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Can Dieting Cause Diabetes

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Olivia Yang was stunned when she learned she had type 2 diabetes six years ago, when she was 19. Her doctor was shocked, too. In fact, her physician tested her twice to be sure there wasn’t some mistake. Yang was young, had a normal weight for her 5-foot-2-inch frame, and didn’t consider herself a particularly bad eater. She certainly didn’t seem like someone at risk. Now a new study may hint at why some patients end up with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes even when they don’t appear to have all of the typical risk factors such as age, obesity, and an unhealthy diet. Yang learned of her condition sophomore year of college. She’d gone for a physical — a requirement in order to begin working out with a fitness trainer — but her A1C blood test came back abnormally high, indicating diabetes. An A1C test tells a person’s average blood sugar level over the past few months. More specifically, an A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar. It’s used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and to keep tabs on how a person is managing their condition over time. Normal readings land below 5.7 percent. The range for someone with prediabetes falls between 5.7 and 6.4 percent and indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Anything higher is considered diabetes. Unexpected diagnosis Yang, now 25 and an account executive at an advertising agency in Boston, told CBS News, “It was a shock for me. Type 2 runs in my family. But it happened when my parents were older so it was kind of a shock that I would get it at such a young age.” After the diagnosis, though, she realized she’d had symptoms for a while. “Looking back, I fell asleep a lot. I was tired a lot after I ate, a sym Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

Dear Mark: Does Eating A Low Carb Diet Cause Insulin Resistance?

Dear Mark: Does Eating A Low Carb Diet Cause Insulin Resistance?

157 Comments Despite all the success you might have had with the Primal way of life, doubts can still nag at you. Maybe it’s something you read, or something someone said to you, or a disapproving glance or offhand comment from a person you otherwise respect, but it’s pretty common when you’re doing something, like giving up grains, avoiding processed food, or eating animal fat, that challenges deeply-and-widely held beliefs about health and wellness. It doesn’t really even matter that you’re losing weight or seem to be thriving; you may still have questions. That’s healthy and smart, and it’s totally natural. A question I’ve been getting of late is the effect of reducing carb intake on insulin sensitivity. It’s often bandied about that going low carb is good for folks with insulin resistance, but it’s also said that low carb can worsen insulin resistance. Are both true and, if so, how do they all jibe together? That’s what the reader was wondering with this week’s question: Hi Mark, I’ve been Primal for a few months now and love it. Lowering my carbs and upping my animal fat helped me lose weight and gain tons of energy (not too shabby for a middle-aged guy!). However, I’m a little worried. I’ve heard that low carb diets can increase insulin resistance. Even though I’ve done well and feel great, should I be worried about insulin resistance? Do I need to increase my carb intake? I always thought low carb Primal was supposed to improve insulin function. Vince Going Primal usually does improve insulin sensitivity, both directly and in a roundabout way. It improves directly because you lose weight, you reduce your intake of inflammatory foods, you lower systemic inflammation (by getting some sun, smart exercise, omega-3s, and reducing or dea Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Habits That Can Lead To Diabetes

7 Surprising Habits That Can Lead To Diabetes

You're cutting back on coffee iStock/Wavebreakmedia Your java habit might not be such a bad thing. Studies show that coffee consumption (both caffeinated and decaffeinated) can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. One study analysis by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that those who sipped six cups a day had a 33 percent lower risk of developing the disease compared to non-coffee drinkers. Certain components in coffee seem to reduce insulin resistance and may also boost glucose metabolism, the process of converting glucose to energy. Follow these healthy habits to prevent diabetes. You're a chronic night owl iStock/Marilyn Nieves If late night is your favorite time of day, you might be putting yourself at risk for diabetes. A recent Korean study found that people who stay up until the wee hours of the morning are more likely to develop diabetes than those who hit the sack earlier, even if they still get seven to eight hours of sleep, MensHealth.com reported. Night owls tend to be exposed to higher levels of artificial light from televisions and cell phones, a habit that is linked to lower insulin sensitivity and poorer blood sugar regulation, study author Nan Hee Kim, MD, said in a press release. Staying up late is also linked with poor sleep quality and sleep loss, which can disrupt your metabolism. Ignore these diabetes myths that could be sabotaging your health. Your diet is light on probiotics iStock/SilviaJansen "The risk of diabetes increases when you have more bad bugs [bacteria] than good bugs in your gut," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Your stomach needs good bacteria, called probiotics, for proper digestion; low levels can lead to inflammation that may eventually lead to insulin resistance. Eat f Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What's True And False?

