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Can I Stop Insulin Injection

Guys If I Stop Insulin What Will Happen ????? Or Should I Re

Guys If I Stop Insulin What Will Happen ????? Or Should I Re

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Guys if i stop insulin what will happen ????? Or should i re Guys i think my insulin is making me sick so giys if i stop insulin what will happen because from tommorow i am stopping my insulin .... Guys i need input pls help me and advice me ...... Do u think my sugar level will go up .... Actually i want to set my insulin levels again .... So i am stopping it or should i reduce it to good level ..... I really dont know i think too much insulin in my body making me sick !!!!!! Newly daignosed , novomix 30 , 21units in morning and 17 at night , have issues in eating and sleeping pls help me , why my morning BS is always high ???? Late night eating is the problem , so please help me guys Re: Guys if i stop insulin what will happen ????? Or should Sameer, I think you need to talk to a doctor. It appears you're struggling at present but your doctor can advise you better than we can ! Good luck ! Re: Guys if i stop insulin what will happen ????? Or should There is a reason why your doctor prescribed insulin for you to use. It is because your blood sugar levels went very high and you were in danger of dying. Do you not think it is a bit silly of you to contemplate stopping it? What do you think will happen to you if you stop? If you are having hypo feelings, its either because you are not eating enough carbohydrate at set meal times or if you are eating correctly, maybe the insulin doseage needs to adjusted. What you must not do if you want to live, is stop insulin. Re: Guys if i stop insulin what will happen ????? Or should I really dont know , yes i want to lower my dose What is that i am having brain fog !!! Difficulty in concentration pla guide !!! Newl Continue reading >>

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Most people associate taking insulin with type 1 diabetes. However, some people with type 2 diabetes also need to take insulin. We talked with Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, Joslin Diabetes Center, to find out the truth about insulin and type 2 diabetes. Why would someone with type 2 diabetes who has been controlling their diabetes with diet and exercise need to start taking insulin? There are several reasons why someone would require insulin, even if they hadn’t needed it before. Temporary insulin usage– Some people need to take insulin for a short amount of time, because of things like pregnancy, surgery, broken bones, cancer, or steroidal medicines (like Prednisone). Permanent insulin usage - Sometimes the pancreas becomes unable to produce enough insulin. This happens frequently with aging. People can also become insulin resistant due to weight gain or chronic emotional or physical stress. Simply put, pills can no longer control diabetes. So, it’s not usually “bad” behavior that would cause someone to start insulin? Correct. However, non adherence to diet and exercise might result in high blood glucose levels that only insulin can control. Is insulin dosage different for someone who has type 2 rather than type 1? The doses will vary; either type may require very little or a lot of medication. It depends on weight, eating habits, exercise levels, existence of other illnesses and level of insulin resistance. Can someone start taking insulin and then not need to take it anymore? Absolutely! But only for those with type 2 diabetes. Often weight reduction and /or exercise can allow insulin to be stopped. Also, if any of the temporary situations listed above resolve, insulin might be stopped. Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

Managing Diabetes Without Insulin – Is It Possible?

It is widely believed that those with Type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin if they have diabetes for long enough. However, only about 20-30 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes end up needing insulin injections. In this article, we will explore whether it is possible to manage your diabetes without insulin. If so, how can one do so and when they may eventually need insulin if other treatments do not work out? 1 Type 1 Diabetes disclaimer This article is not for people with Type 1 diabetes because it is imperative that people with Type 1 diabetes require insulin every day without question. A person with Type 1 diabetes produces very little, or no insulin. Without insulin, you cannot convert food into usable energy. Simply put, without insulin, a person with Type 1 diabetes cannot survive. 2 When Robert contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, he was concerned that one day he would have to take insulin shots for his Type 2 diabetes. He had heard a few of his friends with diabetes at church talking about how they had to take insulin injections. Robert was “afraid of needles,” and the thought of giving himself a shot scared him. Is Robert going to need to start taking insulin, or is there any way he can avoid it at this point? If he avoids it, what effects would this have on his health? Will he develop long term complications of diabetes if he doesn’t start giving himself shots of insulin? I suggest also reading these: At TheDiabetesCouncil, we decided to take a look at this particular question in depth, for Robert and for others with diabetes who might benefit from reading this information. Insulin isn’t the “bad guy.” Naturally, the fear of giving oneself an injection or “shot,” can increase anxiety and stress. But what if I told you that once you get past t Continue reading >>

Can You Ever Stop Insulin?

Can You Ever Stop Insulin?

