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Can High Blood Sugar Cause Miscarriage

Risk Of Miscarriage With Pre-existing Diabetes

Risk Of Miscarriage With Pre-existing Diabetes

Risk of Miscarriage with Pre-Existing Diabetes Risk of Miscarriage with Pre-Existing Diabetes TAGS: pregnancy risks , diabetes and pregnancy , THIS ARTICLE ADAPTED FROM: Balancing Pregnancy with Pre-existing Diabetes If you are a woman with diabetes, maybe you got pregnant easily, or maybe it took a lot of effort. It may be early in your pregnancy, somewhere in the middle, or at term. No matter your history, learning that a pregnancy has ended before it should have can be a disappointing, painful, and sad experience. Miscarriage, also called spontaneous abortion or pregnancy loss, can occur anywhere from the earliest stage through full term. Such a loss does not preclude women from carrying another pregnancy to term and having a healthy baby. Signs of a possible miscarriage include vaginal bleeding (brown, pink, or red), abdominal cramps, and the lack of pregnancy signs you felt before, such as breast sensitivity or food and scent sensitivities (although feelings of nausea and fatigue normally subside around weeks 10 to 12 of pregnancy). Even with these symptoms, though, the pregnancy may be fine. Always contact your doctor if you notice these issues. If you have miscarried with more than two or three losses, you are considered someone with recurrent miscarriage. This warrants a trip to an infertility or high-risk specialist. Potential causes for all women include chromosomal defects, infections, high fevers, hormonal imbalances, autoimmune problems (in addition to diabetes), anatomical abnormalities in the uterus or cervix, and blood incompatibilities or immunological problems where the body attacks the cells of the embryo or the placenta. In many cases, if your A1c is within the recommended preconception range, diabetes likely will not cause a miscarriage. It is hype Continue reading >>

Miscarriage Due To High Blood Sugar? Anyone Had This Happen?

Miscarriage Due To High Blood Sugar? Anyone Had This Happen?

I've had 4 previous miscarriages with the latest being last weekend at 7 weeks. The Dr at the hospital told me my blood sugar is way too high and it is probably the cause of my miscarriages. I've never heard of this before and was wondering if anyone had? I have insulin resistance and PCOS and was finally put on metformin about a year ago after having pancreatitis and my gallbladder removed. I gained a lot of weight and a blood test showed insulin resistance but I don't have diabetes. Whilst taking it I felt better and my weight gain stopped but prior to TTC my GP keeps telling me to stop taking the metformin as it can be harmful in pregnancy. I stop talking the pills and I miscarry Hi OP....I would seek a second opinion, maybe from an OB/GYN...? I was diagnosed with PCOS and insulin resistance after having trouble conceiving. I was told to lose weight (followed a low carb diet) and was put on metformin ( one a day, slow release diabex)... I conceived and my OB told me to stay on the metformin as i would be at risk of miscarrying if I stopped ( due to high blood sugars). I stayed on it for the entire pregnancy, even upped the dose to three a day fromaround 34 weeks as I had slipped over to GD. My baby boy was born perfect, had one low blood sugar reading ( due to my GD) but otherwise no issues at all. Good luck. I have PCOS and am insulin resistant. I am currently on 2000mg on Metformin per day. I am also 35 weeks pregnant. When I fell pregnant I did a lot of research online with regards to continuing Metformin whilst pregnant and found a lot of research that continuing with metformin until at least 12 weeks actually helps prevent miscarriage. My OB agreed and in consultation with an obstetric physician told me to continue with the metformin. I have continued with metf Continue reading >>

Can High Sugar Level Cause Miscarriage

Can High Sugar Level Cause Miscarriage

I once again find myself coming to this board. I don't know how to start. I had a mc which was discovered at an early scan. The pregnancy didn't grow beyond 5 weeks and I had erpc as the sac was still growing. At the time, the private sonographer told me that I should look into losing weight. I am about 3 stones overweight. When I was pregnant with my son, I started off at 8.5 stones and gained a massive amount of weight. I had gestational diabetes during the pregnancy. Within 6 months of his birth I had lost the 4 stones I had gained. I still had 1 stone to lose to get to 8.5 stones. The MC was my second pregnancy and I gained 2 stones within a couple of months. Combined with the 1 stone I still had to lose, I was about 3 stones overweight when I went for the early scan. Anyway I am back to being pregnant again. I am about 5+1 weeks and now am convinced that I will have another mc. I am almost at the point of a breakdown because I have convinced myself that I am fat and I feel my sugar level is too high and this is what is causing the mc. I eat too much carbs. I feel like am in a coma after eating. Is it too late to change now? I feel that I have left it too late. I have an early scan for next week and am preparing myself for the worst news. I don't know what to do. I only just realised this blood sugar thing now and I fear it's too late now and I have already caused the mc to happen. SchnitzelVonCrummsTumThu 21-Sep-17 14:21:38 Uncontrolled diabetes (type 1 especially, but also type 2) is a risk factor for miscarriage but from what you say, I don't think that this is the case for you. I think it's very easy to fear the worst when you've been through a miscarriage but there is no good evidence to suggest eating too much carbohydrate is in itself a risk factor. Can you Continue reading >>

