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Can Diabetics Donate Organs After Death

Kendsie Hunter: Can Diabetics Donate Blood, Organs Or Plasma?

Kendsie Hunter: Can Diabetics Donate Blood, Organs Or Plasma?

Kendsie Hunter: Can Diabetics Donate Blood, Organs or Plasma? Being the people person that I am, I am always looking for a way to help others. However, when my friends recently went off to donate blood for a volunteer hour, I second-guessed my ability to help others. I know that I can volunteer in different ways, but it got me thinking: Ive just always assumed that because I have diabetes I am not able to donate blood, organs or plasma, but is there any truth to this way of thinking? I asked a Certified Diabetes Educator (CED, at my doctors office recently, and she told me that it depends on the situation. Yes, diabetics can donate blood. For organs, there are specific and individual guidelines. And yes, diabetics can donate plasma. The main reason behind not being able to donate blood is due to the scare of low blood sugar. There is nothing wrong with diabetic blood that renders it useless, but there are other factors that go into the decisions made by blood donation organizations. For those non-diabetic readers: the nurses always give you cookies and juice after you donate blood. Do you know why? It is to keep your blood sugar stable after such a large amount of blood loss. The organizations have enough issues dealing with non-diabetics who may faint or feel woozy after giving blood, so having a diabetic there with a low blood sugar is a liability. So, if you want to donate blood, there are certain criteria that you may have to meet (check with the blood bank to which you are planning to donate). (However, it is a different story for organs. Diabetics cannot donate organs while living. One of the reasons is the fact that as diabetics live longer, the disease in one way or another affects their organs. For example, kidney and heart disease are common among diabetics, Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions About Organ Donation

Frequently Asked Questions About Organ Donation

You are here: Home / Health / Conditions / Frequently Asked Questions About Organ Donation Frequently Asked Questions About Organ Donation Readers Digest interviewed two experts to get answers to some common questions people have when they're considering registering as an organ donor. Dr. Stephen Beed is Director of Critical Care at the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre in Halifax and an associate professor of anesthesia and medicine at Dalhousie University. Dr. Christopher Doig is an adult critical-care physician for the Calgary Health Region. He is also a bio-ethicist and advisor to the Alberta Advisory Committee on Organ and Tissue Donation and Transplantation. RD: If medical authorities know that someone is an organ donor, would his or her medical care ever be compromised prior to removal of an organ? Beed: Absolutely never. The health care team is focused on addressing whatever reversible medical conditions there could possibly be. Even in cases where we know that somebody will do very poorly, it doesnt stop us from doing everything possible. If a family has been told that the prognosis is dismal, and they come to me to talk about organ and tissue donation, I try to defer it and say that we can talk about it if we get to that point. Organ transplant teams arent involved in providing direct care to the patient. RD: What steps do medical specialists take to be sure someone is irreversibly brain dead and not simply in a coma from which they could wake up? Beed: There is a very specific set of clinical requirements to be declared brain dead. In brain death, there is no evidence of function both in the higher structures of the brain (involved in talking, thinking) and in the brain stem, where many of the autonomic functions are handled. Not only is the patient Continue reading >>

Can I Give Blood, Even Though I Have Diabetes?

Can I Give Blood, Even Though I Have Diabetes?

I am 42 years old, and I have diabetes. Can I donate blood or become an organ donor? — Annette, New Jersey How wonderful it is that you are thinking about donating blood or an organ. It is a constant struggle for the blood banks and transplant centers to maintain an adequate supply. The answer to your question is not the same for both organ and blood donation, so I will first address blood donation. Yes, you can donate blood, if you meet the following criteria: Your sugar level is controlled. You are in good health. Your blood pressure is below 180/100. You are not anemic (low red blood cells). The blood banks usually check for donor eligibility through a series of other questions and tests, so keep in mind that you might still be disqualified. For example, if you have received bovine (beef) insulin since 1980, you may not be eligible to donate. That's because some bovine insulin was made from cattle in the United Kingdom and might carry Creutzfeldt-Jakob (or "mad cow") disease. If you are eligible to donate, make sure you have an adequate meal, drink extra fluids to replace the volume being removed, and stay away from caffeinated beverages on the day of your donation. Around that date, it's important to eat iron-rich foods (such as spinach, kale, and lean red meat). And as always, stay away from fatty foods, which might affect some of the tests done to determine eligibility. Regarding organ donation, let me give you some general information. There are various organs and tissues in the human body that can be transplanted to save lives or cure illnesses. The heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, liver, and intestines can be donated. Besides organs, we can donate tissues such as skin, cartilage, tendons, corneas, veins, and heart valves. The donation of an organ can be life Continue reading >>

