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Can I Give My Dog Insulin 2 Hours Early

Helpful Hints From Experienced Owners

Helpful Hints From Experienced Owners

General tips for daily care You and Your Vet Insulin Hypoglycemia and Sugar For all owners Multi-pet and Multi-owner homes Recordkeeping Reality This section provides you an opportunity to learn from the experiences and mistakes of others. Diabetes is a complicated disease and there's a lot to learn. As with all new or complicated things, mistakes are inevitable and you will have to deal with them. Read through the helpful hints and mistakes owners have shared and hopefully you can benefit from their experiences and avoid some common pitfalls. General tips for daily care Have your pet wear an identification tag that says "DIABETIC". You can have other information like the vet's name and phone number. Get it here or somewhere else, but get your pet a DIABETIC tag! It could save your pet's life. This is an associate link. We earn a 20% commission on all sales and it helps support our site. Educate yourself. You are responsible for the daily care of your pet. Eventually you must have a thorough enough understanding of diabetes to be able to make some of the daily decisions on your own. You may not be able to contact your regular vet when a minor question arises and you must have the confidence to make a decision. Don't become complacent. Diabetes can be a changing condition in your pet. Just because your pet is doing well for a few weeks or months doesn't mean something can't change. Always be observant for signs of change. Don't panic. Hypoglycemic episodes can be frightening, but you have to stay calm and think clearly so you can treat the hypo appropriately. Don't under-treat and don't over-treat and give your pet so much sugar or junk-food that the bgs are sky high for days. You don't have to master everything all at once. For example, home bg testing can be stressful Continue reading >>

What Should I Do If I Accidentally Give My Pet A Double Dose Of Insulin?

What Should I Do If I Accidentally Give My Pet A Double Dose Of Insulin?

My 78 pound Dobe was given her insulin with her normal food at 3:00. At 6:00 my son gave her dinner, again her insulin and normal food amount…upon realizing this we gave her some honey on bread which she hungrly ate….about 2 hours later we gave a bit more food……it has been 7 hours since her original dose and 4 hours since the second “mistake” dose…are we pretty close to being out of danger of an overdose? Sandy Insulin is a medication used to treat diabetes in cats and dogs. Diabetes is a disease characterized by high blood sugar. Insulin causes blood sugar to drop. Too much insulin can lead to dangerously low blood sugar. Dogs or cats that receive more than their usual dose of insulin are at risk of a hypoglycemic crisis that can lead in the worst cases to seizures, coma, and death. Anyone who accidentally overdoses his or her pet on insulin should seek veterinary care immediately. The vet will monitor blood sugar and administer intravenous glucose as needed until the medication has worn off. Different types of insulin have different lengths of duration. Some short acting insulins wear off in a few hours. Other, longer lasting insulins such as glargine (Lantus) can last for 12 to 24 hours. This leads to a variation in the length of time an overdosed pet requires in the hospital. Insulin overdoses can be serious business. Even if your pet seems fine, her blood sugar could be dangerously low. Go straight to the vet. Continue reading >>

How To Give A Shot Of Insulin For Dogs In 3 Steps

How To Give A Shot Of Insulin For Dogs In 3 Steps

When you have a diabetic dog, changing their diet and lifestyle can seem like the "easy" part compared to having to give your dog a daily insulin shot. Here are 3 easy steps to administering an insulin shot. Take heart, it's actually easier than it looks. If your dog has been diagnosed with canine diabetes, your vet has probably prescribed insulin injections. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate the body’s blood sugar, or glucose, levels. Dogs with diabetes can only regulate their blood sugar with insulin injections, so you’ll have to learn to give a shot of insulin to your dog. Diabetes affects as many as 1 in 500 dogs. It’s a common health problem, and one that is manageable with consistent treatment and lifestyle changes. Many pet parents are understandably nervous about giving their dog shots, but when properly given they cause only minimal discomfort. Once you master these steps, the process will be a quick part of your—and your dog’s—routine. Your veterinarian will give you the proper dosage and the number of shots a day your dog needs –it’s important to give the injections at the same time each day. Step 1. Store the insulin carefully Insulin can be a fragile substance. It should not be exposed to direct sunlight or stored in high temperatures. Keep your unused bottles in the refrigerator, not frozen. Storing it in the fridge door is often recommended. If the insulin bottle looks frosted, was possibly exposed to heat, or the liquid seems unevenly colored, start with a new vial to be safe. Do not use insulin past the expiration date on the bottle. TIP: Although insulin is sensitive to extreme temperatures, bringing it to room temperature before use will not harm the hormone and may be more comfortable at the injection site for your pet. Step 2. Continue reading >>

Can Twice-daily Insulin Be Injected At Any Time Of The Day?

