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Can Diabetics Donate Platelets

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

20 Books People with Diabetes Should Read Your diabetes should be under controlled before you donate blood To donate blood with diabetes, your blood sugar needs to be in your target range . Your A1C should be less than 7%, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. If your blood sugars and diabetes are not well controlled, you shouldnt donate blood. Its up to you to let the Red Cross know. If you are unsure about the condition of your diabetes, discuss your concerns with your healthcare provider. They will be able to help you decide if giving blood is a good idea, or if you should wait until your diabetes is better managed. You should be in good overall health before you donate blood with diabetes Besides having your blood sugars in control, you should also have other conditions under control. For example, your blood pressure should be less than 180/100 mmHg to give blood, which is higher than 140/90 mmHg that is the recommended blood pressure for people with diabetes. Conversely, if your blood pressure is less than 90/50 mmHg, you wont be able to donate blood. Besides diabetes, they will also ask you about other conditions, and medications which you may be taking. Diabetes medications generally wont keep you from giving blood in the US, but there is a Red Cross list of other medications that shouldnt be taken if you are donating blood, including blood thinners. The Red Cross representative will screen you for conditions and medications which may affect your ability to donate blood with diabetes and related health conditions. Another thing to know is that if you plan to donate platelets, you should not take aspirin or blood thinners for several days prior to your donation. 1 If you have heart complications from your diabetes, there are some things that you ne Continue reading >>

Nhsbt - Who Can Donate Blood Platelets

Nhsbt - Who Can Donate Blood Platelets

You can become a platelet donor if you are generally in good health Aged 17 to 65 (if you have not donated before) If you are over 65 and have given blood before Or if you are over 70 you must have given a full donation in the last 2 years You do not have to have given blood before - you need to give a small sample of blood to determine if you have a high enough platelet count. Your sample is assessed which takes a couple of weeks, during which time we can determine your blood group. We will also need to know your gender, height and weight to see if you have a large enough blood volume to give 2 transfusions of platelets. Currently we are particularly looking to boost our recruitment of A negative group donors as their donations can be given to patients with blood groups other than their own. We look forward to welcoming you as a donor, whether is it giving platelets or whole blood - both of which help to save lives. Hopefully, this website has explained the urgent need for platelets, as well as the issues we face about the location and eligibility of people who can donate. If you think platelet donation is for you, please give us a call, and we'll answer any questions you have. We'll take your details, and the next step will be for your local centre's Platelet Donor Manager to contact you and arrange a visit to see if platelet donation is for you. Hopefully, this video has explained the urgent need for platelets, as well as about the location and eligibility of people who can donate. If you think platelet donation is for you, please register your interest online or call us on 0300 123 23 23, and we'll answer any questions you have. Once we have your details, we can arrange an appointment to see if platelet donation is suitable for you. We would like to emphasise again Continue reading >>

Blood And Platelet Donation Qualifications

Blood And Platelet Donation Qualifications

Blood and Platelet Donation Qualifications To ensure the safety of patients and donors, certain qualifications must be met before making a donation. Please note that units of blood and platelets collected at City of Hope are used only for City of Hope patients. We do not transfer or sell any blood products to other hospitals. To make an appointment online, go to: www.iDonateBlood4Hope.org If you would like to donate, you must be at least 17 years of age and weight at least 110 lbs. Donors age 16 may donate if they weigh a minimum of 120 lbs. and have a signed City of Hope Donor Center Parental Consent. All donors must possess a government issued picture ID (e.g., a driver's license, passport, etc.). We also encourage you to have a healthy meal and be well hydrated (with non-caffeinated fluids) before donating. Please note for platelet pheresis donors only: Do not take any ibuprofen, aspirin or aspirin-containing products 48 hours before your donation. Directed donors must present the following information at the time of donation: the patient's name (as registered in the hospital), date of birth and/or medical record number. A donor's blood type cannot be determined before donation. If the donors blood passes all tests, but is not the same blood type, it will automatically be released for use by other patients. There is no credit system for directed units donated at local hospitals or any other collection agency. Have had cold or flu symptoms three days prior to donation or do not feel well on day of donation Have taken antibiotics in the last two days Had major dental work (crown, root canal, gum surgery) in the past 24 hours Have a history of cancer (except basal cell skin or in situ cancers) Had a tattoo, ear or skin piercing at a regulated facility in the last two w Continue reading >>