Once you begin using insulin to treat type 2 diabetes, can you ever get off it and go back to medications? — Anne, Minnesota For someone to go back to oral diabetes medicines after starting insulin, the pancreas must be able to produce enough insulin to maintain normal sugar levels. That being said, there are several instances in which insulin injections may be stopped. Here are a few: 1. In some individuals who have had untreated or poorly controlled diabetes for several weeks to months, glucose levels are high enough to be directly toxic to the pancreas. This means that the pancreas has not completely lost its ability to produce the critical level of insulin, but it does not work properly as a result of high glucose levels. In this instance, injected insulin can be used for several days or weeks to reduce glucose and help the pancreas to revert back to its usual level of functioning — a level that can control glucose supported by oral medicines. Once this occurs, insulin can be stopped. Remember, oral diabetes medicines work well only if the pancreas can still produce and release insulin. 2. Sometimes insulin is given during an acute illness such as an infection, when glucose levels can be high and the demand for insulin is greater than the pancreas can handle. After the illness is treated adequately, oral medicines can be started again. 3. Many obese individuals with diabetes who require insulin can reduce their dose or control their diabetes by taking oral medicines if they lose weight. However, the choice of insulin to manage diabetes does not always come after exhausting all oral or non-insulin options. Insulin has several advantages and is now more frequently introduced early in the management of type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

Insulin is at the center of the diabetes problem. In people with type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin effectively. The pancreas compensates by overproducing insulin, and in time, it simply cannot keep up with the demands of the body to keep glucose levels down. To provide enough insulin to the body to manage blood glucose levels, many diabetics are advised to take insulin shots. The insulin in these injections is a chemical that is produced artificially to resemble the insulin made in our pancreas. This insulin works just like natural insulin by escorting sugar from our blood into our cells. Type 2 diabetics deal with a condition known as insulin resistance. It is a phenomenon where cells aren’t sensitive to the action of insulin (escorting blood glucose into cells) and hence, do not respond to it. This leads to the accumulation of glucose in the blood and is called hyperglycemia. Supplemental insulin given to Type 2 diabetics helps the body ‘muscle’ sugar out of the bloodstream and into cells. Insulin injections are used to regulate blood sugar differently for the different diabetes-types: For people who have type 1 diabetes – Their bodies cannot make insulin and therefore they aren’t able to regulate the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. For people who have type 2 diabetes – Their bodies aren’t able to produce enough insulin, or use it effectively. The insulin shots are used because the blood sugar cannot be regulated with oral medications alone. They also stop the liver from producing more sugar. Every type of insulin available in a drug store works in this way. They, mainly, differ in two ways – How quickly they begin to work For how long they can regulate blood sugar levels Mechanism of Action Regulating the process in which glucose Continue reading >>

What Happens When A Diabetic Stops Taking Their Insulin On Their Own?

What Happens When A Diabetic Stops Taking Their Insulin On Their Own?

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes Swallowing pills, checking your blood sugar all the time, or sticking yourself with needles full of insulin probably doesn't sound like your idea of a good time. But taking steps to keep your diabetes under control is your best shot at preventing a slew of frightening complications. If you don't take care of yourself, "diabetes complications typically start within 5 years; within 10 to 15 years, the majority of patients will progress to have multiple health issues," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Fortunately, eating a nutritious diet, exercising, and taking your medication may not only stop complications from progressing, but can also reverse them, she says. Need motivation to stick to your treatment plan? Here's what can happen when you slack off. Your cholesterol and blood pressure rise. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar; with type 2 diabetes, your body can't properly use the insulin you do produce. In turn, your HDL (or "good") cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure. As a result, about 70% of people with either type of diabetes also have hypertension—a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. (Add these 13 power foods to your diet to help lower blood pressure naturally.) Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at Joslin Continue reading >>

Diabetic Put Her Life At Risk To Lose Weight: Mother Stopped Taking Her Insulin Injections After Ballooning To 19 Stone

Diabetic Put Her Life At Risk To Lose Weight: Mother Stopped Taking Her Insulin Injections After Ballooning To 19 Stone

