped with other symptoms? I've been on metformin for ages for PCOS. I think I might have had similar issues at the start, but it did calm down. I found it pretty amazing tbh and I was able to regulate cycles enough to be able to pinpoint ovulation and concieve first time of trying (huge suprise when i was told that I'd probably not have kids ever!) I am a slim PCOS-er though- not sure if that makes a differece in how effective it is How are you finding the gastric side effects? I haven't even had the gastric side effects! I was perversely quite looking forward to them as a possible weightloss tactic. In that case I will ask about progesterone, but be prepared to wait a little longer to see if it calms down naturally if my doctor suggests it. pipistrello you do not want the gastric side effects. I've had them right from the first pill. They're horrendous. Agree with A. I was same. I recently reatarted after having dd and it was hellish. I have to build from 1/4 to 2 whole tabs over 6 months or it's like food poisoning nausea and stomach pai Continue reading >>

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Irregular Periods - Management & Treatment

Although some women with PCOS have regular periods, high levels of androgens ('male' hormones) and excess insulin can disrupt the monthly cycle of ovulation and menstruation. If you have PCOS, your periods may be 'irregular' or stop altogether. The average menstrual cycle is 28 days with one ovulation when eggs are released, but anywhere between 21 and 35 days is considered 'normal'. An 'irregular' period cycle is defined as either: Eight or less menstrual cycles per year Menstrual cycles longer than 35 days Some women with PCOS also experience heavier or lighter bleeding during their menstrual cycle. Regular periods help to prevent excess thickening of the lining of the uterus (womb). Long gaps between periods can lead to abnormal cells building up inside the womb. It is important you have at least four cycles per year to avoid a build up that may include abnormal cells. Treatment options Hormonal contraception Your doctor can prescribe hormonal contraception to help regulate your menstrual periods. The medication can also reduce menstrual cramps, acne and excess hair growth. These medications include: A low–dose oral contraceptive pill ('the pill') Progesterone which stimulates the uterus and induces bleeding Hormonal implants Vaginal contraceptive rings Intra-uterine devices containing progesterone How they work The oestrogen and progesterone in hormonal contraception act to override the body's normal hormonal control of the menstrual cycle and ovulation. The oral contraceptive pill works by "switching the ovaries off", which means that when a woman is taking the pill the production of hormones such as testosterone is greatly reduced. The pill also increases the body's production of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), which binds to the main androgen testosterone Continue reading >>

The Low Down On Metformin And Vitamin B12 Deficiency

The Low Down On Metformin And Vitamin B12 Deficiency

So many women with PCOS are prescribed Metformin (an insulin-sensitizing drug) to manage their Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. And for good reason too. Metformin has been shown to improve many aspects of PCOS, including weight loss, fertility and improved testosterone levels (1). But, it also leads to Vitamin B12 deficiency if used at high doses or for long periods of time. So, here’s what you need to know about Metformin and Vitamin B12 deficiency with PCOS. What is Metformin? As I have already mentioned, Metformin is an insulin sensitizing drug that is often prescribed for women withPCOS. It works by decreasing absorption of glucose through the intestines, lowering the amount of glucose produced by the liver and making the body more sensitive to the insulin that is being produced. The overall effect of Metformin use for PCOS is lowered testosterone levels, improved ovulation and fertility as well as a more regular menstrual cycle. This is all sounding good, right? Well, it is good although there are some nasty side effects. A full discussion on Metformin is not going to be dealt with now, though. I really want to hone in on Metformin’s effect of Vitamin B12 levels as this could be affecting you right now. A free 6 lesson course that has helped women with PCOS around the world learn how to see lasting changes in their PCOS symptoms. Ready to join? Vitamin B12 Vitamin B12 is a vitamin that is vital for the body’s functioning. It is important for red blood cell formation, neurological function and DNA formation. If you are deficient in this important vitamin, it could lead to anaemia and neurological problems. (including memory loss – something that I have seen cropping up more often in PCOS communities). (2) Metformin and Vitamin B12 Right, so this is where it gets Continue reading >>

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

10 Facts About Metformin And Pcos

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a relatively common hormonal disorder that is one of the leading causes of infertility. Some women who have PCOS develop insulin resistance. This occurs when the cells of the body don’t respond well to a hormone known as insulin. Insulin allows the cells to take sugar (glucose) from the blood. If the cells don’t take in this sugar it leads to higher levels of glucose and insulin circulating through the body in the bloodstream. This, in turn, leads to increased levels of androgens (male hormones) which cause the classic symptoms of PCOS such as excess hair growth and more importantly in terms of fertility – lack of ovulation. Getting pregnant with PCOS can be possible with the right diagnosis and treatment plan. Here are the Top 10 facts about metformin use in PCOS patients: 1) Metformin is a medication that is primarily used to treat type 2 diabetes. It is marketed in the US under the names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza and Riomet. It is available as a tablet, extended-release tablet and a liquid. 2) With infertility patients, it is used not because the women with PCOS have diabetes (although they do have an increased risk of developing this disease), but because it acts on improving use of insulin by the cells of the body and therefore reducing the level of insulin in the blood. This can lead to improved ovulation, more regular menstrual cycles as well as a reduction in excessive hair growth, acne and weight gain. It may also slow down or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes later in life. 3) To determine if it would be helpful for a patient with PCOS to use Metformin, they are given a 2 Hour Glucose Tolerance Test. First, a fasting blood sample is drawn to determine a baseline glucose level. The patient t Continue reading >>

Can I Have Metformin Hcl When I Am Having Menstruation Period Time ( In That 5 Days)?

