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Can I Eat Purple Potatoes With Diabetes?

Better Purple Mashed Potatoes

Better Purple Mashed Potatoes

Purple Mashed Potatoes Improve Blood Sugar I am often asked if potatoes are okay for people with diabetes to eat. I wrote a blog about this a couple of years ago, which you can read here. I still believe that potatoes are very nutritious and like almost all “real” foods, can be eaten as part of a well-balanced meal. Since I wrote that blog post, I have discovered two additional ways to reduce the carbohydrate content of mashed potatoes, while still getting amazing nutrition: Better Purple Mashed Potatoes One way is with the use of “purple” potatoes! Purple potatoes are a type of potato popular in South America. Not only do they add color to your plate, but they are abundant in antioxidants. They are very similar to the Russet potato in nutritional value, except they have 4 times as much antioxidants. The purple color is created by the antioxidant, anthocyanin. The extra antioxidants in purple potatoes make them even better than russet potatoes for helping to regulate blood pressure, due to their high potassium content. They are also lower on the glycemic scale, therefore, blood sugar regulation is significantly better! The amazing and delicious, “cauliflower” vegetable, can also help with lowering the glycemic index of mashed potatoes, while adding other nutrients and antioxidants. More about cauliflower in another blog, but for now, enjoy this delicious and healthy “Better Purple Mashed Potatoes,” with the addition of cauliflower. For those with a palate difficult to change, give this recipe a try. You will be surprised how great it tastes. I have fooled many who could not tell the difference between regular mashed potatoes, and “Better” Mashed Potatoes! Better Purple Mashed Potatoes Ingredients: Purple Potatoes equivalent to one large russet potato Continue reading >>

6 Colorful Diabetes-fighting Foods

6 Colorful Diabetes-fighting Foods

If you have diabetes , its time to expand your dietary vocabulary. Let's start at the beginning of the alphabet, with "A" for anthocyanins powerful antioxidants known for giving foods their rich coloring. (Think: dark red cherries and vibrant-looking blueberries.) And a study published in 2014 in the Journal of Nutrition shows that anthocyanin-containing foods may also help stabilize and lower blood sugar levels, which makes them a smart addition to yourdiabetes-friendly diet. Here are six tasty choices to add to your shopping list. Anthocyanins give cherries their deep-red color, and research presented at the 2009 Experimental Biology meeting has found that eating a cup and a half of frozen cherries can increase your antioxidant activity for about 12 hours. Other research has shown that regular consumption of tart cherries may reducethe type of belly fat linked to type 2 diabetes , which may lower your risk for heart disease. When you hit the supermarket, keep in mind that experts suggest the fresh kind may be even better for you frozen cherries can lose about 50 percent of their anthocyanins. The American Diabetes Association already says that people should include beans in a diabetes-friendly diet because they'rehigh in fiber and protein, both of which help keep blood sugar levels stable. And now there's another reason to include them in your meals: Red, black, and kidney beans (which get their rich color from anthocyanins) contain certain polyphenols that may help decrease your risk for diabetes-related blood vessel inflammation and heart disease by preventing plaque from clogging up your blood vessels. Anthocyanins are not only responsible for the lush purple color of boysenberries, loganberries, and other dark blackberries, they may also help fight free radicals Continue reading >>