Giving Blood | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Giving Blood | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Are type 1 diabetics allowed to give blood as i always used to? viewtopic.php?f=1&t=14727&p=134725&hilit=blood+donors#p134725 You can get further information about this and other issues by contacting the special national blood donor helpline on 0300 123 23 23 (local call rates), open 24 hours a day. Sadly, no, you can't give blood (or plasma) if you have type 1 diabetes. That was one of the things that upset me most when diagnosed. However, I have managed to pursuade a few friends to donate blood to replace me as a former donor. As above, no, we can't. Although I would be interested to know if anyone knows the reason why? I was told that " I needed my blood more than they did" but can't work this out. I can imagine why they might not want it....but not why it would harm me, if I was otherwise healthy. It doesn't matter what type you are. If you're on insulin you can't give blood, if you aren't on insulin then you can. I'm afraid it's not quite so 'simples'........ Diabetic's are not excluded from giving blood simply because they have Diabetes. The UK Blood Services Standing Advisory Committee on Care and Selection of Donors has concluded that blood donation is safe for people with Diabetes who manage their condition by taking tablets and have no complications or other underlying medical conditions. Always best to check with the Agency first by phoning the number Sue gave in her post. There are MANY other reasons why a Diabetic may not give blood, especially if there are other conditions. Diabetic's are not excluded from giving blood simply because they have Diabetes. Glad to hear that, I was thinking of giving blood at the end of the month - we have a Continue reading >>

Who Can Donate Blood?

Who Can Donate Blood?

Anyone diagnosed with Babesiosis isnot eligibleto donate. Anyone withthe following types of cancermay donate:SquamousorBasal Cell Carcinomaof the skin, and those withMelanoma may be eligibleafter evaluation by our Medical Director. Persons with other forms of cancermay donate one (1) yearafter recovery. Individuals with Blood Cancer(leukemia or lymphoma) are not eligible to donate. Any individual who has tested positive for Chagas Disease isnot eligibleto donate blood. Potential donors with Diabetes are eligible, as long as it is controlled with oral medication. Those who have taken bovine insulin are not eligible to donate. Persons receiving electrolysis or acupuncture treatmentare eligibleto donate. Anyone who has lived with, or had sexual contact with a person with Hepatitis ,may not donate. Those with heart or lung disease who have symptoms or activity restrictionsshould not donate. However, youmay be eligible if you have recovered from cardiac, pulmonary (lung) or vascular surgery, and have no physical restrictions. Medical clearance from your physician may be required. Any individual who has HIV/AIDS ,or has tested positivefor HIV/AIDS,is not eligibleto donate blood. Potential donors who have had sexual contact in the past 12 months with anyone who has HIV/AIDS, or has had a positive test for the HIV/AIDS, virusisdeferred for 366 daysfrom the date of last sexual contact. Anyone who has used needles to take drugs, steroids, or anythingNOTprescribed by a doctor, even once,is not eligible. Potential donors who have been diagnosed with Lyme Disease areeligible to donate 30 days after diagnosis, and after they have completed antibiotic treatment. Persons taking antibiotics areeligible to donatethe day afterthe last dose, if recovered from the condition for which it wa Continue reading >>