Can Twice-daily Insulin Be Injected At Any Time Of The Day?

I have questions regarding treatment of a 8-year old, male labrador retriever with poorly-regulated diabetes. He has been treated with once daily insulin (Vetsulin), administered once a day in the morning at 11 pm for the last 3 months. Despite insulin treatment, the dog remains hyperglycemic and glycosuric and if very thin. The owner has a very odd work schedule, and he is not generally home in the early morning when the AM dose of insulin is generally given, so that's why the insulin shot is given in the late morning. I would like to put him on twice daily insulin; however, I was hesitant because the dog would have to get the two doses of insulin at 11 am and 11 pm if we are going to give the insulin at 12-hour intervals. I have always assumed there was some sort of diurnal influence on blood glucose concentrations that mandated that we give the insulin first thing in the morning (6-8 am at time of breakfast) and then again in the early evening at dinner time. But when I actually dug out my physiology textbook and did not some on-line research, I didn't find any mention of this. So my questions— is there any reason to not give him insulin injections at different times during the day? Why do we routinely start injections in the earlier morning— is just because that's when animals (and people) typically get fed? My Response: The problem of nocturnal hypoglycemia in human diabetics In human patients treated with insulin (type 1 diabetes), nocturnal hypoglycemia is a well-recognized complication that can lead to major problems in regulation (1-7). Almost half of all episodes of severe hypoglycemia that develops in human patients occur at night during sleep. Such episodes of nocturnal hypoglycemia can be prolonged and can lead to seizures or coma in rare cases (7). In Continue reading >>

Feeding Schedule For Diabetic Dogs

Feeding Schedule For Diabetic Dogs

Go to site For Pet Owners Good glycemic control is dependent upon a controlled and consistent dietary intake. It is important to achieve and then maintain a normal body weight, because this is a strong indicator of good diabetic control. The dietary requirements of a diabetic dog are highly variable—diet must be individually tailored for each dog. Body weight is a major factor in diet selections. Obese dogs require reduced caloric intake, either through feeding a calorie-restricted diet or by feeding a reduced quantity of the normal diet. Increasing physical activity will also be beneficial in obese dogs. Conversely, underweight dogs may require calorie-rich diets such as pediatric or convalescent diets. Another important consideration is the presence of concurrent disease, for example, renal failure or pancreatitis. It may be that the dietary management for these associated problems is more critical than a specific "diabetic" diet. Dogs tend to gobble their food. Traditionally, the dog’s daily food intake should be divided into 2 meals. The first meal is given around the time of the morning insulin injection, and the second meal is given approximately 7.5 hours (6 to 10 hours) later, at the time of peak insulin activity. Fiber-rich diets have been shown to slow the postprandial glucose surge in dogs, which consequently improves glycemic control. Timing of meals Meals should be timed so that the absorption of glucose from the gastrointestinal tract coincides with the peak action of the administered insulin. This will minimize fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations and thus episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. 1. Dogs administered insulin once daily The first meal (eg, 2/3 of the daily ration) is given prior to the morning insulin injection. This allows Continue reading >>

Timing Meals With Injections

Timing Meals With Injections

Pages 77 - 79 To review, unlike diabetes in humans, it is uncommon for dog diabetes to be well-controlled by simply adjusting the diet. Diet does, however, still play an important role in the dog's care. Chapter 7 described the importance of including high quality, species-appropriate ingredients in the diet. It also discussed the concept of how consistency from meal to meal can be achieved and how this will help regulate a dog's insulin dosage and glucose levels. We will discuss the spacing of meals in this chapter, as it is closely related to insulin activity. Depending on the type of food, blood sugar begins to rise 1 to 2 hours after a meal is ingested. Diabetic dogs typically do best when they are fed 2, 3, or 4 small meals each day. These dogs maintain more consistent blood sugar levels than those dogs fed only once a day. Severe highs and lows in glucose can be dangerous for your dog. Occasionally, a dog that is a finicky eater may have developed the habit of free-feeding, or nibbling all day long. In most cases it is better to permit this schedule. The goal in feeding is to ensure that the dog has food in his system when the insulin activity peaks. Dogs receiving two daily insulin injections at 12-hour intervals should also receive two meals at about 12-hour intervals. Dogs receiving only a single insulin injection should receive a main meal prior to that injection, but they too, will benefit from several more meals spaced throughout the day. Meals should be offered about 15 minutes to the insulin injection. This is a slight departure from the routine followed by human diabetics, but for good reason. Dogs with diabetes often suffer from other digestive complaints. They vomit more readily than do humans. Feeding the meal prior to injection helps ensure that gluco Continue reading >>

Do My Dog's Insulin Injections Have To Be Exactly 12 Hours Apart?