Pregnancy If You Have Diabetes

Pregnancy If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes and plan to have a baby, you should try to get your blood glucose levels close to your target range before you get pregnant. Staying in your target range during pregnancy, which may be different than when you aren’t pregnant, is also important. High blood glucose, also called blood sugar, can harm your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy, even before you know you are pregnant. If you have diabetes and are already pregnant, see your doctor as soon as possible to make a plan to manage your diabetes. Working with your health care team and following your diabetes management plan can help you have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. If you develop diabetes for the first time while you are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes. How can diabetes affect my baby? A baby’s organs, such as the brain, heart, kidneys, and lungs, start forming during the first 8 weeks of pregnancy. High blood glucose levels can be harmful during this early stage and can increase the chance that your baby will have birth defects, such as heart defects or defects of the brain or spine. High blood glucose levels during pregnancy can also increase the chance that your baby will be born too early, weigh too much, or have breathing problems or low blood glucose right after birth. High blood glucose also can increase the chance that you will have a miscarriage or a stillborn baby.1 Stillborn means the baby dies in the womb during the second half of pregnancy. How can my diabetes affect me during pregnancy? Hormonal and other changes in your body during pregnancy affect your blood glucose levels, so you might need to change how you manage your diabetes. Even if you’ve had diabetes for years, you may need to change your meal plan, physical activity routine, and medicines. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well controlled in a pregnant woman with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes could lead to problems for the woman and the baby: Birth Defects The organs of the baby form during the first two months of pregnancy, often before a woman knows that she is pregnant. Blood sugar that is not in control can affect those organs while they are being formed and cause serious birth defects in the developing baby, such as those of the brain, spine, and heart. Download Chart[PDF – 167KB] An Extra Large Baby Diabetes that is not well controlled causes the baby’s blood sugar to be high. The baby is “overfed” and grows extra large. Besides causing discomfort to the woman during the last few months of pregnancy, an extra large baby can lead to problems during delivery for both the mother and the baby. The mother might need a C-Section to deliver the baby. The baby can be born with nerve damage due to pressure on the shoulder during delivery. C- Section (Cesarean Section) A C-section is a surgery to deliver the baby through the mother’s belly. A woman who has diabetes that is not well controlled has a higher chance of needing a C-section to deliver the baby. When the baby is delivered by a C-section, it takes longer for the woman to recover from childbirth. High Blood Pressure (Preeclampsia) When a pregnant woman has high blood pressure, protein in her urine, and often swelling in fingers and toes that doesn’t go away, she might have preeclampsia. It is a serious problem that needs to be watched closely and managed by her doctor. High blood pressure can cause harm to both the woman and her unborn baby. It might lead to the baby being born early and also could cause seizures or a stroke (a blood clot or a bleed in the brain that ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

If you have diabetes or prediabetes and you want a child, can you do it? What will you be getting yourself into? If you’re considering children, here are some things you should know. Pregnancy in diabetes carries serious risks to mother and child. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) says that women with poor diabetes control are at greater risk for birth defects and also miscarriage. Your baby’s organs are completely formed by seven weeks after your last period. That time may be up before you realize you are pregnant. High glucose levels can damage those developing organs. So it’s important, says ADA, to get glucose levels under control before getting pregnant. Doctors recommend three to six months of very good control before trying to conceive. If you have high glucose levels, you may not get pregnant at all. You may conceive normally, but the fertilized egg won’t attach to the uterine lining. Not getting pregnant may be better than pregnancy with out of control diabetes. The ADA lists some common complications for babies of mothers with diabetes. • Three to four times greater risk of birth defects such as heart, brain, and spinal defects, oral clefts, kidney defects, and gastrointestinal problems. • Premature delivery • Miscarriage • Prolonged jaundice (yellowing of the skin) • Respiratory distress (difficulty breathing) The mother faces her own risks. Diabetic eye and kidney problems could get worse. She is at higher-than-normal risk of preeclampsia (high blood pressure, often with protein in the urine), which can be life-threatening. Delivery may be difficult or may require a C-section. Prediabetes pregnancy also risky If you have prediabetes, pregnancy could push you over the line into diabetes. This is called “gestational diabetes.” It ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fertility: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Fertility

