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Can I Take Glipizide With Lantus

Increased Mortality With Combining Sulfonylurea And Insulin

Increased Mortality With Combining Sulfonylurea And Insulin

About 11,000 patients using both insulin and sulfonylurea were evaluated… Ulrik M. Mogensen, MD, of the department of cardiology at University Hospital Rigshospitalet in Denmark, and colleagues evaluated patients receiving sulfonylurea with insulin and 16,910 patients receiving metformin with insulin to determine the differences in outcomes of treatment combinations. Outcome endpoints measured included all-cause mortality, cardiovascular death, hypoglycemia and a composite endpoint of myocardial infarction, stroke and CV death. The metformin plus insulin group was younger, had experienced less comorbidity and a longer duration of monotherapy treatment, and used metformin more often before insulin therapy vs. the sulfonylurea plus insulin group. There was a two to five times greater risk for mortality among the sulfonylurea group compared with the metformin group. Glibenclamide, tolbutamide and glipizide plus insulin led to the greatest odds of all outcome endpoints compared with metformin plus insulin. Compared with metformin plus insulin, there was an increased risk for mortality among all sulfonylurea plus insulin combinations. When using glimepiride plus insulin as a reference, researchers found no significant differences of mortality for combinations of insulin plus glibenclamide, gliclazide, glipizide and tolbutamide. Increased mortality (RR=1.7; 95% CI, 1.48-1.95), CV death (RR=1.35; 95% CI, 1.07-1.7) and the combined endpoint (RR=1.25; 95% CI, 1.05-1.49) were all associated with the use of sulfonylurea plus insulin. One percent of patients had been hospitalized with hypoglycemia at baseline. During follow-up, 3.5% were hospitalized with hypoglycemia; 85% once, 10.6% twice, 3.4% three times and 3% more than three times. Compared with the sulfonylurea plus insuli Continue reading >>

Compare Glucotrol Vs Lantus - Iodine.com

Compare Glucotrol Vs Lantus - Iodine.com

Head-to-head comparisons of medication uses, side effects, ratings, and more. Glucotrol (glipizide) is an effective medicine for lowering blood sugar, but it can cause your blood sugar level to be too low so you must always carry some form of sugar with you that can be readily used. 3.2/ 5 average rating with 332 reviewsforGlucotrol Lantus (insulin glargine) is an effective, long-acting insulin that provides all-day blood sugar control, but it can cause low blood sugar levels, so be sure to have a source of sugar nearby. 3.7/ 5 average rating with 584 reviewsforLantus Glucotrol (glipizide) is an oral medicine so it might be a good alternative for those who don't like injections. Protects your organs and blood vessels by preventing the harmful effects of high blood sugar levels. Okay to use by people with kidney problems. Available as a generic form and is relatively cheap. Insulin is one of the most effective blood sugar-lowering medication and can lower your A1c (average blood sugar over time) by up to 2-3%. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-lasting insulin that provides consistent, all-day sugar control with just once or twice daily dosing. Dose can be easily adjusted to make a customized regimen that's tailored to your body's needs. Lantus (insulin glargine) can be used with liver or kidney problems. Has a higher risk than other diabetes medicine for causing blood sugar levels to be too low. While taking Glucotrol (glipizide), your blood sugars should be checked 2 to 5 times a week, but less often once you are on a stable dose. Needs to be taken 30 minutes before a meal for it to be most effective. You have to check your blood sugar regularly to assure your medications are working. You may gain some weight, around 4-6 pounds. You have to maintain a consistent sche Continue reading >>

Glipizide / Metformin And Lantus Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Glipizide / Metformin And Lantus Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences. Continue reading >>

Compare Glipizide To Lantus Insulin To Vetsulin Insulin

Compare Glipizide To Lantus Insulin To Vetsulin Insulin

Compare Glipizide to Lantus Insulin to Vetsulin Insulin Normalizes blood sugar levels in cats with type II diabetes Highly effective when combined with low-carbohydrate diet Controls your dogs glucose levels and alleviates symptoms of diabetes Improvement can usually be seen within a few days First and only FDA-approved dog insulin available in the US Our expert panel consists of licensed veterinarians and the knowledgeable staff of PetMed Express, Inc. d/b/a 1-800-PetMeds. Neither the Company nor any of its employees or consultants make any warranties, expressed or implied, or representations about the accuracy or completeness of the content or the content of any site or external sites. Likewise, no legal liability or responsibility is assumed for the accuracy or completeness of any information, or usefulness of products discussed. While every effort has been made to accurately represent the qualities and characteristics of each product, which for the most part were taken directly from the websites of the manufacturers, we are not responsible for any errors. The information presented is for educational purposes only and is intended to be a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise and professional judgment of your veterinarian. The information is NOT to be used for diagnosis or treatment of your pet. You should always consult your own veterinarian for specific advice concerning the treatment of your pet. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, allergic reactions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for your pet. It is not a substitute for a veterinary exam, and it does not replace the need for serv Continue reading >>

Combined Therapy With Insulin Plus Oral Agents: Is There Any Advantage?