Purple Potatoes: Royal Super Spud

Purple Potatoes: Royal Super Spud

Americans’ love affair with potatoes has added to our weight problems, but purple potatoes may be the super spud we need to negate the downside of white potatoes while improving our health. No matter their size or shape, purple potatoes have royal benefits. Purple potatoes have 4 times the content of antioxidants as russet potatoes. Within hours of eating purple potatoes, the blood is filled with antioxidants, fighting free radicals and protecting cells in the body from damage. The purple pigment comes from anthocyanin. This group of flavonoids appears to help protect us from cancer and heart disease, as well as strengthen the immune system and protect against age-related memory loss. All potatoes are naturally high in potassium, which helps to balance body fluids and regulate blood pressure, but the extra antioxidants in purple potatoes make them even more effective. One of these antioxidants is a polyphenol called chlorogenic acid that has been shown to lower blood pressure in animals. The USDA recently conducted a study with overweight, hypertensive participants. The participants in the treatment group consumed six to eight golf ball-sized purple potatoes, twice daily for one month, and their blood pressure decreased by an average of 4 percent without any weight gain. The next month, the same participants did not eat the purple potatoes, and their blood pressure no longer decreased. It has recently become better understood that chronic inflammation in the body is an important factor in the development of chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and many types of cancer. When studying the effect of potatoes on inflammation in the body, researchers discovered that when people ate white or russet potatoes, their levels of inflammation we Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Sweet Potatoes If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Sweet Potatoes If I Have Diabetes?

Many cases of diabetes, especially type 1 diabetes, come from problems with the ability of the pancreas to regulate insulin, which is important in controlling blood sugar. The pancreas-shaped sweet potato helps to balance blood sugar in diabetics. Research shows that sweet potatoes contain adiponectin, the same hormones that are released from fat cells. Adiponectin tends to improve metabolism and insulin regulation. Unlike other starchy vegetables, sweet potatoes are considered to be an “anti-diabetic food.” This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com Yes diabetics can eat sweet potatoes. Sweet potatoes contain carbohydrates which can raise blood sugar levels. However if you eat the right serving size of a sweet potato you can control the amount of sugar you take in. Also what you put on the potato is important. Avoid added sugars or sweeteners. Absolutely! Sweet potatoes are perfect for any plate but especially for people with diabetes. Compared to white potatoes, sweet potatoes are lower on the glycemic index and deliver chart topping vitamin A for eye health. The fiber helps with blood glucose control and weight management and the potassium helps control blood pressure. One important note... Take care to prepare your sweet potatoes without all of the added sugar, butter or marshmallows that many recipes call for. Go beyond the norm and try sweet potatoes roasted, mashed or even pureed into soup. One sweet potato contains 26 grams of carbs, but that’s partially offset by the 4 grams of fiber. Sweet potatoes contain healthy phytochemicals, too. One idea is to eat just half a sweet potato (topped with butter rather than sugar) and pair it with a protein food. Continue reading >>

Diabetics - Go Pink With Potatoes!

Diabetics - Go Pink With Potatoes!

This World Diabetes day, diabetics in India can go all pink-pink with new currency and pink with potatoes! Sweet Potato is a root vegetable, large, starchy and sweet-tasting in nature. It exists in many varieties with the skin and flesh color ranging from white to yellow, red, pinkish purple or brown. It is only distantly related to the potato. What makes Sweet Potato a Go-For food for diabetics? Many people think about starchy root vegetables as a food group that cannot be helpful in controlling blood sugar levels. That is because they realize that food starches can be converted by our digestive tract into simple sugars, which is true. What is fascinating about Sweet Potatoes is their ability to potentially improve blood sugar regulation-even in people with Type 2 Diabetes. Let us see how: It is rich in dietary fiber which plays 2 important roles in controlling blood sugar: A) delays the process of digestion and absorption of glucose in the blood stream B) provides bulk to the meal to help make you feel full The Glycemic Index (GI) of Sweet Potatoes is in the medium range which is great for diabetes control. GI is the ranking of carbohydrates on a scale from 0 to 100 according to the extent to which they raise blood sugar levels after eating. Last but not the least, it helps satisfy a sweet craving in a healthy way. Other Important Benefits of Sweet Potato Standout source of Beta Carotene – Orange fleshed sweet potato is wealthy in the pigment beta carotene which is a precursor of Vitamin A. Thus, consuming orange Sweet Potatoes will help develop a good vision, strong immune system, proper cell growth and healthy skin. Anti - inflammatory property – The pink and purple fleshed Sweet Potatoes contain a pigment called ‘Anthocyanin’ which exerts anti – inflammat Continue reading >>