Diabetes And Fertility: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Fertility

You’ve have been trying with no luck to get pregnant and have not been able to a find a reason for your infertility. You may have tried a fertility cleanse, begun eating a fertility diet, and are taking all the right supplements and herbs, but are still having trouble conceiving. It may be time to have a simple blood test to determine if your glucose levels are too high. With the rates of Type II diabetes rising every year in the U.S., more and more infertility specialists are looking toward this health issue as a main cause of some otherwise unexplained infertility cases they see. According to the American Diabetes Association, there are more than 200,000 new cases of Type II diabetes diagnosed every year, with another 2.4% of the general childbearing population suffering from the disease but not knowing it. When it comes to diabetes and infertility the answer is clear: there is a connection. No, in many cases (especially among women), diabetes alone does not keep them from getting pregnant, but it oftentimes keeps them from staying pregnant. In many cases, say fertility doctors, “a woman with higher than normal glucose levels does get pregnant month after month. Unfortunately her diabetes status prevents that embryo from implanting in the uterus, causing a miscarriage before she ever realizes she is pregnant.” In this case, the diabetes isn’t preventing conception, but is preventing an ongoing pregnancy. High glucose levels are reported to increase a woman’s chances of miscarriage by 30-60% according to statistics released by the American Diabetes Association. Even when implantation does occur, there are other risks to consider, including: An increased risk of birth defects due to damage caused to embryonic cells form the high levels of glucose in the blood Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Managing Diabetes During Pregnancy

Florence Brown, M.D., Co-Director, Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Diabetes and Pregnancy Program; Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Tamara Takoudes, M.D., Co-Director, Joslin-Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Diabetes and Pregnancy Program; Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 1.85 million women of reproductive age have diabetes, and about 500,000 of them do not know it. As these numbers continue to rise, it is increasingly important for women with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels before they become pregnant because if women have poorly controlled diabetes going into a pregnancy, they are at much higher risk for serious fetal complications. Changing hormones in the body during pregnancy cause blood glucose levels to rise, and high blood glucose levels in early pregnancy (within the first four to six weeks) can result in a 30 to 40 percent chance of having a baby with a birth defect compared to a 2 percent risk in women whose diabetes is in excellent control. Women with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes are also at higher risk for: Large birth weight babies, resulting in more Cesarean deliveries and increased complications during delivery Premature births or fetal death Pre-eclampsia: a dangerous surge in blood pressure associated with protein in the urine Diabetic retinopathy: damage to the retina caused by high glucose levels Nephropathy: diabetic kidney disease Severe hypoglycemia: episodes of low blood glucose that can result in confusion or unconsciousness Ensuring a healthy pregnancy The good news is that women with uncomplicated diabetes who keep their blood glucose levels in a normal range before and during pregnancy have about the same chanc Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Pregnancy: Mediation, Meals & More | Cleveland Clinic

Diabetes & Pregnancy: Mediation, Meals & More | Cleveland Clinic

Eye exam to screen for glaucoma , cataracts , and retinopathy A pre-conception counseling appointment with your health care provider is another important step in preparing for pregnancy. Pre-conception counseling helps educate women so they can be physically and emotionally prepared and healthy for pregnancy. A pre-conception appointment usually includes: An evaluation of your weight: Your health care provider will tell you to try to reach your ideal body weight before becoming pregnant. This means losing weight if you are overweight (to reduce your risk of high blood pressure complications), or gaining weight if you are underweight (to reduce the risk of delivering a low birth-weight baby). A discussion of your lifestyle: Smoking and drinking alcohol are two habits that must be stopped in order for you to have a healthy pregnancy. Smoking during pregnancy affects you and your baby's health before, during, and after your baby is born. The nicotine (the addictive substance in cigarettes), carbon monoxide, and numerous other poisons and chemicals you inhale from a cigarette are carried through your bloodstream and go directly to your baby. Lower the amount of oxygen available to you and your growing baby Increase the chances of miscarriage and stillbirth Increase the risk that your baby is born prematurely and/or born with low birth weight Increase your baby's risk of developing respiratory (breathing) problems Increase the risk of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) Smoking may increase the risk of having an ectopic pregnancy placental problems (placenta previa or placenta abruption ) and vaginal bleeding . Second- and third-hand smoke exposure can also be harmful, both before and after your baby is born. ( Second-hand smoke is smoke that you and your baby breathe in fr Continue reading >>

Can A Sugar Binge Cause A Miscarriage?