Do My Dog's Insulin Injections Have To Be Exactly 12 Hours Apart?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) In a perfect world, a dog’s insulin injections would be given exactly 12 hours apart, but rarely can an owner do this day in and day out. It is perfectly acceptable to give a dog its insulin injections a little early or late every so often (2 hours or so in either direction). If problems with scheduling are very frequent or result in doses that are routinely given more than two hours late or early, talk to your veterinarian. He or she will probably be able to come up with alternative dosing schedule that will be easier to maintain and result in more consistent blood sugar levels for the dog throughout the day. Keep in mind that is always safer to skip an insulin injection than risk giving two doses too close apart. Related entries: Continue reading >>

Better To Give Insulin Shot Early Or Late? - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Better To Give Insulin Shot Early Or Late? - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Better to give insulin shot early or late? Diabetes Discussion: Your Dog Anything related to your diabetic dog. Better to give insulin shot early or late? I have to go away this evening and I have a question...Sparky should have his insulin shot at 7:30 pm, I will be leaving at 5:00, won't be home until after 10:00 pm. In your opinions should I administer the injection early or wait and give it when I get back home? Thanks in advance for all your speedy answers Re: Better to give insulin shot early or late? In that situation, I would probably FEED and give the shot early, and maybe pull back a little bit on the dose. I also will sometimes test my dog right before feeding and shot to see where here bg stands. You could also wait until you get home, then work Sparky back up to the regular hour over the next couple of days. Zoe: 12 yr old Black Lab/shepherd mix. Diagnosed 6/1/11. Currently on 15 units Novolin NPH 2x day, and hopefully as close to regulated as possible. Feeding merrick Grain Free Salmon and Sweet Potato. Weight 63lbs. Re: Better to give insulin shot early or late? i agree with cebe shot early and reduce the dose Re: Better to give insulin shot early or late? me three, that is what I have done. I'd rather have her sugar run high than low so I cut the dose quite a bit Jenny: 6/6/2000 - 11/10/2014 She lived with diabetes and cushings for 3 1/2 years. She was one of a kind and we miss her. All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:46 AM. Disclaimer -- The content on this site is provided for informational and educational purposes only. While we make every effort to present information that is accurate and reliable, the views expressed here are not meant to be a substitute for the advice provided by a licensed veterinarian. Please consult with your veterinarian Continue reading >>

Handling A Diabetes Emergency

Handling A Diabetes Emergency

Emergencies can happen at any time, so it's best to be prepared and know what to do if an emergency occurs. Talking with your veterinarian is a crucial part of being informed and prepared to handle emergencies. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) The most common side effect experienced with insulin therapy is hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can be caused by: Missing or delaying food. Change in food, diet, or amount fed. Infection or illness. Change in the body's need for insulin. Diseases of the adrenal, pituitary, or thyroid glands, or progression of liver or kidney disease. Interaction with other drugs (such as steroids). Change (increase) in exercise. Signs of hypoglycemia may occur suddenly and can include: Weakness Depression Behavioral changes Muscle twitching Anxiety Seizures Coma Death See below for a list of other side effects. What to do If your pet is conscious, rub a tablespoon of corn syrup on his or her gums. When your pet is able to swallow, feed him or her a usual meal and contact your veterinarian. If your pet is unconscious or having a seizure, this is a medical emergency. CONTACT YOUR VETERINARIAN. In the meantime, you should immediately treat your pet rather than delaying management. Pour a small amount of a sugar solution (eg, corn syrup) onto your finger and then rub the sugar solution onto your pet's gums. The sugar is absorbed very quickly and your pet should respond in 1 to 2 minutes. The sugar solution should never be poured directly into your pet's mouth since there is a risk that the solution will be inhaled into the lungs. Once your pet has responded to the sugar administration and is sitting up, it can be fed a small amount of its regular food. Once the pet has stabilized, it should be transported to your veterinarian for evaluation. Your pet's diet Continue reading >>