Combined Therapy With Insulin Plus Oral Agents: Is There Any Advantage?

Physicians in many countries use combinations of antihyperglycemic agents to achieve the best glycemic control possible under the conditions faced by individual patients with type 2 diabetes. This widespread use of combined therapies, including oral agents combined with insulin, suggests that the diabetes community accepts the value of this tactic. A routine need for combined therapies was explicitly acknowledged by the investigators in the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study. Review of the results of 9 years of monotherapy with various agents in the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study found that fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was kept below 7.8 mmol/l (140 mg/dl) in only 18% of participants using metformin, 24% using a sulfonylurea, and 42% using insulin (1). Corresponding values for keeping A1C below 7% were 13% with metformin, 24% with a sulfonylurea, and 28% with insulin. Regardless of which agent was used as initial therapy, a progressive worsening of glycemic control ensued, largely because of a gradual decline of endogenous insulin production. A substudy embedded in the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study compared early addition of basal insulin to a sulfonylurea with insulin alone and showed that over 6 years of treatment the combined regimen achieved lower median A1C (6.6 vs. 7.1%) and also less major hypoglycemia (1.6 vs. 3.2% annually) (2). The U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study investigators concluded that “the majority of patients need multiple therapies to attain these glycemic targets in the longer term” (1). However, combined therapy with oral agents and insulin has not been accepted as desirable by all experts. This article describes an argument in favor of combined therapy in a recent debate examining the advantages and limitations of this approach. Because reports Continue reading >>

"lantus And Glucotrol": Diabetes Community - Support Group

Lantus is a long-acting basal (background) insulin that is normally used to "stabilize" your blood sugar levels. It does not lower them rapidly. Only a bolus (mealtime) insulin will do that. Glucotrol (glipizide) is a sulfonylurea drug and stimulates the pancreas (beta cells) to increase its secretion of insulin. However, depending upon how much beta cell function you have left, your results are going to vary initially until you are able to adjust timing, dosage, and diet for optimum results. It is important to follow your doctor's instructions precisely, test your blood glucose levels frequently, eliminate starches and sugars (and lots of other "no-no" foods) from your diet, keep a log or written record of the results, and evaluate everything with your physician at your next appointment. It is not possible to accurately predict how much or how soon your blood sugars will go down since these medications (including the Lantus) are new to your body. DO, however, establish a goal or timetable in consultation with your doctor so that if you do not achieve desired levels within that period, reevaluating your dosages or switching to other meds may be required. glucerna replied to nutrijoy 's response: Vicki, you mentioned 45 grams of carbohydrate per meal, and then later that you're not eating more than 45 grams of carbohydrate for the entire day. I really like nutrijoy's suggestion to set goals with your physician and/or diabetes educator so you know where you want your blood sugar levels to be, and how long it might take to get there. Often insulin is started at a low dose and then titrated up if necessary to achieve the desired blood sugar levels. ~Lynn @Glucerna Vikki, many diabetics can control their diabetes with both insulin and oral meds. Many do do both. That being Continue reading >>

Initiation Of Insulin Therapy In Older Adults

Initiation Of Insulin Therapy In Older Adults

How to Initiate Insulin Therapy in Older Adults The patient described above checks his glucose readings twice a day. His fasting glucose is in the range of 11.1-16.6 mmol/L (200-300 mg/dL), and his daytime glucose is in the range of 5.5-11.1 mmol/L (100-200 mg/dL). What is the optimal choice of therapy at this point: (1) continue glipizide and add basal insulin at bedtime; (2) inject basal insulin in the morning; (3) use premixed insulin twice daily with breakfast and supper; or (4) use a combined basal and prandial insulin regimen? Should Glipizide Be Continued and Basal Insulin Be Added at Bedtime? A starting dose of intermediate-acting insulin (neutral protamine Hagedorn [NPH] or detemir) or the long-acting insulin glargine at 0.2 U/kg or 10-15 U at bedtime is a reasonable first step for patients with fasting hyperglycemia.[ 7 , 23 ] The dose is subsequently increased by 1-2 U if fasting blood glucose is not at target on 3 consecutive days. Although a target fasting glucose of 5-6.6 mmol/L (90-120 mg/dL) is reasonable for an older person, this should be individualized depending on the risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia, hypoglycemia unawareness, other comorbidities, and the living situation. If hypoglycemia occurs, or the fasting glucose is below the individualized target range, the bedtime dose should be reduced by 4 U or 10%, whichever is greater. The challenge of starting basal insulin at bedtime is nocturnal hypoglycemia, which is more common among those with type 2 diabetes treated with NPH compared with insulin glargine (28.8% vs. 12.6%, respectively; p = .011).[ 24 , 25 ] Should Basal Insulin Be Injected in the Morning? With fasting hyperglycemia, basal insulin in the morning would not be a first treatment option. However, it is a good option for individuals with Continue reading >>