Can A Sugar Binge Cause A Miscarriage?

I should be an expert at mc's, but I have no idea about this: I've had some major sugar cravings lately that I gave in to this weekend, so now I'm worried that an insulin spike might possibly kill or harm the baby. I'm not diabetic or even insulin-resistant, but all that sugar at once can't be good for my baby! It si best to keep your blood sugar regulated. Although I am diabetic, so I have been told that it has to be maintained at all times or it will cause an MC. I am sure you are fine though if you dont have sugar issues, your body knows how to regulate itself. Quit worrying!!!! Lol, I know, easier said than done! No it will not cause a miscarriage. Poorly controlled diabetes might but you said you are not diabetic. The vast majority of miscarriages are caused by random genetic faults in the fertilized egg, such as chromosomal abnormalities. These happen at the moment of conception and nothing you do or don't do will change the eventual outcome. Unless you are an alcoholic or drug user or heavy smoker, your behaviour will not cause you to miscarry a genetically healthy baby. However, it is a good idea to watch your diet in pregnancy as all that sugar isn't good for you. Perhaps you needed a boost at the time but in future it is better to space out your meals and snacks so you eat little and often and therefore don't have masssive sugar cravings. Also it's better to go for starchy, slow release carbs to make your energy last longer. The Following User Says Thank You to kat2504 For This Useful Post: Thank you, girls! petitpas, you're right, I need to stop freaking out! I had another freak-out this morning. Our pups got loose and we were frantically chasing them for 20 minutes... I was terrified they would get hit by a car. Afterwards (with both pups safe and sound bac Continue reading >>

The Role Of Diabetes In Miscarriage And Stillbirth

The Role Of Diabetes In Miscarriage And Stillbirth

When humans eat, foods are broken down in the digestive tract into the simplest elements, including glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose is a needed fuel for almost every process in the human body, including brain function. For the body to use glucose as energy, it requires a hormone known as insulin, which is produced by an organ called the pancreas. In diabetes, a persons insulin supply is not sufficient, making it impossible for the body to get and use the energy it needs from glucose. Type 1 Type 1 diabetes (sometimes called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, or IDDM) is a chronic, often life-long condition, in which the pancreas does not produce insulin. The exact causes of the disease are unknown, but it is clear that the immune system is somehow triggered to begin attacking the pancreas. It is usually diagnosed in childhood. The common symptoms are fatigue, extreme thirst and hunger, excessive urination, and weight loss. This type of diabetes requires a person to receive insulin, either through multiple injections each day, or a continuous pump. There is no cure for type 1 Diabetes. Type 2 In type 2 diabetes the cells of the body develop a resistance to insulin, even when the pancreas is able to produce enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes (also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, or NIDDM) is most common in adults, but it can develop in children. It is usually triggered by obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, age, and genetic predisposition. here is an increased risk of type 2 diabetes for people with a family history of the disease, people of African-American, Native American, Asian-American, Latino, and Pacific Islander heritage, and women who have had gestational diabetes. The symptoms are similar to type 1 diabetes. Treatment can vary from nutritional cha Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Women who have diabetes before they get pregnant have special health concerns. In addition to the new demands that a pregnancy will put on your body, it will also affect your blood sugar levels and diabetes medications. If you're thinking about having a baby, take steps to lessen the risks for both you and your child. A pre-conception counseling appointment will help you be physically and emotionally prepared for pregnancy. Meet with your doctor to find out if your diabetes is controlled well enough for you to stop your birth control method. A blood test called the glycosylated hemoglobin test (HbA1c, or just A1c) can show how well it's been going over the past 8 to 12 weeks. Other medical tests can help prevent complications during pregnancy: Eye exam to see if you have glaucoma, cataracts, or retinopathy Blood work to make sure your kidneys and liver are working Foot exam High blood sugar levels early in the pregnancy (before 13 weeks) can cause birth defects. They also can increase the risks of miscarriage and diabetes-related complications. But many women don't know they're pregnant until the baby has been growing for 2 to 4 weeks. That's why you should have good control of your blood sugar before you start trying to conceive. Keep blood glucose levels within the ideal range: 70 to 100 mg/dL before meals Less than 120 mg/dL 2 hours after eating 100-140 mg/dL before your bedtime snack Use your meals, exercise, and diabetes medications to keep a healthy balance. Continue reading >>

Can Low Blood Sugar Cause Miscarriage?