Bowel Cancer Risk Slashed By Eating Potatoes - Rainbow Vegetables Could Be Diet Cure

Bowel Cancer Risk Slashed By Eating Potatoes - Rainbow Vegetables Could Be Diet Cure

Colourful fruit and vegetables can help prevent certain forms of cancer Colourful veg and fruit contain a cocktail of chemicals that work to prevent tumours developing by reducing inflammation. Understanding how they work could lead to new drugs for cancer and other potentially fatal conditions, said the team. Food scientist Professor Jairam Vanamala, of Pennsylvania State University, said that building meals and snacks around a variety of coloured fruit and veg maximised the intake of disease-fighting nutrients. She explained: When you eat from the rainbow, like red grapes, purple potatoes, green broccoli, we are not providing one compound, we are providing a wide variety of compounds that work on multiple pathways, and cause the self destruction of cancer stem cells. Colourful vegetables such as purple potatoes contain higher levels of anti-oxidants When you eat from the rainbow, you are providing a wide variety of compounds that work on multiple pathways The study in pigs, which have a digestive system similar to ours, found purple-fleshed potatoes suppressed the spread of colon cancer stem cells, even as part of a high calorie diet. The suppression was linked to lower levels of a harmful protein called interleukin-6 in the potatoes which is believed to be linked to inflammation and the formation of tumours. The findings, published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, reinforce recent research suggesting cultures with plant-based diets tend to have lower bowel cancer rates than those that eat more meat. Continue reading >>

The Big Secret About Sweet Potatoes That Nobody Wants You To Know

The Big Secret About Sweet Potatoes That Nobody Wants You To Know

You and I have been lied to. I don’t know why, and I don’t even know if it’s on purpose, but it pisses me off. And here’s why I’m annoyed… As of 2014, 29 MILLION people in the US had Diabetes (type 2), and 86 MILLION people were pre-diabetic. That’s over 105 MILLION people who have problems with insulin sensitivity and blood sugar. And my dad and my mother-in-law fall into those categories – my dad’s been type 2 diabetic for over a decade, and my mother-in-law has been pre-diabetic for about the same amount of time. So this particular issue hits very close to home (literally) for me – and presumably for almost anybody in the US, since you almost certainly know a few people who are at least pre-diabetic. The Myth About Sweet Potatoes… Everyone (from doctors, to medical researchers, to even the American Diabetes Association) seems to unanimously state that sweet potatoes are unequivocally great for diabetics (please note that when I mention diabetes in this article, I’m referring to type 2 diabetes). If you don’t believe me, here are just a few examples: And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Even on websites that supposedly pay attention to blood-sugar and glycemic load issues, sweet potatoes are almost always classified as a “better” food than things like white potatoes. Unfortunately…It’s All Completely Untrue! Listen. I’m not bashing sweet potatoes. Entire cultures have lived very healthily on sweet potatoes. I eat sweet potatoes myself. But I also have pretty good insulin sensitivity. It’s like this. Fish is pretty darn nutritious, and almost everybody agrees. But if you’re allergic to fish, you shouldn’t be eating it. It’s pretty simple. So the question is whether sweet potatoes are a problem for people with blood sugar Continue reading >>

Sweet Potato For Diabetes: High Carb, High Blood Sugar?!

Sweet Potato For Diabetes: High Carb, High Blood Sugar?!