A diabetic mother whose weight ballooned during pregnancy put her life at risk when she stopped taking her insulin medication in a bid to slim down. Hayleigh Juggins ignored doctors' advice, halting the treatment for her diabetes having blamed the hormone for her weight reaching 19st. The 20-year-old was diagnosed with type one diabetes when she was 15 years old. When she fell pregnant three years later, she began taking high doses of insulin, which she claims led to rapid weight gain. By the time she gave birth when she was 19, she weighed 19st and was wearing size 22 clothes. Horrified, she decided to disregard doctors’ instructions to take insulin after each meal and subsequently found herself shrinking. Stable today at 10st 10lb, Miss Juggins says that despite being pleased at gaining her dream figure, she will never again risk serious damage to her health by going against medical advice. She said: ‘There was a war within me - on the one hand I was distraught at having gained so much weight during pregnancy, but on the other I knew what I was doing was bad for me. Indeed, experts stress that skipping insulin can have devastating consequences, including brain damage and death. Libby Dowling, Diabetes UK Clinical Advisor, said: 'Skipping insulin to lose weight is extremely dangerous. This is because if you haven't got enough insulin in your body your blood glucose will get too high, which can lead to devastating health complications. 'In the short term it can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, an extremely dangerous condition that requires immediate medical attention and treatment in hospital, and can even be fatal. And in the long term skipping insulin can lead to complications such as blindness, stroke and amputations. 'It is crucial that people who are omitting the Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

People with type 2 diabetes do not always have to take insulin right away; that is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. The longer someone has type 2 diabetes, the more likely they will require insulin. Just as in type 1 diabetes, insulin is a way to control your blood glucose level. With type 2 diabetes, though, dietary changes, increasing physical activity, and some oral medications are usually enough to bring your blood glucose to a normal level. To learn about how the hormone insulin works, we have an article that explains the role of insulin. There are several reasons people with type 2 diabetes may want to use insulin: It can quickly bring your blood glucose level down to a healthier range. If your blood glucose level is excessively high when you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the doctor may have you use insulin to lower your blood glucose level—in a way that’s much faster than diet and exercise. Insulin will give your body a respite; it (and especially the beta cells that produce insulin) has been working overtime to try to bring down your blood glucose level. In this scenario, you’d also watch what you eat and exercise, but having your blood glucose under better control may make it easier to adjust to those lifestyle changes. It has fewer side effects than some of the medications: Insulin is a synthetic version of a hormone our bodies produce. Therefore, it interacts with your body in a more natural way than medications do, leading to fewer side effects. The one side effect is hypoglycemia. It can be cheaper. Diabetes medications can be expensive, although there is an array of options that try to cater to people of all economic levels. However, insulin is generally cheaper than medications (on a monthly basis), especially if the doctor wants yo Continue reading >>

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

Common Questions About Diabetes Medicines

How do I know if my diabetes pill is working? The best way to find out how well your diabetes pill is working is to test your blood sugar. Ask a member of your health care team what time of day is best for testing. You'll want to test when your diabetes medicine is expected to be most active in your body. Keep a record of your blood sugar levels (PDF) during that time to see if they're at or near your goal. If your levels are at or near your goal and you're not having any problems with the medicine, then it's probably working well. If you're still not sure, talk to your doctor or other member of your care team. Can I stop taking my diabetes medicine after my blood sugar is under control? It's reasonable to think that after a person gets good blood sugar control, it means the end of managing diabetes. But that's not the case. People with type 1 diabetes aren't able to make their own insulin, so they will always need to take insulin shots every day. For people with type 2 diabetes who are on medicine, the answer isn't as clear. Sometimes when people are first diagnosed, they start on pills or insulin right away. If the person also works hard to control diabetes with diet and exercise, he or she can lower the need for medicine and might be able to stop taking it altogether. As long as the person is able to keep blood sugar levels normal with diet and exercise, there isn't a need for medicine. However, type 2 diabetes changes over time. The change can be fast or slow, but it does change. This means that even if a person was able to stop taking medicine for a while, he or she might need to start taking it again in the future. If a person is taking medicine to keep blood sugar normal, then it's important to keep taking it to lower the chances for heart disease and other healt Continue reading >>

Ask Dr. Stork: Can I Avoid Insulin Shots For My Type 2 Diabetes?

Ask Dr. Stork: Can I Avoid Insulin Shots For My Type 2 Diabetes?