Blood Bank Of Delmarva : Donation Info & Requirements

Blood Bank Of Delmarva : Donation Info & Requirements

Blood Bank of Delmarva has donation sites conveniently located throughout the Delmarva Peninsula. To find the closest donation center or mobile blood drive, click here . To schedule an appointment to donate blood, please call (302) 737-8400 or (888) 8-BLOOD-8 or click here . Giving whole blood takes about 5-7 minutes. The entire donation appointment, including a mini-physical (blood pressure, temperature and pulse), medical history review, and post-donation refreshments takes about an hour. Giving blood is fast, easy, and safe. You cannot contract AIDS or any infectious disease by donating blood. Give Platelets or a Double Red Cell Donation! Platelets are critically needed for cancer and leukemia patients and only have a shelf life of 5 days. Double red cell donations can save twice the lives in just one visit. Find out more! Anyone who is between the ages of 17 and 79 years old(Ages 80 and older, please contact Blood Bank of Delmarva Eligibility Coordinator at 1 888 8-BLOOD-8 for medical approval), weighs at least 110 pounds, is in general good health, and meets the minimum eligibility requirements may give blood as often as every 56 days. All donors must provide a photo ID or two other forms of identification, including date of birth. Note: By law, students 17-years or older are not required to have parental consent to give blood ( click here and read section 709 for more information on the law). The school hosting the drive can choose to require parental permission, but it would be the responsibility of the schools to obtain those permissions. Whole blood donors can donate approximately every two months (56 days). Platelet donors (plateletpheresis) can donate approximately every two weeks (14 days). Donors are eligible to give platelets if they have a height, weight Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration does not have any regulatory restrictions against diabetics donating blood other than if the individual has received bovine source insulin since 1980. The concern here is not the diabetes but rather the bovine spongiform encephalopathy. As bovine source insulins were not widely available in the US, the diabetic would have had to specifically import it from Europe. (Of note, the FDA regulations require that is the donor answers that they are not certain whether they received bovine source insulin, they are deferred. Many donors answer "I do not know" and are therefore deferred when in reality they have not been exposed as it was not available in the US.) Donors may mistake this deferral as being due to their having diabetes. Here is the FDA guidance (Each blood collection center in the US can have criteria more stringent that either the FDA and AABB so there is some variability among blood centers. At the collection center where I work, we allow donors with diabetes, whether controlled with diet, oral hypoglycemics, or insulin, to donate. The only instance where I can think where diabetes would have a negative affect on blood product and therefore an adverse effect on the patient would be in the rare instances where we collect granulocytes. If the donor had poor glucose control, this could impair neutrophil function. Since granulocyte donors are usually stimulated with corticosteroids, which would worsen glucose control, diabetics are deferred from granulocyte donation at my institution so this is not an issue. Continue reading >>

Blood Donation Eligibility Requirements | American Red Cross

Blood Donation Eligibility Requirements | American Red Cross

This page uses Javascript. Your browser either doesn't support Javascript or you have it turned off. This list is not complete. Specially trained technical staff are available at each blood collection center and details of each donor's health and activities are discussed in a confidential setting prior to blood donation. The majority of donor eligibility rules are specified by the Food and Drug Administration for every collection center in the country. Other rules are determined by the medical professionals at specific blood centers, or with other regulatory bodies. Therefore, these rules may differ between programs. Donor eligibility rules are intended to protect the health and safety of the donor as well as the patient who will receive the transfusion. The criteria listed below are provided as guidelines to assist you in determining whether you may be eligible to be a blood donor. The final determination of eligibility is made at the time of donation. The guidelines listed below were last revised on 08/31/09. There may have been some changes to these criteria since the last revision date. The most up to date eligibility information can be obtained by contacting the American Red Cross blood donation center nearest you. To ensure the safety of blood donation for both donors and recipients, all volunteer blood donors must be evaluated to determine their eligibility to give blood. The final determination will be made on the day of the donation at the blood drive or blood donation center. If you were deferred from donating in the past, you may be able to donate again. The Red Cross recommends that females wait until the age of 19 or older to donate power reds. Please note higher requirements may apply in certain cases. Check with your donor center to confirm. Other aspect Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Give Blood?

Can People With Diabetes Give Blood?

Tweet When it comes to giving blood, there are a number of conditions that can make you ineligible. Unfortunately, people with diabetes won't, in most cases, be eligible to give blood. At least, not in the UK. This is because NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) maintain a policy of refusing blood donations from anybody who may be placed at risk by giving blood. In many cases, this includes people with diabetes. Prediabetes and giving blood People who have been diagnosed with prediabetes are eligible to give blood, as long as they haven't had any heart problems. Insulin and blood donation People who take insulin are not allowed to give blood, which excludes both people with type 1 diabetes and people with type 2 diabetes who are insulin-dependent. The affect of blood donations on insulin levels is considered a risk to the donor's health. Because of this, people who are dependent on insulin are not permitted to give blood. This applies to both regular insulin injections and insulin pump therapy. Diabetes medication and giving blood People who take diabetes medication can give blood, as long as their medication hasn't changed in the last four weeks. Medication changes include changes in dosage, as well as the type of medication taken. If your medication has changed recently, the effect on your blood glucose means that your health would be at risk should you give blood. Diabetes, the heart, and giving blood People with diabetes who have experienced heart problems are, in most cases, ineligible to give blood. This includes people who have: Experienced faintness or giddiness as a result of heart problems Experienced heart failure Had surgery for blocked or narrowed arteries (including amputation) Conditions for giving blood There are a number of conditions that may prevent you f Continue reading >>