Not surprisingly, sweet potatoes are heavy in carbs and not so heavy in the proteins, fats, or fiber department. high carb food thats lacking in dietary fiber is not conducive to good blood glucose and A1c control. starchy foods,like sweet potato, may break down into glucose a little bit slower than the carbs in a sugary soda would, but that doesnt mean that you can down a plate of potatoes without bearing some major consequences. In fact, even one medium sweet potato will likely tip the scales, sending your blood sugar soaring. We often encourage a maximum of 20 grams of total carbs for an entire meal (give or take a little), so at 23-26 grams for just the one sweet potato, you don't have much room to add anything else. Not to mention, it's not the So why are we banging on so much about carbs? Quite simply because carbohydrates are the nutrient that influences blood sugar and A1c the most. Since you likely want to achieve lower blood sugar and A1c levels, a fast way to achieve it is cut out your high carb foods potatoes (including sweet potatoes), pasta, rice and bread. Instead, focusing on high-fiber vegetables as your main carbohydrate source. And when you do, chances are your numbers are going to turn around, very fast! I just wanted to share my great results having been on this plan for only one month. 3 months ago my A1C was 8.7 and my recent blood work showed it at 7.4. My endocrinologist was very impressed and thinks I will be at the target level by my next testing in 3 months. I am excited to continue on this plan and maybe I can stop one of my injections. Thank you for your dedication to diabetes research and food plans. The number of carbs isnt the only reason to steer clear of sweet potatoes (and potatoes in general). These starchy root veggies also come wi Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Diabetics have to keep a close eye on their diets, in order to manage carbohydrates and limit their impact on blood glucose and insulin levels. That means high-carbohydrate foods can be problematic, but some, such as sweet potatoes, offer substantial nutritional benefits to offset their impact on blood sugar. Deciding how much or how often you can consume them is an individual decision, but sweet potatoes can certainly find a place in a diabetic meal plan. Carbs in Sweet Potatoes Any discussion of food and diabetes management should begin with the American Diabetes Association's recommendation, which is to count the grams of carbohydrates you eat in a day. The number of carbs you need is calculated based on your body weight and activity levels, but as a rule the ADA suggests aiming for a range of 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal, although some people may require fewer for optimal blood sugar control. By that reckoning, sweet potatoes pose a challenge: One large baked sweet potato provides over 37 grams of carbs, which represents most of your allowance for that meal. By that measure, incorporating a sweet potato can sharply limit what else goes onto your plate. It's Not as Bad as it Looks That being said, there are a couple of reasons sweet potatoes might not throw your meal plan off balance. First, a large sweet potato is a substantial quantity, and if you're diabetic your meal plan probably calls for a serving of no more than 1/3 cup mashed or one small potato. This brings down your total carbohydrates to a much more manageable 12 grams for a small baked sweet potato, or a shade over 19 grams for 1/3 cup boiled, mashed sweet potato. Those figures are still high, but easier to incorporate into your daily total. Also, a large portion of those total carbohydrates Continue reading >>

Should People Suffering From Diabetes Eat Potatoes?

Should People Suffering From Diabetes Eat Potatoes?

Potatoes are a controversial food for diabetics. Most believe that eating potatoes in any form – boiled, baked, fried or in a vegetable preparation can make their glucose levels soar. However, this isn’t completely false. Potatoes can mess with a diabetic’s meal plan. Being a nutrient dense food, high in complex carbohydrates and dietary fibre, they are high on the glycemic index. The glycemic index (GI) is an indicator of how fast the carbohydrates present in your food will raise your blood glucose levels. Foods with high GI will raise the levels quickly as compared to food with low GI value. Here is a sample diabetic meal plan for you to follow. In the case of potatoes, all the starch and carbohydrate present in it breaks down into glucose and raises your blood sugar level after consumption. The GI of a boiled white potato is 85, which is quite high. Here are eight healthy foods that are bad for diabetics. What you can do? That said you don’t have to say no to potatoes completely. If you are cautious about your diet and exercise regularly, then probably you can include potatoes in your meal. Remember, even if you are diabetic your body will still need carbohydrates for energy. So, first consider what your carbohydrate requirement is and how much do you need. Here are seven fruits that are good for diabetics. If you are a diabetic your goal should be to limit your carbohydrate consumption to 45 to 65 percent of your total caloric intake, which means if your consume 2200 calories of food in a day around 1450 calories should come from carbohydrates. This indicates that if you include one small bowl (katori) of potato in one of your main meals you can still be safe. The idea is not to overdo food. Too much aloo ka sabzi can definitely wreck havoc on your glucose l Continue reading >>