Can You Donate Blood Or Organs With Diabetes? | Ask D'mine

Can You Donate Blood Or Organs With Diabetes? | Ask D'mine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Hey, All -- if you've got questions about life with diabetes, then you've come to the right place! That would be our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and clinical specialist W il Dubois . Many of us in our D-Community may wonder whether we can donate blood and organs, given that our bodies are not technically "healthy." Wil has some important insight on both types of donations... so read on. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected] } Tom,type 2 from West Virginia, asks: Canpeople with diabetes give blood? [email protected] answers: Generally, yes. Unless you are a personwith diabetes who also happens to have HIV or AIDS. Or leukemia. Orhemochromatosis. Or have had hepatitis since the age of 11. Or spent morethan three months on the Isle of Man between Jan. 1, 1980, andDec. 31, 1996. Theyre also not interested in your diabetic blood if youvebeen treated for syphilis or gonorrhea in the last 11 months. But its OK ifits been more than a year since your last bout of the clap. There are alsosome restrictions on meds like blood thinners and some vaccines. Oh, and if youever took the old bovine insulin made in the UK after 1980, you arenteligible. If you did take bovine insulin in that time window, I have no ideahow youd know where it was made. Why the ban? Theyre worried about madcow disease . (Thats also why they take a dim view of long vacations onthe Isle of Man.) Oh, and speaking of men, I guess we need to talk about MSM,which stands for men who have had sex with men. In the past, MSMers were notwelcome, but starting in 2015 the FDA changed its no queers Continue reading >>

About Donation | Organ And Tissue Authority

About Donation | Organ And Tissue Authority

There are many ways that you can get involved and raise awareness within your community, your workplace or your family about the life-transforming benefits of organ and tissue donation. If youre looking for information and resources about organ and tissue donation and transplantation, start your search here for some of the great resources we have available. Who can become an organ and tissue donor? Almost everyone can help others through organ and tissue donation. The governing factors are where and how a donor dies and the condition of their organs and tissues. While your age and medical history will be considered, you shouldn't assume you're too young, too old or not healthy enough to become a donor. All major religions support organ and tissue donation for transplantation. Older Australians and people with chronic health conditions can be donors. Only a few medical conditions preclude donation of organs. People can also donate a kidney or part of their liver while they are still alive, though this is usually restricted to those wanting to transform the life of someone they know. A donor's gift and a patient's hopes are in good hands. Australia has a world class reputation for successful transplant outcomes. It is important to know that in Australia the family of every potential donor will be asked toconfirm the donation decision of their loved one before organ and tissue donation for transplantation can proceed. Some families have discussed organ and tissue donation and may already know their loved one's donation decisions. Other families who have not discussed donation will also need to make a decision about whether their loved one will becomes a donor. Which organs and tissues can be donated for transplantation? Organ and tissue donations can save and significantl Continue reading >>

Organ Donation Facts

Organ Donation Facts

Here are a few questions you might be asking if you're considering organ donation: Just about anyone, at any age, can become an organ donor. Anyone younger than age18 needs to have the consent of a parent or guardian. For organ donation after death, a medical assessment will be done to determine what organs can be donated. Certain conditions, such as having HIV , actively spreading cancer , or severe infection would exclude organ donation. Having a serious condition like cancer , HIV , diabetes , kidney disease , or heart disease can prevent you from donating as a living donor. Let your transplant team know about any health conditions you have at the beginning of the process. Then they can decide whether you're a good candidate. Do my blood and tissue type have to match the recipient's? It's easier to transplant an organ if the donor and recipient are a good match. The transplant team will put you through a series of tests to determine whether your blood and tissue types are compatible with the recipient's. Some medical centers can transplant an organ even if the donor's and recipient's blood and tissue types don't match. In that case, the recipient will receive special treatments to prevent his or her body from rejecting the donor organ. To donate your organs after death, you can either register with your state's donor registry (visit OrganDonor.gov), or fill out an organ donor card when you get or renew your driver's license. To become a living donor, you can either work directly with your family member or friend's transplant team, or contact a transplant center in your area to find out who's in need of an organ. If I donate an organ, will I have health problems in the future? Not necessarily. There are some organs you can give up all or part of without having long-t Continue reading >>