Glipizide And Lantus Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Glipizide And Lantus Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Getting Started When most people find out they have Type 2 diabetes, they are first instructed to make changes in their diet and lifestyle. These changes, which are likely to include routine exercise, more nutritious food choices, and often a lower calorie intake, are crucial to managing diabetes and may successfully lower blood glucose levels to an acceptable level. If they do not, a drug such as glyburide, glipizide, or metformin is often prescribed. But lifestyle changes and oral drugs for Type 2 diabetes are unlikely to be permanent solutions. This is because over time, the pancreas tends to produce less and less insulin until eventually it cannot meet the body’s needs. Ultimately, insulin (injected or infused) is the most effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes. There are many barriers to starting insulin therapy: Often they are psychological; sometimes they are physical or financial. But if insulin is begun early enough and is used appropriately, people who use it have a marked decrease in complications related to diabetes such as retinopathy (a diabetic eye disease), nephropathy (diabetic kidney disease), and neuropathy (nerve damage). The need for insulin should not be viewed as a personal failure, but rather as a largely inevitable part of the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. This article offers some practical guidance on starting insulin for people with Type 2 diabetes. When to start insulin Insulin is usually started when oral medicines (usually no more than two) and lifestyle changes (which should be maintained for life even if oral pills or insulin are later prescribed) have failed to lower a person’s HbA1c level to less than 7%. (HbA1c stands for glycosylated hemoglobin and is a measure of blood glucose control.) However, a recent consensus statement from Continue reading >>

Can Januvia And Glipizide Be Taken Together Safely?

Can Januvia And Glipizide Be Taken Together Safely?

Community Answers No, The two drugs are virtually identical. If both of the drugs are taken together may potentiate the risk of hypoglycemia. Yes Januvia can be taken with any other medication for Type 2 diabetes. There are studies in the prescribing information of januvia used in combination with glipizide, metformin, insulin. There are no contraindications to take the two products together, however, it is recommended to closely monitor patients hypoglycemia when januvia is used together with any sulfolyurea like glipizide. I take glipizide, metformin at their max dose and januvia (a newbie med). My diabetes is still out of control. my weight does not change. I eat no refined sugars. In the last 18 months my digestion has changed so dramatically that I can eat nothing but bland foods (mostly cereals). Know more here READ THESE NEXT: Can a new diabetes drug also help my mother lose weight? Essential Info About Type 2 Diabetes Drugs When Blood Sugar High Continue reading >>

Addition Of Basal Insulin To Oral Antidiabetic Agents: A Goal-directed Approach To Type 2 Diabetes Therapy

Addition Of Basal Insulin To Oral Antidiabetic Agents: A Goal-directed Approach To Type 2 Diabetes Therapy

Go to: Introduction Despite the well-documented consequences of long-term uncontrolled hyperglycemia, the majority of patients with type 2 diabetes are not achieving the degree of glycemic control recommended by currently accepted guidelines. The 2006 American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendations for glycemic control are listed as a glycosylated hemoglobin A1C (A1C) level < 7.0% and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels of 90–130 mg/dL (5.0–7.2 mmol/L), or as close to physiologic levels as possible without unacceptable hypoglycemia.[1] The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) has an even more stringent recommendation for an A1C level of ≤ 6.5%.[2] Despite this expert guidance, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey demonstrated that only 37% of adults with diabetes in the United States are achieving target A1C levels.[3] When diet and exercise fail to provide adequate glucose control in type 2 diabetes, oral antidiabetic agents are usually prescribed as initial therapy. Although many patients initially attain control, over the long term there is generally a requirement for intensified and multidrug regimens; ultimately, oral agents alone cannot maintain satisfactory control in many individuals and therapy must be augmented by the addition of insulin. Indeed, newly diagnosed individuals with A1C levels > 10.0% are not likely to achieve goals on oral therapy alone and insulin therapy should be initiated.[2] Normal pancreatic insulin secretion comprises 2 components: (1) a constant low level of secretion (basal secretion) to suppress glucose production between meals and overnight, and (2) spikes of higher-level secretion in response to rising glucose levels after meals (postprandial secretion). Therapy with basal insulin is a str Continue reading >>