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes And Diabetes

Potatoes are starchy tuberous vegetables, which were first domesticated in Bolivia as much as 10,000 years ago. The Spanish introduced potatoes to Europe after the Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire, and since then the potato has become a staple crop around the world. Potatoes are part of the nightshade family (along with fruits like tomatoes and eggplant). The potato plant and fruit are toxic and can cause serious health issues if ingested. That being said, the tubers are generally toxic free (or contains safe levels of the toxin, glycoalkaloid). Toxicity can increase due to exposure to light, age, or physical damage, so you’ll want to be mindful to store potatoes in a dark area and remove any sprouts from the potato before cooking. Potatoes Nutritional Value Potatoes are a good source of dietary fibre, potassium, vitamin B6, and vitamin C. They also contain many other vitamins and minerals in smaller amounts. No, they aren’t low-carb, but a low-carb diet isn’t right for everyone, and it is important to know if there are any health benefits from potatoes. While potatoes are relatively high in carbs (the bulk of the carbs coming from starches), they are one of the best high-carb foods for satiety. That means that potatoes help you feel full sooner and longer than other high-carb foods. This is great because it means you don’t need to eat as many to feel full. Foods that are able to make you feel full longer can be great for weight loss and for minimizing the amount of food you eat. Dietary Fibre The potato peel is an important part of the nutritional value. While the potato itself isn’t super high in dietary fibre, the peel is roughly 50% fibre. Dietary fibre is necessary for maintaining a healthy gut and regulating your digestive system. It’s not healthy t Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Can people with diabetes eat potatoes? The answer is yes, and even more resounding when you have some info in your back pocket. Potatoes come in every form imaginable—from chips to potato salad, from fries to baked potatoes with butter and sour cream. Some forms are obviously more nutritious than others. And all can have varying effects on blood sugar. Here are some recommendations: Sweet potatoes and yams are good choices on the potato spectrum as they have a lower glycemic index and glycemic load than a regular baked russet potato, therefore affecting blood glucose less. Small red potatoes with the skin can also be a good choice. The skin provides fiber, which slows digestion and absorption. And small, whole potatoes may be easier to portion control. Serve a few on your plate as opposed to a whole baked potato or scoop of mashed potatoes. Try to limit fried potatoes and potato chips, choosing roasted, baked or broiled instead. Be aware of portion size. The plate method is an easy way to manage this: about ¼ of your plate should come from starchy foods and only the depth of a deck of cards. It might not be the potato itself wreaking havoc on blood sugar, but instead the portion of potatoes if it is more than about ¾ to 1 cup. Many, many years ago, nurses, dietitians, and diabetes educators were instructed to teach their patients with diabetes to eat certain foods and not eat others. But in more modern times, the belief and teaching method is based on making healthy food choices, understanding portion sizes, and learning the best times to eat in order to manage diabetes. This method of not having to eliminate foods from the diet is supported by the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Blood glucose control and food choice Continue reading >>

Prediabetes And Potatoes: Are Potatoes Ok To Eat?

Prediabetes And Potatoes: Are Potatoes Ok To Eat?