Diabetes: What's True And False?

en espaolLa diabetes: Qu es cierto y qu es falso? If you're like most people with diabetes, you'll get all kinds of advice about it from friends and family or online. Some of this information is wrong. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? No. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system . It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining too much weight leads to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only cause of weight gain. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chance of getting diabetes greater. Yes! You can have your cake and eat it too, just not the whole cake! Like everyone, people with diabetes should put the brakes on eating too many sweets. But you can still enjoy them sometimes. People with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin, at least until scientists find a cure. People with type 2 diabetes will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But if they take steps to live a healthier life, it can sometimes lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines. Can you catch diabetes from a person who has it? No. Diabetes is not Continue reading >>

Foods That Cause Diabetes | Prevention

Foods That Cause Diabetes | Prevention

Its great that you fit vegetables into your dietthey provide a healthy blend of nutrients, and a new study found that antioxidants found in produce could help reduce type 2 diabetes risk. However, its best not to pair starchy vegetables with other carbohydrate-rich foods. (Think: rice with sweet potatoes). While too much starch doesnt directly raise your risk of diabetes, it can contribute to weight gain and blood sugar spikes, both of which could up your risk. As with any food, moderation is key. MORE: 7 Sneaky Signs You May Develop DiabetesAnd How To Stay Healthy Many people dont consider vegetables like sweet potatoes, corn, and peas to be sources of starch, says Jenifer Bowman, RD, a dietitian at UCHealth in Fort Collins, Colorado. But if youre trying to regulate your blood sugar, you need to be aware of overall carbohydrate content. To make sure every meal is a balanced one, fill half your plate with non-starchy produce like leafy greens, then fill the rest with equal parts protein and grains or starchy vegetables. (So, quinoaorcornnot both.) It may seem like a healthy snack, but dried fruits can cause blood sugar spikes, and dont ward off hunger like their fresh counterparts. If you eat a whole apricot, youll probably feel somewhat full from just one fruit, says Fatima Cody Stanford, MD, an obesity medicine physician at Massachusetts General Hospital Weight Center. However, if youre eating dried apricot, you probably have to eat quite a few of them for the same effect. This means youre consuming a ton more sugarwithout the fiber that will blunt its effects on your blood sugar. When we dry food, we take away a lot of the fibrous content that promotes satiety and helps to regulate blood sugar, Stanford explains. The occasional dried fruit snack wont hurt you, but S Continue reading >>

Can A Poor Diet Cause Diabetes?

Can A Poor Diet Cause Diabetes?

There are two different types of diabetes: type-1 and type-2. While the exact cause of type-1 diabetes is unknown, research has shown that poor diet and a lack of exercise are key factors in the development of type-2 diabetes. To avoid type-2 diabetes, consume a diet low in fast foods, trans fats, saturated fats, sugars and processed foods. Video of the Day Type-2 Diabetes About 95 percent of those affected with diabetes have type-2 diabetes, a slow-developing disease that can occur at any age. People with either type-1 or type-2 diabetes have excess glucose, or blood sugar, in their blood that is not removed by the hormone known as insulin. In type-2 diabetics, an insulin resistance develops, and fat, liver and muscle cells no longer respond correctly to insulin. Symptoms of type-2 diabetes can include fatigue, hunger, increased thirst, blurred vision, erectile dysfunction, increased urination and slower healing. MedlinePlus notes that most people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes are overweight because excess fat makes it more difficult for the body to correctly utilize insulin. Several studies have shown that fast-food consumption can further the development of type-2 diabetes. A 2013 study published in the "European Journal of Nutrition" set out to clarify the role of dietary patterns in the onset of type-2 diabetes in overweight people. The study found that diets high in soft drinks and french fries, and low in fruit and vegetables, were associated with a greater risk of type-2 diabetes in overweight participants, particularly among those who are less physically active. A 2005 study published in "Lancet" concluded that fast-food consumption has a strong positive correlation with weight gain and insulin resistance, implying that fast-food intake may promote obesity and Continue reading >>

10 Bad Habits That Raise Your Diabetes Risk

10 Bad Habits That Raise Your Diabetes Risk

1 / 11 Bad Habits That Raise Your Diabetes Risk As you pick up your morning coffee en route to work, you contemplate a glossy iced donut in the display case. You know it’s not good for you, but you deserve a treat, right? But before you make a grab for those tempting baked goods, consider this: These seemingly harmless everyday diet decisions aren’t linked just to the obesity epidemic in the United States, but also to the worldwide rise in type 2 diabetes. It’s time to ditch some bad everyday habits — before a diabetes diagnosis forces you to. This isn’t just idle advice, either. A British study of nearly 4,000 people found that such lifestyle fixes were key to stabilizing blood sugar and reversing metabolic syndrome, a condition that leads to diabetes. So what are you waiting for? Here are some important changes you can make to trim your waistline and cut your diabetes risk. Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. The notion is understandable. Blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, so a common idea has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. However, the major diabetes organizations take a different view. The American Diabetes Association1 and Diabetes UK2 have labelled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center,3 which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Here is what you need to know: Sugar Is the Body’s Fuel The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort glucose into the cells. What causes insulin resistance? It appears to be caused by an accumulation of microscopic fat particles within muscle and Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ongoing. Most doctors argue that sugar alone does not trigger diabetes. But some emerging research suggests a closer link between sugar consumption and diabetes than was previously thought. Can people get diabetes from eating too much sugar? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body's ability to regulate blood glucose levels. But eating sugar will not cause type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which causes the body to attack cells that produce insulin. Damage to these cells undermines the body's ability to manage blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes is more complex. Sugar consumption will not directly cause diabetes. However, excess sugar consumption can cause weight gain. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, eating too much sugar can make symptoms worse, since diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood sugar levels. Understanding the link between sugar and diabetes Although eating sugar is not directly linked to developing diabetes, some evidence suggests that increased overall availability of sugar makes diabetes more common. A 2013 study that looked at 175 different countries found that more sugar in the food supply increased diabetes rates. Specifically, for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person, diabetes levels rose 1 percent. This change continued even when researchers con Continue reading >>

Can My Eating Habits Cause Diabetes?