Can I Have Metformin Hcl When I Am Having Menstruation Period Time ( In That 5 Days)?

Home Q & A Questions Can I have metformin hcl when... Can I have metformin hcl when I am having menstruation period time ( in that 5 days)? Yes, you can. Unless your doctor has indicated otherwise. There is no contraindication of using metformin during your periods. Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question . Glucophage - Is there a big differance between Metformin hcl & Metformin er? would it be harmful if? Hairy Cell Leukemia - I have HCL. Does anyone have pain in the middle of the back? I also feel? The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. Available for Android and iOS devices. Subscribe to receive email notifications whenever new articles are published. Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include Micromedex (updated Feb 28th, 2018), Cerner Multum (updated Mar 1st, 2018), Wolters Kluwer (updated Mar 1st, 2018) and others. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy . Continue reading >>

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Metformin For The Treatment Of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder of body metabolism that affects 5-10% of women and can cause infrequent periods, weight gain, acne, unwanted hair growth and infertility. PCOS should not be confused with the incidental finding of polycystic ovaries on an ultrasound scan which occur in about 20% of the female population and usually do not cause any symptoms. The cause of PCOS is not fully understood but is thought to have a genetic component. The small cysts seen in the ovaries do not cause PCOS but are the result of the underlying disturbance of metabolism. Most women with PCOS do not have every symptom and the treatment that a doctor recommends is usually chosen to treat the symptoms that bother the woman. In recent years there has been a lot of interest in the use of Metformin to treat the symptoms of PCOS. This information sheet aims to answer many of the questions that women have about this treatment. What is Metformin? Metformin is a medicine that is taken by mouth. It is from a family of drugs known as biguanides and was developed to treat type 2 (late onset) diabetes. Why is it used to treat PCOS? There are a number of similarities between PCOS and adult-onset diabetes. In both conditions, people have a resistance to the effects of insulin with resulting high levels of insulin in their blood stream. These high insulin levels cause an increased production of androgens (male-type hormones that can cause acne and unwanted hair growth) in the ovaries and adrenal glands. This in turn affects the pituitary hormones (LH and FSH) that normally stimulate the ovaries to produce eggs. The result is often irregular infertile periods. Metformin increases the effectiveness of insulin, resulting in a lowering of blood insulin levels which in turn lowers the androg Continue reading >>

Pcos: All Guides

Pcos: All Guides

PCOS is a common problem among teen girls and young women. In fact, almost 1 out of 10 women has PCOS. What is PCOS? Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormone imbalance that can cause irregular periods, unwanted hair growth, and acne. PCOS begins during a girl’s teen years and can be mild or severe. What are the signs of PCOS? Some of the most common signs of PCOS include: Irregular periods that come every few months, not at all, or too frequently Extra hair on your face or other parts of your body, called hirsutism (her-suit-is-em) Acne Weight gain and/or trouble losing weight Patches of dark skin on the back of your neck and other areas, called acanthosis nigricans (a-can-tho-sis ni-gri-cans) Could I have PCOS? If you have some or all of the above signs, you might have PCOS. There can be other reasons why you might have signs; however, only your health care provider can tell for sure. What causes PCOS? PCOS is caused by an imbalance in the hormones (chemical messengers) in your brain and your ovaries. PCOS usually happens when a hormone called LH (from the pituitary gland) or levels of insulin (from the pancreas) are too high, which then causes the ovaries to make extra amounts of testosterone. For a more detailed explanation, take a look at the female reproductive anatomy image: The pituitary (pi-tu-i-tary) gland in your brain makes the hormones luteinizing (lu-tin-iz-ing) hormone (LH) and follicle (fall-i-call) stimulating hormone (FSH). After getting the signal from the hormones LH and FSH, the ovaries make estrogen (es-tro-gen) and progesterone (pro-ges-ter-own), the female sex hormones. All normal ovaries also make a little bit of the androgen testosterone (an-dro-gen tes-tos-ter-own), a male sex hormone. The pancreas (pang-cree-us) is an organ that makes i Continue reading >>