35 Fascinating (or Not) Blood Donation Facts And Practical Info

35 Fascinating (or Not) Blood Donation Facts And Practical Info

Why? Donating blood might cause an interruption of your blood glucose control and lead to a hypoglycemic reaction. A diabetic person that doesnt take insulin and is in good health condition can donate blood if he or she meets certain criteria. You should not have complications such as eye, kidney or blood vessel related problems. In US you have to wait for 56 days before being able to donate blood again in case of whole blood donation and 112 days before donating double red cell. Platelets can be donated every 7 days, but no more than 24 times a year. This is the most common type of blood donation. You will give a pint of blood (450 mls) that will be separated into transfuzable elements like red cells, plasma and platelets. Normally, with a single donation you will be able to help 3 different people. 5. What does donating double red cell mean? Only the red cells will be taken from your body with the help of aapheresis machine and the rest of the components of blood will be returned to your organism. This process will last about 30 minutes. In this process only the plasma is collected by a special machine, while the others components of blood are returned to your body. The necessary time to complete this is about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Only platelets and some plasma are collected, the rest of the blood being returned back to donor. This process can last from one and a half to two and a half hours. 8. Who can donate blood and what are donating blood restrictions? As a general rule, donors must be at least 17 years old, weigh at least 110 pounds and be in good health condition. Additional rules and restrictions are in place and the staff at the blood giving facility willgive you more information. 9. What is the minimum weight to donate blood? 11. How to prepare to donate Continue reading >>

Can I Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Donating blood is a selfless way to help others. Blood donations help people who need transfusions for many types of medical conditions, and you may decide to donate blood for a variety of reasons. A pint of donated blood may help up to three people. Although you’re allowed donate blood if you have diabetes, there are a few requirements that you’ll need to meet. If you have diabetes and want to donate blood, it’s generally safe for you to do so. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are eligible to give blood donations. You should have your condition under control and be in otherwise good health before you donate blood. Having your diabetes under control means that you maintain healthy blood sugar levels. This requires you to be vigilant about your diabetes on a daily basis. You need to be aware of your blood sugar levels throughout each day and make sure you eat a proper diet and exercise sufficiently. Living a healthy lifestyle will contribute to keeping your blood sugar levels in a healthy range. Your doctor may also prescribe certain medications to help manage your diabetes. These medications shouldn’t impact your ability to donate blood. If you want to donate blood but are concerned about your diabetes, talk to your doctor before your donation. They can answer any questions you may have and help you determine whether this is the best option for you. Health screening Blood donation centers have a screening process that requires you to disclose any preexisting health conditions. It’s also a time where a certified Red Cross professional will evaluate you and measure your basic vital statistics, such as your temperature, pulse, and blood pressure. They will take a small blood sample (likely from a finger prick) to determine your hemoglobin levels as well. If Continue reading >>

Donate Blood, Platelets, Plasma?

Donate Blood, Platelets, Plasma?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What do you know about diabetics donating blood, platelets, or plasma? What do you know about diabetics donating blood, platelets, or plasma? I only know that I've got an appointment at 9:30 tomorrow morning to donate a pint of whole blood. The blood center called me the day after I was eligible to donate again (last time was in July) and I wasn't going to say no. depends what country you are in. In the Uk people with diabetes controlled by anythign other than diet are not allowed to donate blood/blood products, or bone marrow. which sucks... i dont see why, it's not like anyone's gonna catch it!? I was told even people controlling it with a diet would be lucky to give blood. When i spoke to the advisors on the phone they said it was to protect people with diabetes, rather than protect people from us! I just visited the red cross (dot org) website and checked out their guidelines (BLOOD DONATION ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES) and I quote: To give blood for transfusion to another person, you must be healthy, be at least 17 years old or 16 years old if allowed by state law, weigh at least 110 pounds, and not have donated blood in the last 8 weeks (56 days). "Healthy" means that you feel well and can perform normal activities. If you have a chronic condition such as diabetes or high blood pressure, "healthy" also means that you are being treated and the condition is under control. " In almost all cases, medications will not disqualify you as a blood donor. Your eligibility will be based on the reason that the medication was prescribed. As long as the condition is under control and you are healthy, bloo Continue reading >>

Donor Eligibility | Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Donor Eligibility | Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