Guidelines For Insulin Shots For Diabetic Pets

Guidelines For Insulin Shots For Diabetic Pets

I can’t think of a disease that causes more owner anxiety than diabetes. Something about having to give a shot twice a day, every day, to an animal you love is very daunting. Then you do it a couple times and suddenly, it’s a breeze! I’ll try to help you get “breezy” fast! I’ll also answer the common question of “how far apart can I give the insulin?” Insulin is kept in the refrigerator. Some pens made for humans can be left out for periods of time, but for the most part, plan on refrigerating the insulin. If you have a decent drive to the pharmacy or vet office, bring a little cooler to bring the insulin home. It needs to be gently mixed before each dose. Vetsulin, an insulin made specifically for dogs and cats, can be shaken like a polaroid picture. Other insulins need to be gently inverted in a rocking motion, not shaken like orange juice. Your veterinarian will show you how to give shots, and make sure you get some practice with saline solution! Here’s some pointers (hoping to have a video soon!): We generally aim for the back, between the shoulder, but insulin can be given under the skin anywhere! Try not to hit the exact same place over and over. Some owners move it in a little circle on the back, some do a 4-corners approach. Do what works for you. You basically want a spot that has skin you can easily pinch. Pinch the skin with your thumb and middle finger. That leaves your index finger free. If you’re right handed, do this with your left hand. Feel the “tent” of skin that forms from your pinching. That’s where the shot goes. After drawing up the insulin and getting the bubbles out, hold the syringe with your thumb and middle finger, leaving your index finger free to depress the plunger. Insert the needle completely into the skin. You c Continue reading >>

Missing Insulin Injections

Missing Insulin Injections

Tweet Missed insulin injections are much more of a pain than the injections themselves and can cause a headache as to what effect a late injection will have and what dose should be administered. We look at this common problem and provide some guidance. Always remember that if you are at all unsure what to do, you should contact your health team for advice rather than risk making a mistake. In this article, when it says contact your health team, note that you may need to contact your out of hours service if your health team is not available. Common causes of missed injections Commonly cited reasons for missed injections include: Forgetting to take insulin Oversleeping Not having your injection kit with you Running out of insulin Having a fear of needles Deliberately missing insulin If you have problems with forgetting injections, see our forgetting injections guide dedicated to help prevent problems with forgetting to inject and if you forget whether you have injected or not. What to do if an insulin injection is missed There is not a set rule of what to do if an injection is missed as it can depend on how long ago the injection was meant to be administered and what type of insulin was to be taken. We provide some general tips but if you are in doubt, it is best to consult your health team and follow their advice. If long term/basal insulin was forgotten If you forget to take your long term insulin (basal insulin) and you realise relatively soon, it should usually be fine to inject your usual dose if the dose is given within 2 hours of when it should have been done. In this case, you’ll need to be aware that the injection was taken later and so the insulin will also be active in your body later than it would usually be. In some cases this could increase the chance of h Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

Diabetes Mellitus - Insulin Treatment In Dogs

By Ernest Ward, DVM & Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Emergency Situations, Medical Conditions This handout provides detailed information on insulin administration. For more information about diabetes mellitus, see the fact sheets "Diabetes Mellitus - General Information", and "Diabetes Mellitus - Principles of Treatment". What is diabetes mellitus? In dogs, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar. This is Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (also called Type 1 Diabetes). This type of diabetes usually results from destruction of most or all of the beta-cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. As the name implies, dogs with this type of diabetes require insulin injections to stabilize blood sugar levels. What do I need to know about insulin treatment for diabetes mellitus? In diabetic dogs, the main treatment for regulating blood glucose is giving insulin by injection. Dogs with diabetes mellitus typically require two daily insulin injections as well as a dietary change. Although the dog can go a day or so without insulin and not have a crisis, this should not be a regular occurrence; treatment should be looked upon as part of the dog's daily routine. This means that you, as the dog's owner, must make both a financial commitment and a personal commitment to treat your dog. If are out of town or go on vacation, your dog must receive proper treatment in your absence. Initially, your dog may be hospitalized for a few days to deal with any immediate crisis and to begin the insulin regulation process. For instance, if your dog is so sick that he has quit eating and drinking for several days, he may be experiencing “diabetic ketoacidosis,” which may require a several days of intensive care. On Continue reading >>