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

5 Things Everyone Taking Diabetes Medications Should Do

Diabetes can definitely be a challenging condition to manage, especially when it comes to medications. If you are diabetic, there are five key things you need to do to get the most health benefits from your prescriptions. Guest post by: Mike Shelley Fourth Year Pharmacy Student Northeast Ohio Medical University As I approach the start of my career as a pharmacist at a community pharmacy, I look forward to the opportunity to help people understand and use their medications as wisely as possible. If you or someone you love is diabetic, I’d like to offer these tips, guidelines and recommendations for managing this condition. #1 — Keep a list of your medications with you. Keeping track of your medications can be a difficult task. Making a list is a great way to help you remember which medications you are taking and how you take them. Here are some things you should include for each medication on your list: Medication name (brand and/or generic) Medication strength Directions Prescriber For example, you might write down: Metformin (Glucophage) 500 mg, 1 tablet twice a day, Dr. Smith; or Lantus insulin, inject 30 units daily at bedtime, Dr. Wheeler. You may also want to add your emergency contact information, as well as the pharmacies you go to in case of an emergency. Also, make sure you update your list as changes are made to your medications! #2 — Be familiar with the medications you take. There are many medication options available to help lower your blood sugar; your doctor decides which medications are best for you based on your lifestyle, physical condition, how you respond to medications, and insurance coverage. Below are examples of each class of oral anti-diabetes medications and generic and brand names of each. Medication Class Medications Sulfonylureas Chlor Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Medications

Diabetes Management Medications

DIABETES MANAGEMENT MEDICATIONS Annette Hess, PhD, FNP-BC, CNS University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Diabetes • 25.8 million children and adults (8.3% of the population) have diabetes in the U.S. • Disproportionately affects older people – prevalence is higher among racial and ethnic minority populations • Annual economic burden of diabetes is estimated to be $174 billion – $116 billion for direct medical costs – $58 billion for indirect costs (disability, work loss, premature mortality) Diabetic Retinopathy Leading cause of blindness in adults Diabetic Nephropathy Major cause of kidney failure Cardiovascular Disease Stroke Diabetic Neuropathy Major cause of lower extremity amputations CV Disease & Stroke account for ~65% of deaths in T2D patients Type 2 Diabetes Associated with Serious Complications CV = cardiovascular. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. National Diabetes Statistics fact sheet: general information and national estimates on diabetes in the United States, 2005. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Health, 2005. Background: Management • Management of hyperglycemia – Crucial – Improved macrovascular & microvascular outcomes • Controlling blood glucose levels – Nutritional therapy – MODERATION!! – Weight loss, if needed – Increased physical activity – Antidiabetes medications Source: 2007–2009 National Health Interview Survey. Targets for Diabetes Control Biochemical Index ADA Goal ACE Goal A1C < 7% < 6.5% Preprandial Glucose 90-130 mg/dl <110 mg/dl Peak Postprandial Glucose <180 mg/dl ----- 2 Hour Postprandial Glucose --- <140 mg/dl Breakdown of Treatments for Continue reading >>

Glipizide And Lantus Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Glipizide And Lantus Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Glipizide and Lantus drug interactions - from FDA reports Drug interactions are reported among people who take Glipizide and Lantus together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Glipizide and Lantus. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 3,086 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 3,086 people who take Glipizide, Lantus are studied. Most common drug interactions over time *: Ecchymosis (a discoloration of the skin resulting from bleeding underneath) Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration) Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle) Acute myocardial infarction (acute heart attack) Gastrointestinal haemorrhage (bleeding gastrointestinal tract) Hepatic cirrhosis (chronic liver disease characterized by replacement of liver tissue by fibrosis, scar tissue) Hepatic fibrosis (scarring process that represents the liver's response to injury) Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration) Most common drug interactions by gender *: Dyspnoea (difficult or laboured respiration) Nausea (feeling of having an urge to vomit) Myocardial infarction (destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle) Pancreatitis acute (sudden inflammation of pancreas) Small for dates baby (an unborn baby is growing more slowly and is smaller than most babies are at the same age) Acute psychosis (period of mentally unstable behaviour) Agitation (state of Continue reading >>

Compare Glipizide Vs Lantus - Comprehensive Analysis By Treato

Compare Glipizide Vs Lantus - Comprehensive Analysis By Treato

Diabetes Cancer COPD Alzheimer's Hepatitis C Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

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