The following is general donation criteria. This is not a complete list. The information below serves only as a guideline to donor eligibility. Please contact The Donor Center at Roswell Park at 716-845-8275 if you have any questions. If you plan to schedule a plateletdonation and have not donated at the Donor Center since mid-July 2016 have a history of pregnancy, please contact the Donor Center before scheduling your appointment online. Recent regulatory requirements have resulted in a change to the eligibility criteria for some female platelet donors, and we would like the opportunity to speak with you over the phone before scheduling your appointment. Please call (716) 845-8275 Must be in general good health (not experiencing any active cold or flu symptoms, headaches, cold sore or infections at time of donation) Must not have donated whole blood within the last 56 days. *Please be sure to eat a substantial meal before your donation. Antibiotics: A donor with an infection may not be eligible to donate. Reason for antibiotic use must be assessed and a deferral period may be necessary after completing an antibiotic medication. Aspirin: Acceptable for whole blood donations. A platelet donor must wait 72 hours from the date of their last dose of aspirin or medications containing aspirin. (Please consult with your physician before discontinuing aspirin that has been medically prescribed). Blood Pressure: Acceptable limits are: Systolic (first number) 180 or below and diastolic (second number) 100 or below at the time of donation. Most blood pressure medications are acceptable. Surgery-please alert the collections specialist to any surgeries you have had that are less than 12 months from the date of your donation (including dental surgeries). A deferral period may or may Continue reading >>

Platelet Donation (pheresis)

Platelet Donation (pheresis)

What are your platelets used for and why are they important? Platelets are cells produced in the bone marrow that are needed to prevent bleeding. Donation of these cells is important, as certain patients need transfusions of only platelets to survive. Although a single whole blood donation does yield about one tablespoon of platelets, eight to ten times that amount is needed for one platelet transfusion. Platelets are a very precious component of blood. Donations are needed frequently as these cells only have a shelf life of five days. To help keep the supply up, donors can safely give as frequently as every two weeks. Step 1: Call the donor recruiter at 314-362-1253 to schedule an appointment. Step 2: Come to the Pheresis Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Be sure to bring a photo ID. Step 3: A registered nurse will ask you confidential qualifying questions and will conduct a complete medical screening. Your temperature, pulse and blood pressure will be taken along with one tube of blood for analysis. If your hemoglobin (iron-rich cells) and platelet count are high enough, you will be moved to the donation area. Step 4: Donating is safe, simple and relaxing. For the next 90 minutes, sit back in the cushy chair and put your feet up while the pheresis machine does all of the work. During the time it takes to complete your donation, you can read, watch television, use your computer and even make phone calls. The nurses in the Pheresis Center also can provide you with refreshments at your request. The donation: One sterile single-use needle is used in the donation process, through which whole blood leaves your body. Some of the platelets are removed, and then the blood is returned to your body. An anticoagulant will flow through the sterile tubing attached to the needle, s Continue reading >>

United Blood Services | Learn More About Blood Donation & Blood Donor Requirements

United Blood Services | Learn More About Blood Donation & Blood Donor Requirements

Blood is a liquid that circulates through the body via a pathway of blood vessels, arteries and veins, carrying nutrients, oxygen, antibodies and other necessities of life to every cell and tissue throughout the entire body. Blood is also the means by which waste and waste byproducts are removed from the cells. Think of the circulatory system as a transportation system consisting of vehicles, roads and highways, similar to how we move goods and products throughout the world! Of course, we dont have little vehicles speeding through our veins, so how does blood do this? Whole blood is made up of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets, all which are suspended in a fluid called plasma. Each of these components of our blood has a very specific and important job. Red blood cells contain hemoglobin, a type of protein that gives blood its red color, and are primarily responsible for carrying fresh oxygen throughout the body while removing spent carbon dioxide from the cells. White blood cells are very important to our immune system; they protect us from foreign invaders such as bacteria, viruses and fungi. Platelets are the smallest-sized components in whole blood, but they are mighty in importance. They are responsible for blood clotting, which helps stop bleeding should we suffer from a cut or other trauma to the circulatory system. Plasma is the fluid protein and salt solution in which the red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets are suspended. Plasma is 90 percent water and also contains several proteins that aid in blood clotting and the creation of antibodies. It is vital in providing blood volume, hydration, and mineral exchanges throughout the body, which are critical for proper cell function. A whole blood donation can be separated into its different Continue reading >>

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