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

Timing Is Everything | Pet Diabetes Care

A friend recently told me that she always comes up with the perfect comeback. Her problem is that she thinks of it 20 minutes too late. Yep, sometimes timing is everything. When it comes to diabetes care of our pets, timing can make the difference between a well regulated diabetic pet and a “mostly” regulated diabetic pet. Routines may not be exciting, but routines make for a well-regulated diabetic pet! After two plus decades practicing veterinary medicine, I sometimes think I have heard it all. Then a client comes along and proves me wrong. Recently one of my own veterinary clients told me he routinely gave his cat the insulin then waited an hour before feeding his pet. I don’t know where this client got this notion as I had told him what I tell all my clients, to feed and give insulin at the same time every 12 hours. Now, whether one waits to see if Fluffy is eating before giving the injection is another story. For folks who have a pet with a hearty appetite that couldn’t imagine missing a meal, they may give the injection as the pet dives into dinner. A feeding frenzy is definitely a distraction to the quick poke of an insulin needle. For folks who have a finicky eater, they might watch to make sure the pet truly eats before giving the injection. Nonetheless, I would feed the pet essentially at the same time as the injection rather than waiting any length of time. The insulin needs something to work with. If food is not given with the insulin the pet could become hypoglycemic. How about the timing of meals? Does it matter if a pet eats in between insulin injections? Yes. Just as giving insulin without food can cause a low blood glucose reading, giving food without insulin will cause an elevated blood glucose test result. If you give a snack in the middle of Continue reading >>

Regulation

Regulation

When your pet is first diagnosed with diabetes, your goal is to "regulate" the pet's blood glucose, which may take a few weeks. This process is basically the same as in type-1 diabetic humans. The goal is to adjust diet and insulin dose to keep the blood glucose values in a comfortable range for the pet during the whole day, or most of it. Regulated cats or dogs can "slip out" of regulation at any time because the body is not a static system. Regulation is best done with home blood sugar testing and a species-appropriate diet. The well-regulated diabetic pet should look and act the same as he/she did before diabetes, or like any other non-diabetic pet[1]. For cats, more and more vets are turning to a Low-carb diet to keep the cat's blood sugar levels as constant as possible and allow regulation with a single slow-acting insulin such as PZI, Levemir or Lantus. In this case, the effect on blood sugar of mealtimes is minimal. Dogs may in some cases have their mealtimes strictly scheduled and planned to match with injection times. Cats on faster-acting insulins such as Vetsulin, Caninsulin, Humulin N, or Lente may also benefit from scheduled meals. Free-feeding can work if the amount of food is measured and kept consistent[2]. Consult your veterinarian. For dogs, the most common protocol is feeding and giving insulin injections 12 hours apart, with an Intermediate-acting insulin[3][4]. Meals should be timed so that the maximum effect of the injected insulin occurs after it's been eaten, or post-prandially[5]. Since the insulin regimen for most dogs is of a fixed pattern, having a predictable glycemic response should be achieved each time. This means that each meal should be comprised of roughly the same ingredients and caloric content and fed at the same times each day. If Continue reading >>

Can Dogs With Diabetes Be Treated Without Insulin Injections?

Can Dogs With Diabetes Be Treated Without Insulin Injections?

In almost all cases of canine diabetes, insulin is the recommended treatment. Insulin must be injected and often needs to be given twice daily. However, many dog owners are less than enthusiastic about the thought of giving their dog insulin injections. If you are one of those people who do not like the thought of administering insulin to your dog, you may be wondering if there are other options available for treating your diabetic dog. Are Options Other than Insulin Available for Dogs with Diabetes? Unfortunately, other options for treating diabetes in dogs have proven to be less than successful. At one time, there was hope that the oral hyperglycemic agents that act to lower blood glucose when given by mouth would be useful in treating diabetic dogs. That has not proven to be the case in most instances. Reasons Why Insulin Is the Best Treatment for Diabetic Dogs The primary reason that insulin is the best treatment for canine diabetes is the fact that dogs with diabetes almost always suffer from insulin-dependent diabetes. This means that the cells in the pancreas that normally secrete insulin are no longer functional and the pancreas can no longer secrete insulin in quantities sufficient to regulate your diabetic dog's blood glucose levels. This differs from feline diabetes because, especially early in the disease, cats may suffer from non-insulin dependent diabetes, meaning that their pancreas still retains some ability to secrete insulin. Because some insulin-secreting ability exists for these cats, oral hypoglycemic products may (or may not) be effective. However, in dogs, these products do not work well because the canine diabetic pancreas simply cannot rally to secrete insulin. So, in most cases of canine diabetes, insulin is a necessary part of treatment. In fa Continue reading >>

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