Can We Use Metformin During Periods 135941

Can We Use Metformin During Periods 135941

Effects of metformin on body mass index,OBJECTIVE: Metformin has been used as a treatment in many studies of the infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We will review theIs it safe to use metformin during pregnancy? Medical12 May 2017 Effects of metformin use during and after pregnancy PCOS can cause missed periods and infrequent ovulation, which may lead to infertility orWill Metformin regulate my cycle?? Diabetes26 buy viagra Sep 2010 My mom told me that metformin will regulate my menstrual cycle. Psych meds can be a real B!#ch, and since most PCOS is marked by insulin I'm totally with youI absolutely refuse to take BC because my cycles are . The Role of Language in Diabetes Care (or How to Talk to People With Diabetes)10 Facts About Metformin and PCOS InVia Fertility19 Jun 2017 Many PCOS patients take metformin to help with fertility treatment. This can lead to improved ovulation, more regular menstrual cycles as well as a reduction in reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. . Should We Only Transfer Frozen Embryos?Early Effects of Metformin in Women with Polycystic OvaryContext: Metformin is successfully used in the treatment of cycle disorders and anovulation in Facultatively patients could have clinical and/or biochemical signs of Every 4 wk during the 3-month study period, the baseline clinical, metabolic (including We were able to analyze complete data from 38 of the 45 women.Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Treatment with Metformin,Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is often treated with Metformin (Glucophage) an oral drug that We give personalized attention to every patient, How Metformin Is Used for Polycystic Ovaries If the metformin does not result in ovulation and regular periods, the next st Continue reading >>

How Long Before Your Periods Were Normal After Metformin?

How Long Before Your Periods Were Normal After Metformin?

how long before your periods were normal after metformin? how long before your periods were normal after metformin? for anyone who has been on metformin before because of pcos, how long were you on it before your periods became regular? i've been on it for the last 10 days and i was wondering if this cycle will be normal? will af come on time (meaning less than 35 days since the last one) or will it take a while for my body to adjust? Re: how long before your periods were normal after metformin? For me I started on it in mid May and didn't get my first period until mid July. But I think it really depends on how often you were getting your period before starting it. I hadn't had a period in almost a year before that. Re: how long before your periods were normal after metformin? thanks for replying. have you ever been successful in conceiving while on metformin? Re: how long before your periods were normal after metformin? I have not had success however I haven't been able to stay on it longer than a couple of months at a time. It would give me such awful diarrehea, sorry, and they would say that it'ld eventually go away like after a week or two. Mine never did, I was to the point where taking anti-diarreheals weren't helping at all. I was then put on a medication to counter act it but that just make me so tired. So for about 2 weeks I was a walking zombie that sat on the toilet or slept all day everyday. It wasn't a pleasent experience for me at all. I have since stopped the use of metformin and do not plan on ever getting back on it again. I figure I'ld rather never have kids of my own blood than kill myself with dehydration and starvation. I don't mean to scare you, everyone I have talked to has had no major problems taking it at all, some got pregnant in a month or t Continue reading >>

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Here at Flo Living headquarters I speak with many women suffering with PCOS who have either been offered Metformin and decided against it or have tried Metformin and it’s not worked for them. If you have a diagnosis of PCOS it’s very likely that at some point your doctor has suggested Metformin. I personally was what would be considered the “perfect” candidate for this treatment when I was in my 20s and suffering with PCOS – overweight, struggling with acne and a complete lack of periods. However, I never tried it myself – instead I created a protocol for myself that became Flo Living. I’ve since helped many women manage their PCOS successfully with this protocol, just as I did my own diagnosis. That said, I speak with women so often about the Metformin option that I want to share my perspective with you. Although I do not dismiss the option completely, I do have some caveats and concerns. What is Metformin? Metformin is a first-line medication for those suffering with type 2 diabetes. It is also presented as a treatment for PCOS sufferers who are also overweight or obese. Not all PCOS sufferers have weight gain as a symptom, it depends on the kind of PCOS. Women with the kind of PCOS that causes weight gain are usually insulin resistant. Metformin reduces overall insulin levels. Insulin resistance is when the cells of your body become resistant to the hormone insulin, preventing glucose from entering your cells to be used for energy, and instead causing soaring levels of sugar blood stream bringing about diabetes, pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant PCOS. The connection between insulin and PCOS is blood sugar regulation. We hear about this most commonly with diabetes, but it’s also very important with PCOS. An unstable, constantly spiking and crashing, bl Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Problems that might arise and ways to troubleshoot I have always had pretty strong side effects (lots of nausea and always very tired) while taking metformin. It does get better as time goes on but working myself up to the maximum dosage has always been hard. Ive been to a number of different doctors who have all suggested different ways to work up to my maximum dosage (1500 mg). It is generally suggested that you start with the lowest dose and keep increasing it as you get used to it (or as the side effects start to go away). The first time I took it, I took 500 mg for about three weeks (1 pill in the morning). Then added a second pill at lunch time (so I took 1000 mg for 3 weeks). And, then I added a third pill at dinner time. The second time that I took metformin, I increased the dosage from 500 mg to 1500 mg over the course of three weeks. I was sick a lot but I feel like I got the worst part over with faster. My personal experience has been that it usually takes me about 1 month for the side effects to start to lessen. I will still have bouts of nausea, but after about 2 months that starts to happen less often. Always take with food or a glass of milk I always take my metformin when I am eating either breakfast, lunch or dinner. I have heard from others that following a low carb diet helps with the side effects (I personally havent found this to be true or maybe I just couldnt follow the low carb life). When increasing your dosage, just increase it as you feel ready. Continue reading >>

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