Q: My doctor says I may need to start insulin shots for my type 2 diabetes. Can I avoid this? –Maria A. Murphy, 63, Worcester, MA A: It's possible. Let me tell you a quick story: My dad was diagnosed with elevated blood glucose (prediabetes) a while back and was too embarrassed to tell me. When I finally found out from my mom—6 months later!—I realized that nobody had talked to him about lifestyle changes he could make to improve his health and blood glucose levels. We figured out a plan in which he started walking every day and cut out refined sugars, white flour, and other simple carbohydrates—and he was able to get off his diabetes medication within a few months. Ten years later, he's still off medication. [sidebar] What's the moral here? That the hands-down best treatment for type 2 diabetes—at almost any stage—is to make healthy lifestyle changes. If you can become more active; eat fewer processed, high-sugar foods; and drop excess weight, you may be able to avoid insulin altogether or possibly stop taking it if you've already started. That's because type 2 diabetes develops when your body becomes resistant to insulin in the bloodstream and can't use it to regulate blood sugar levels. With regular exercise and other positive changes, your muscles become more responsive to insulin. As you replace body fat with muscle, that lean muscle mass needs glucose for fuel, so it uses up excess sugar in your bloodstream and helps stabilize your blood sugar. (Check out the Wonder Workout for the ultimate plan to reverse prediabetes.) But never make changes to your medication on your own. You'll want to work hand in hand with your doctor to come up with a plan. Unfortunately, some patients do everything right and still need medication. But that doesn't mean your effo Continue reading >>

What Are The Consequences If A Patient Stops Taking Insulin In Type 1 Diabetes And Is Type 1 Is Curable?

What Are The Consequences If A Patient Stops Taking Insulin In Type 1 Diabetes And Is Type 1 Is Curable?

Thank you for A2A. I guess I am qualified enough to answer having worked at the treatment of T1D for almost 1.5 years. TLDR : There are adverse effects of insulin weaning. There is no cure of T1D yet. But we do have promising treatments under Phase 2 and 3 clinical trials (later stages of drug development) so there is hope. We might see a successful drug in coming decade. Animesh Agrawal has covered etiology (the cause of disease) very well. I will add a few things here. You are not alone : Type 1 or juvenile diabetes affects approximately 70,000 children under the age of 15 every year and around 3.2 million people in the world die due to diabetes or its related causes per year. We don’t know our enemy and hence winning it is difficult : Type I diabetes is an autoimmune disorder (our defence mechanism offends our body) and it may develop at any age. Incomplete understanding of the mechanism of disease development and progression prevents the development of any rationally designed drug. The reasons of T1D are varied and include susceptible genes , enterovirus infection, etc. Presently the treatment involves insulin administration by injection or pump. Both are invasive methods, painful enough and hence non-compliance is usually observed in patients. The present treatment is also an economic burden to patients. Consequences of stopping Insulin in T1D : In layman terms there can be following, Preliminary symptoms: Fever, headache, gastrointestinal disorders, reduction in weight Symptoms in longer run: metabolic disorders, vulnerability to other diseases But these are very generalised, symptoms depend on age group and other factors like gender, extent of destruction of beta cells (cells that make insulin in body). See Nandan Karn 's answer for details. Treatment : Insulin Continue reading >>

Insulin Usually Better Than Oral Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Usually Better Than Oral Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

According to a study published in , the combination of insulin and metformin may not benefit individuals with type 2 diabetes. Although the combination results in less weight gain, improved blood glucose control and less need for insulin, the researchers state that further research is required in order to provide solid evidence regarding the benefits and harms, as well as the risks of premature death. The study was conducted by researchers from the Copenhagen Trial Unit, Steno Hospital and the Copenhagen University Hospital. At present, guidelines recommend metformin, an oral blood glucose reducing medication, for type 2 diabetics starting insulin treatment. The researchers examined 2,217 individuals aged 18+ with type 2 diabetes. Among the trials examined, the team found insufficient reports of important patient outcomes, such as total mortality and death from heart disease. According to 20 trials, levels of HbA1c (a measure of average blood glucose levels over time) were reduced when insulin and metformin was taken together. Furthermore, the researchers found that the combination of drugs considerably reduced weight gain and body mass index (BMI) by an average of 1.6 kg. The researchers state that additional studies are required in order to research the long term benefits and harms of the combination, as it increases the risk of severe hypoglycaemic attack. In this week's BMJ podcast, Trish Groves, the deputy editor of BMJ, talks to lead author Bianca Hemmingsen about how this study was able to draw on more data than prior studies, and how the researchers examined major complications and mortality instead of surrogate outcomes, such as blood sugar levels and weight. In addition, Dr. Hemmingsen highlights the insufficient evidence for determining if the combination or Continue reading >>

Stopped Taking Insulin - Blood Sugars Fine. Advice!!

Stopped Taking Insulin - Blood Sugars Fine. Advice!!