The Gift Of A Lifetime: Questions And Myths About Donation

The Gift Of A Lifetime: Questions And Myths About Donation

Home | Understanding Donation | Questions and Myths About Donation There are numerous questions people have about organ and tissue donation and transplantation. What follows are a few of the most commonly asked questions. What is the age limit for organ and tissue donation? Potential to donate, regardless of age, will be determined at the time of death. People in their 80s have donated vital organs that have been successfully transplanted. No matter what your age is be sure to inform family members of your decision to be a donor. If I have a serious health problem, can I still donate? The important thing to remember is that your potential to donate will be determined at the time of death. There are few medical illnesses that absolutely rule people out for organ donation. Medical criteria for tissue donation are stricter since most tissue transplants are considered life enhancing as opposed to life saving. Even if you have had a serious health problem like diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, certain types of cancer, or even hepatitis you may still be able to donate at the time of death. If I signed a donor card, am I on a national donor registry? Many people who signed donor cards over the years believe they are part of a national donor registry. There is no universally recognized national registry of organ donors. Most states now offer the opportunity to register as a donor through the driver license program or through independent state-run registries. These state-based programs are important because they enable donors to go on record with their wishes; often donor cards are missing and families are unaware of their loved one's wishes. Even though a donor card is considered a legal document, most donor programs will defer to the family or next-of-kin if they Continue reading >>

Faqs On Organ Donation | Features

Faqs On Organ Donation | Features

More To Give: Be An Organ Donor Organ Donation Campaign FAQs on Organ Donation Here's the lowdown on everything you need to know about organ donation and transplantation. If you have any more questions or queries, please leave them in the comment box, we will get back to you. Edited By: Tania Goklany | August 22, 2017 4:23 PM | Organ Donation Campaign Heres the lowdown on everything you need to know about organ donation and transplantation. If you have any more questions or queries, please leave them in the comment box, we will get back to you. Or you can Ask Our Experts here. Organs can be pledged online with National Organ & Tissue Transplant Organisation (NOTTO), which comes under the Governments Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. You can also register at Organ Retrieval Banking Organization (ORBO), AIIMS Hospital, or NGOs like the Mohan Foundation, ORGAN India, Gift Your Organ Foundation, etc. No donation cost is borne by the donor or the donors family. Is there an age or sex bar for donating organs? No, both sexes and people of varied ages can donate organs. The youngest donor in India has been a one-and-a-half year old baby, and the oldest an 83-year-old woman. Organs: Heart, Liver, Lungs, Pancreas, Kidneys, Intestine Tissues: Cornea, Skin, Heart Valves, Bones, Tendons, Blood Vessels, Ear Drums Can all organs be donated only after my death? No; one can donate kidney, parts of liver, and parts of pancreas when alive if theres a match. This match is determined by myriad of medical examinations. Most importantly, the blood group must match. According to the Transplantation of Human Organs (THO) Act 1994, the persons death has to be certified by a board of four medical experts twice in a time frame of six hours before the persons organs can be surgically removed: Continue reading >>

Organ Procurement Organization

Organ Procurement Organization

Victor L. Scott, ... Peter J. Davis, in Smith's Anesthesia for Infants and Children (Eighth Edition) , 2011 With the new changes, Organ Procurement Organization (OPO) members must submit data to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) under the directorship of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through the use of standardized forms and electronic databases. There are 11 OPTNs in the United States and Puerto Rico (Fig. 28-1). In addition to providing data on all deceased donors, living donors, potential transplant recipients, and actual transplant recipients, all OPOs must also submit of the total number of reported deaths by donor hospital. Angelika C. Gruessner, Rainer W.G. Gruessner, in Kidney TransplantationPrinciples and Practice (Seventh Edition) , 2014 The allocation scheme must accommodate candidates for a solitary pancreas transplant and candidates for a deceased donor kidney transplant. In some organ procurement organizations, usually single-center organizations, SPK candidates are given priority over KTA candidates when the pancreas and a kidney from a deceased donor are suitable for transplantation. Some organ procurement organizations have no, or few, solitary PTA candidates listed. In such organizations, the local use of deceased donor pancreata depends on whether SPK candidates are given priority over KTA candidates (diabetic and non-diabetic). If priority is given to SPK candidates, theoretically, half of the kidneys would go to uremic diabetics (even though they comprise less than half of the combined SPK and KTA list). The result would be shorter kidney waiting times for patients with diabetic nephropathy than for patients with other causes of end-stage renal disease. The proportion of uremic diabetic patients who are lis Continue reading >>

Can I Donate My Organs If Ive Had Cancer?