Prediabetes and Potatoes: Are Potatoes Ok to Eat? Many ladies tell me they haven't eaten a potato since they got diagnosed with Prediabetes and Insulin Resistance. Are potatoes bad? Do you have to avoid them? Today I'll tell you if Prediabetes and Potatoes are ok together...AND tell you what you can eat and what you can't. Potatoes have gotten a bad rap lately and most of it is total nonsense! Some people even say eating a potato is the same as drinking soda! I have to tell you ladies...potatoes are VERY healthy for you! Some potatoes are much better than others, AND some ways of cooking potatoes are WAYYYY better for blood sugar control. I'll talk about that in a bit... We need to talk about all the good stuff in potatoes. Potatoes are a Nutrition-Packed Powerhouse 1. Potatoes Have More Potassium Than A Banana! (potassium lowers blood pressure and blood sugar) In fact, in a study of over 12,000 people, the incidence of diabetes went UP as potassium levels went DOWN! And doctors have linked Type 2 Diabetes to low levels of potassium. 2. Potatoes Are An Excellent Source Of Vitamin C Vitamin C deficiency has been linked to poor blood sugar control. Low Vitamin C levels are also linked to inflammation (which you've got tons of because of your Insulin Resistance). 3. Potatoes Are A Good Source Of B Vitamins B vitamins are essential for proper metabolism INCLUDING blood sugar control. Low Vitamin B6 is linked to nerve damage in Type 2 Diabetes. 4. Potatoes Are A Great Source Of Essential Minerals Low magnesium has been linked to Type 2 Diabetes and is essential for proper blood sugar control. Proper mineral balance is also essential for healthy blood pressure levels. High Blood Pressure is linked with Type 2 Diabetes. Prediabetes and Potatoes & Blood Sugar Control A lot of Continue reading >>

Purple Potatoes Lower Blood Pressure In Overweight People

Purple Potatoes Lower Blood Pressure In Overweight People

Purple Potatoes Lower Blood Pressure in Overweight People Eating Colorful Spuds Reduced High Blood Pressure Without Adding Pounds Feb. 3, 2012 -- Looking for an unusual way to lower your blood pressure ? Try an unusually colored potato. When overweight people included two servings of purple potatoes a day in their diet for a month, they not only reduced their blood pressure, they also didn't gain weight in the process, a small study shows. In the study, published online in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers tracked 18 middle-aged adults. Half of them were asked to eat the skin and flesh of six to eight small purple potatoes at lunch and dinner for four weeks, while the others did not add the microwaved taters to their meals. During the second month of the study, the groups switched regimens. Participants were given Purple Majesty potatoes. Compared to those who went spud-free, purple potato eaters had on average drop of slightly more than 4% in diastolic pressure (the bottom number in a reading) and a drop of more than 3% in systolic pressure (the top number). Since 14 out of 18 participants had high blood pressure and nearly all of them took medication for it even during the study, a small blood pressure decrease may help lessen their odds for heart disease . Although potato eaters took in more calories compared to adults given no potatoes, their weight didn't change. That's good news because seven participants were obese and six were overweight . In Korea, purple-colored spuds are considered a folk remedy for weight loss . The researchers suggest that purple potatoes are an effective agent to reduce blood pressure and lower the risk of heart disease and stroke in people with high blood pressure -- without weight gain. As for why the colorful Continue reading >>

Which Potatoes Are The Healthiest?

Which Potatoes Are The Healthiest?

Potatoes are one of the most commonly consumed vegetables with over a billion people eating them, and for good reason. They are extremely versatile and can be prepared in many different ways boiled, steamed, baked , fried and roasted. If you are a fan of potatoes you have probably added them to salads and soups or mashed them up and eaten them as a side. According to the International Potato Center , there are more than 4,000 varieties of native potatoes, most of which are found in the Andes, from which they originate. Of course the varieties sold throughout the United States and other countries are much lower, however there are still more than 100 varieties consumed. These varieties are grouped into various categories including russet, white, red, yellow, purple, blue, fingering and petite. The table below contains nutritional information for 100 g of different potato varieties. As you can see, the 4 different types of potato above are very similar nutritionally. Most potatoes mainly contain carbohydrate with a little bit of protein and almost no fat. There are conflicting thoughts and studies as to how healthy potatoes really are. For example, according to the Harvard School of Public Health , potatoes appear to be a culprit for diabetes and weight gain.The main reason for this is because potatoes have a high glycemic index (GI) and high glycemic load (GL). This means that consuming them causes a large spike in blood sugar and insulin levels, followed by a quick drop. According to the research, potatoes can be as bad as a can of Coca Cola, with the rapid rise and fall in blood sugar leaving people feeling hungry and causing them to overeat. It also appears that the way in which potatoes are prepared affects their GL. For example boiled red potatoes have a GL of 89 wh Continue reading >>

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