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Stopped taking insulin - blood sugars fine. Advice!! sorry about the dramatic subject. Bit of a back story diagnosed in 2003, now 24. hba1c levels around 6-6.5 so happy with that. Weigh about 12 and a half stone (~173lbs, ~78KG) with a BMI of 24.8. Want to lose some weight and get a bit fitter so I've started a diet where by I eat no carbs and am getting a fair amount of cardio done a week (around 3 hours' worth plus and hours walk to work and back every day). Now before all this dieting started I was still quite active and was on about 12 units of levemir in the morning, same at night and taking novorapid on a carb counting basis (sometimes 4/5 times a day). Now since I am not taking any carbs during the day I have obviously had no need to inject. The first few days I was getting hypos to a point where I was taking less and less levemir of a morning and night. Now today and yesterday I am at a point where I have take 0 units of either levemir or novorapid so haven't injected in two days. The thing is I am religious about my blood sugar readings and the average has been 5.6 over the last two days (highest 8.6 which some how came down to ~6 within a few hours) So I guess my question is, are blood sugars the only danger I have to look out for in terms of diabetes? Do I need to inject insulin for insulin's sake for a want of a better expression. Many thanks for all advice. Ok you need to work out a basal level. Even if you don't eat any carb you blood sugar will creep up overtime. Insulin is only one side of an equation - your body still produces Glycogen which is like the opposite of insulin. It raisies blood sugar in the body. Your body will naturally Continue reading >>

Why Insulin Use Isn't Always Permanent For Type 2 Diabetes

Why Insulin Use Isn't Always Permanent For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight loss and exercise may reduce your need for insulin.(HEALTH/FOTOLIA) If your doctor puts you on insulin, it's not necessarily permanent. Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, who need insulin to survive, people with type 2 diabetes use insulin as just one more tool to control blood sugar. You may be able to go off insulin if you can get your blood sugar under control using diet and exercise. "A person who is very, very obese or very heavy will find that if they lose a large amount of weight, their insulin requirements or their oral medication requirements may drop tremendouslyeven disappear," says Richard Hellman, MD, former president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Taking insulin just after diagnosis may also make it easier in the long term to control your blood sugar with diet and exercise, according William Bornstein, MD, an endocrinologist at the Emory Clinic in Atlanta. Stopping Insulin Some people may be able to stop taking it Watch videoMore about using insulin Glucose toxicity "When the sugar has been running high it creates in and of itself a resistance to other things to bring it down. It's a term we call glucose toxicity," says Dr. Bornstein. "So let's say that somebody comes in and their blood sugar is running pretty high and they want to try diet and exercise. It's less likely that the diet and exercise will work to bring it down. "So we might use medication for a period of time, bring it down, then stop the medication and let that individual have a period of time to try diet and exercise and see if that'll work to keep it down," says Dr. Bornstein. If you've developed diabetes recently and needed insulin right away, there's a better chance that you may be able to eventually reduce your dose or even stop taking insulin if you e Continue reading >>

Should I Use Diabetes Pills Or Insulin?

Should I Use Diabetes Pills Or Insulin?

Diabetes affects the way your body breaks down food. Treatment depends on which type of diabetes you have. In type 1 diabetes, your pancreas stops producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate glucose, or sugar, in your blood. Type 2 diabetes starts with insulin resistance. Your pancreas no longer produces enough insulin or doesn’t use it efficiently. Every cell in your body uses glucose for energy. If insulin isn’t doing its job, glucose builds up in your blood. This causes a condition called hyperglycemia. Low blood glucose is called hypoglycemia. Both can lead to serious complications. A variety of pills are available to treat diabetes, but they can’t help everyone. They only work if your pancreas still produces some insulin. They can’t treat type 1 diabetes. They aren’t effective in people with type 2 diabetes when the pancreas has stopped making insulin. Some people with type 2 diabetes can benefit from using both pills and insulin. Some pills to treat diabetes include: Biguanides Metformin (Glucophage, Fortamet, Riomet, Glumetza) is a biguanide. It lowers the amount of glucose in your liver and boosts insulin sensitivity. It may also improve cholesterol levels and might help you lose a little weight. People normally take it twice per day with meals. You can take the extended-release version once per day. Potential side effects include: upset stomach nausea bloating gas diarrhea a temporary loss of appetite It may also cause lactic acidosis in people with kidney failure, but this is rare. Sulfonylureas Sulfonylureas are fast-acting medications that help the pancreas release insulin after meals. They include: People usually take these medications once per day with a meal. Potential side effects include: irritability low blood glucose upset st Continue reading >>

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