Can I Donate My Organs If Ive Had Cancer?

Can I Donate My Organs if Ive Had Cancer? Many cancer survivors want to help other people by becoming organ donors. Its possible for many people whove had cancer to donate, but it varies by cancer type and medical condition. Theres always an urgent need for donated organs. According to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), the organization that facilitates every organ transplant in the United States, nearly 125,000 people are waiting for organs. Some organ donations, such as a kidney, may be done when a person is still living. Others are possible only if a person wishing to donate passes away under certain circumstances. The risk of passing cancer on to the person who gets an organ is extremely small, but there have been some reports in the medical literature of this happening. This is partly because organ recipients are given drugs to suppress their immune systems to help prevent rejection of the transplant. This could make the immune system unable to identify and kill cancer cells that may have been transplanted with the organ. According to a study by UNOS, under certain circumstances there may be an acceptable risk in using organs from donors who have had certain types of cancer. This is particularly true if theres a long cancer-free interval before the organ donation. At present, UNOS does not recommend accepting organs from people with actively spreading cancer. This means that most people recently diagnosed with cancer cannot donate organs, but its OK to accept organs from donors with primary brain tumors that have not spread beyond the brain stem. Organs transplanted from these donors have not been found to impact life expectancy when compared with people who received organs from donors without brain cancer. In a study of nearly 500 organ recipients, no o Continue reading >>

Organs & Tissues For Transplant

Organs & Tissues For Transplant

One person can save up to eight lives through organ donation—and they can improve the lives of over a hundred people through tissue donation. Recipients might need a transplanted organ for any number of reasons, from disease to congenital defects to simple wear-and-tear. The following information will help you understand more about organs and tissue that can be donated: Organ Donation Heart Over 2,600 people are waiting for a heart transplant nationwide. Some conditions that might make a transplant necessary are cardiomyopathy, heart failure, myocarditis, and heart disease. The heart can be preserved outside of the body for 4 to 6 hours before transplant into a recipient. Transplants are blood typed and matched for the size and weight of the donor. Liver Some conditions that could make a liver transplant necessary are birth defects of the liver or bile duct, chronic liver infections like hepatitis, or drug and alcohol damage. The liver can be preserved outside of the body for 4 to 16 hours. Transplants are blood typed and matched for the size and weight of donor. A donated liver can sometimes be split between two recipients, so one donor can be the source of two liver transplants. Pancreas The pancreas controls the level of glucose in the blood, and it is often transplanted with a kidney because diabetes affects both organs. Conditions that could make a pancreas transplant necessary are diabetes or pancreas failure. The pancreas can be preserved outside of the body for 2 to 14 hours before transplant into a recipient. Transplants are blood typed and matched for the size and weight of the donor. Lung A single lung can save a life—and one donor can be the source of two separate lung transplants. Some conditions that could make a lung transplant necessary are cystic fi Continue reading >>

What Organs Can I Donate?

What Organs Can I Donate?

"A couple of weeks after Denises passing, I received a letter from the organ donation team informing me that five different lives had been saved from Denises organ donation." "If you could see Ben and the difference his transplant has made to both his life and ours you would really see what a truly amazing gift this is." "In July 2010 a nurse told me that a heart had become available. It was very surreal, I wasn't afraid; in fact I was overjoyed as I knew this was the only way I was going to survive." Show your support with friends and followers Advances in transplant medicine mean more patients can now be saved, or their quality of life improved. Transplants are regularly carried out on the kidneys, heart, liver, lungs, pancreas and small bowel. Also, tissue such as corneas and heart valves can be donated. Patients of all ages, including newborn babies, require donation for many different reasons including illness and accident. For example, organs such as lungs and the heart can be used for patients suffering from cystic fibrosis or heart disease. Tissue donation can be used to help patients see again or relieve pain. The many ways which organ donation can help arent always obvious - another reason why it is important to register because we all have the potential to help someone in need of an organ or tissue. When you sign the NHS Donor Register, you can chose which organs you wish to donate.Below is a list oforgans whichcan be donated and how they can are used. For conditions such as heart disease, sometimes medication or conventional operations no longer work. A transplant is sometimes the only option. Many patients needing a transplant have chronic infection of the lungs from either cystic fibrosis or other conditions such as bronchiectasis. When kidneys fail, peop Continue reading >>

Can An Insulin Dependent Diabetic Be An Organ Donor After Death?