Can Low Blood Sugar Cause Miscarriage?

So, on Saturdays I have a very awkward work shift that stretches over lunch time. I usually don't get to eat until sometime after 2:00. Today, I had a very substantial breakfast around 9:00-9:45. While I was at work, I had a small cup of coffee and as time went on a couple of Jolly Ranchers just to keep me going. However, because of some other stuff, I didn't get to really eat (beyond a piece of bread, a couple more pieces of candy, and a few spoonfuls of peanut butter) until about 4:00. That's six hours of no meals. By the time I ate, my blood sugar felt quite low and I inhaled a personal pizza, a glass of milk, and two pieces of toast with peanut butter. I was about to have an orange too but now I'm worried that the blood sugar spike will be too much for the baby. ANYWAY. I'm 9 weeks 3 days. Ultrasound was good three days ago. I'm not diabetic, though I still haven't heard back from my doctor about gestational diabetes (I don't have any of the risk factors for it). Maybe it's ridiculous, but you just get so much conflicting info while you're pregnant. Someone told me that low blood sugar can cause miscarriage. Anyone know anything about that? Most likely you were just hungry BC your metabolism increases during first trimester. I remember this happening in all my pregnancies, it doesn't indicate GD, that usually doesn't appear until further along in the pregnancy. Def do as another poster said, try to get some portable fast snacks besides candy to keep you going through the day. Drinks, shakes, smoothies - they even have frozen smoothies now you just add water or milk I think and shake it up and good to go. Ensure drinks, v-8, something with some substance should help. Granola bars, applesauce squeezes (not just for kids anymore!) I totally get no breaks - I was a nur Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes In Pregnancy?

What Is Diabetes In Pregnancy?

Having diabetes means that there is too much sugar (glucose) in your blood. Some women have diabetes before they get pregnant. Others start having it during pregnancy. Diabetes that starts during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. If you had diabetes before you became pregnant, it may get harder for you to control your sugar levels during pregnancy. Pregnancy can make both high and low blood sugar levels happen more often. It can make diabetic eye, kidney, heart, blood vessel, and nerve problems worse. You may need to change your insulin dosage. If you were not using insulin before the pregnancy, you may need to use it while you are pregnant. If you develop diabetes during pregnancy, you may need to start a special diet. You may need to have insulin shots or take a pill to help control your blood sugar. If diabetes is not treated well before and during pregnancy, and your sugars are poorly controlled, these problems might occur: The high sugar levels in your blood might cause the baby to get too big before birth. Very large babies tend to have more problems. Babies who are very large or have other problems may need to be delivered by C section. If delivered vaginally, a big baby is slightly more likely to have an injury at the time of delivery. The baby might have birth defects, such as problems with the heart, kidney, spine, or brain. Some of these problems may be life threatening. You might have high blood pressure during the pregnancy, which can cause problems for both you and the baby. You may develop ketones in your blood and urine when you have very high blood sugar. This can cause a very serious, life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. You might go into labor early. The baby might need to be delivered early. After delivery the baby’s blo Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Recurrent Miscarriages

Diabetes And Recurrent Miscarriages

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have had two early pregnancy losses during 2016. 6 months ago I was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes (12mmol/L). I changed my diet to low carb and started exercising regularly and the repeat reading a month later was 9.5mmol/L (I didn't even know it's possible to bring down the levels within a month). I was put on metformin and got pregnant again (both at the same time) but had another early miscarriage. That's when I was offered all recurrent miscarriage tests. However the results showed that everything is in normal range - apart of HbA1c. Now following my low carb diet + exercise and with the help of metformin my level is down to 6.5mmol/L. At times I am finding it really hard to follow the diet but obviously have no other option as I do not want to risk another pregnancy loss (or any other effects of diabetes for that matter). But I was a bit surprised how sugar alone can be the cause of three pregnancy losses! As I have no other health issues (neither my husband) and I have been tested for literally everything that is related to recurrent miscarriages. I am wondering if anyone else had a pregnancy loss due to untreated dieabetes? Also, as the last few months I have been following my diet religiously I am wondering if I have to live like that for the rest of my life? Or does it mean that because this diet brought down my blood sugar levels I can go back to a slightly high carb diet once the levels are steady? It's not easy, before I could enjoy a birthday cake or sweets (and I looove sweets) but now obviously I can't. I wonder how everyone else is coping as newly diagnosed, do. you occasionally have a treat or stick to your diet? Do you cut out all Continue reading >>

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