Can My Eating Habits Cause Diabetes?

If there were a magic pill, completely eliminating your risk of developing diabetes, would you take it? If you could guarantee your health would never deteriorate, would you be interested in hearing more? Truth is, we cannot change our genetics or certain risk factors, such as ethnicity. But, there are some risk factors you can take charge over. You can be in control of many habits, some of which contribute to chronic diseases. Eating specific foods does not automatically cause diabetes. One high-sugar snack or one high-fat meal does not result in diabetes. Rather, it’s lifestyle and lifelong habits and trends that increase the potential of developing diabetes. Here are some tips to reduce your risk through eating more healthfully. Maintain a Healthy Weight Obesity and overweight are directly associated with type 2 diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that in the United States, one-third of adults and 17% of youth are classified obese (BMI > 30). The trend continues to climb every year. The epidemic of pediatric obesity contributes to the increased incidence of children developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing weight only 5% can reduce risk of developing diabetes dramatically. Keeping weight at a healthy level is key in avoiding diabetes. Move Your Body We have become a society of screens. Computers, laptops, tablets, e-readers, video games, television…. Everywhere you turn, adults and teens and children are staring at a screen of some sort. Long gone are the days where after school time involved riding bikes, climbing trees and playing in the park. To achieve the full benefit of physical activity, marathon running is not required. Simple morning walks, after-dinner bike rides or weekend hikes improve metabolism and burn calories. Incorporating moveme Continue reading >>

Can The 'banting' Diet Cause Diabetes?

Can The 'banting' Diet Cause Diabetes?

It is generally agreed that type 2 diabetics should eat better and exercise more. What is controversial, however, is which diet is best low carb or vegetarian. Currently around seven percent of the worlds population have diabetes and the numbers are rising. Apart from the devastating health consequences of this disease it places a heavy burden on the healthcare systems and economies of many countries. In type 1 diabetes the pancreas eventually stops producing insulin altogether and insulin needs to be provided from external sources. Gestational diabetes is a (mostly) temporary condition of high blood sugar that happens during pregnancy. By far the most prevalent form of diabetes worldwide is type 2 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes the pancreas does produce insulin, which is however not utilised properly by the body and causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called insulin resistance. Diabetes is nothing new and the first description of the disease was by the ancient Greek doctor Aretaeus of Cappadocia in the first century AD. He regarded diabetes as incurable and described life with diabetes as short, disgusting and painful. The condition was, however, not nearly as prevalent as in modern times and the physician Galen (130 200 AD) reported that he had only seen two cases of diabetes in the Roman Empire during the course of his career. Read: Have you been diagnosed with diabetes? Our lifestyles have changed dramatically over the last two thousand years, and from a health perspective, mainly in terms of food and exercise. Our ancestors often struggled to get enough food and didnt have things like sugar, refined carbohydrates and processed foods. They also didnt have cars and public transport and agriculture wasnt mechanised, which meant that everyday living involve Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. Because blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, a common notion has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. The American Diabetes Association and Diabetes UK have labeled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center, which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Sugar can play an aiding and abetting role in diabetes, but the idea that “eating sugar causes diabetes” is simplistic and interferes with efforts to help the public understand the actual causes of the disease and how to protect themselves and their families. Here is what you need to know: The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it, you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diets Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

Low-carb Diets Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

Fad diets are clearly not all they are cracked up to be. Most are simply made up of theories that seldom get put to the test other than with the anecdotal evidence of users who swear by them. When put to the test of time, however, they fail those who use them and when carefully scrutinized by scientists and researchers they collapse under the weight of the evidence. Low-Carb diets are the prototype for this. They’ve been around for well over 100 years in one form or another, with the most popular version being marketed by Dr. Atkins over the last 40 years. People do lose weight, but not for the reasons put forth by those who champion such plans. The weight loss comes partly from eating fewer calories and partly because in this day and age, eliminating carbohydrates means eliminating calorie dense, highly processed foods (most of which contain high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)). I can’t imagine why anyone would follow a diet — any diet — that takes entire food groups away from you. There’s no reason to give up great foods like pasta, potatoes, beans and corn to lose weight or to be healthier. Giving up these foods is one of the main reasons that the Atkins diet is not a diet that can be sustained for the long term. Further, such diets seldom prepare people for eating real food: when they go off the diet they usually gain the weight back, and then some. There’s been concern for years about the long term health risks of such diets. We’ve seen that those eating higher protein diets that are also high in saturated fat were more likely to develop heart disease than those whose higher protein diet came from vegetable protein sources. Interestingly, those women eating a strict low-carbohydrate diet weighed more than those eating a more normal diet.(1) Their Body Mas Continue reading >>

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