Can An Insulin Dependent Diabetic Be An Organ Donor After Death?

Can an insulin dependent diabetic be an organ donor after death? Yes, if the organs are functioning normally. An insulin dependent diabetic cannot donate a pancreas, but could donate other organs. Are there any solutions for continued calf, ankle and foot swelling? My numbers are back to normal and I try to monitor salt intake, but it's been a year and they look awful. I also have very strong muscle cramps, sometimes in the groin area and some times the calf. I take magnesium and Co Q10 every day. I came off Prednisone 2 months ago and still get very achy joints and stiff muscles. Takes a few moments to get started after sitting for awhwile. My heart is good and I'm anxious to get back to working out without additional cramping! Have lost 11 lbs with 40 more to go. The National Kidney Foundation is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families, and tens of millions of Americans at risk. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the giving public with an easily recognizable symbol which certifies that the National Kidney Foundation meets the comprehensive standards of America's most experienced charity evaluator. We subscribe to the HONcode principles of the Health on the Net Foundation. Verify here Continue reading >>

Organ Donor Specimens: What Can They Tell Us About Type 1 Diabetes?

Organ Donor Specimens: What Can They Tell Us About Type 1 Diabetes?

Organ donor specimens: What can they tell us about type 1 diabetes? We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Organ donor specimens: What can they tell us about type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic disease resulting from the destruction of pancreatic beta cells, due to a poorly understood combination of genetic, environmental, and immune factors. The JDRF Network for Pancreatic Organ donors with Diabetes (nPOD) program recovers transplantation quality pancreas from organ donors throughout the USA. In addition to recovery of donors with T1D, non-diabetic donors include those with islet autoantibodies. Donors with type 2 diabetes and other conditions are also recovered to aid investigations directed at the full spectrum of pathophysiological mechanisms affecting beta cells. One central processing laboratory conducts standardized procedures for sample processing, storage, and distribution, intended for current and future cutting edge investigations. Baseline histology characterizations are performed on the pancreatic samples, with images of the staining results provided though whole-slide digital scans. Uniquely, these high-grade biospecimens are provided without expense to investigators, working worldwide, seeking methods for disease prevention and reversal strategies. Collaborative working groups are highly encouraged, bringing together multiple investigators with different expertise to foster collaborations Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions About Donation

Frequently Asked Questions About Donation

Frequently Asked Questions About Donation Answer: Anyone can choose to be a donor. Medical state at the time of death will settle what organs and tissues can be given, not age or illness. Medical staff assesses the chance for donation on a case-by-case basis at the time of death. Can a person be too old or sick to donate? Answer: No. People of all ages may be an organ and tissue donor. Your medical condition at the time of death will determine what organs and tissue can be donated. A physician will decide whether your organs and tissue can be transplanted. Can I be a donor without being in the Registry? Answer: Yes. Signing up in the Registry is not a requirement to donate. If you want to be a donor and not join the Registry, share your choice. Tell your family about your choice. Telling your family and joining the Registry is still one of the best options. Answer: The Registry holds your record to be a donor and is on hand 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Due to the fast and emotional nature of events at the time of death, families do not always have time to check legal papers. The Registry helps to honor your choice. It can also help ease your family's level of stress and worry at the time of your death when they know your choice. How can I become an organ, eye, and tissue donor? Answer: Consider yourself a potential organ and tissue donor. Your medical condition and circumstances of your death will determine what organs and tissues can be donated. Once you make the decision to be a donor, record your decision. There are several ways you can document your decision to give an anatomical gift: Register your decision in Missouris Registry online. Enroll in the Registry when you obtain or renew an instruction permit or driver/nondriver license. Complete and mail in a regis Continue reading >>

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