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Can Diabetes Cause Severe Stomach Pain?

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: Know The Risk Factors For This Mysterious Stomach Condition

Gastroparesis: Know The Risk Factors For This Mysterious Stomach Condition

As diabetes cases skyrocket, another condition called gastroparesis is rapidly becoming a more common diagnosis. It reduces the ability of the stomach to empty its contents but does not involve a blockage. Nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, bloating and chronic abdominal pain are the hallmark symptoms, according to gastroenterologist Michael Cline, DO. If you have diabetes, gastroparesis can cause it to be poorly controlled. Severe gastroparesis makes it difficult to manage your blood sugar. Primary care physicians — and even gastroenterologists — frequently overlook and under-diagnose the condition, he says. Sometimes it is initially misdiagnosed as an ulcer, heartburn or an allergic reaction. In non-diabetic patients, the condition may relate to acid reflux. “In current data, up to 40 percent of people with acid reflux have some sort of delay in gastric emptying,” he says. “So that’s a fairly large number, when you look at the millions of Americans who have acid reflux,” Dr. Cline says. Stomach motility either abnormal or absent Gastroparesis, which means partial paralysis of the stomach, is a serious disease that prevents your stomach from digesting food and emptying properly. Damaged nerves and muscles don’t function with their normal strength and coordination. That slows the movement of contents through your digestive system. Doctors don’t yet know how to reverse the damage, but there is a range of treatment options. And, early diagnosis helps, Dr. Cline says. A look at what causes gastroparesis The primary cause of gastroparesis is damage to or dysfunction of peripheral nerves and muscles. In diabetic patients, Dr. Cline says, it appears as more of a neuropathy-based disease associated with damaged nerves. In patients who don’t have diabetes, Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Stomach Pain Could Be Symptom Of This Deadly Episode - Which Can Cause Internal Bleeding

Stomach Pain Could Be Symptom Of This Deadly Episode - Which Can Cause Internal Bleeding

An aortic abdominal aneurysm (AAA) is a swelling (aneurysm) of the aorta – the main blood vessel that leads away from the heart, down through the abdomen to the rest of the body. The abdominal aorta is the largest blood vessel in the body and is usually around 2cm wide. While most aneurysms are small and don’t need treatment, the blood vessel can swell to over 5.5cm – what doctors class as a large AAA. If it bursts it can cause significant internal bleeding, which is usually fatal. Experts don’t know exactly what causes abdominal aortic aneurysm although it is linked to atherosclerosis and the build-up of fatty deposits in the arteries. To reduce the risk of the condition, people can give up smoking, control blood pressure, lower cholesterol levels and maintain a healthy weight. The British Heart Foundation said: “A large aneurysm can burst and cause internal bleeding. “This is a medical emergency and you should call 999 immediately if you or someone with you has any of these symptoms.” Symptoms include: - a sudden severe pain in the abdomen, back or lower back area - feeling cold, clammy, sweaty, faint and breathless - loss of consciousness The charity said: “In most cases there are no noticeable symptoms and most people with AAA won’t be aware that they have one. “However if an aneurysm becomes large it can cause pain, a pulsating feeling in your abdomen, or persistent back pain.” The condition affect more men than women and risk increases over the age of 65. People with a family history of the condition are also at greater risk. Experts are still relatively unsure what causes abdominal aortic aneurysm - although it is linked to atherosclerosis and the build-up of fatty material in your arteries. In November, 2016, experts revealed three times as Continue reading >>

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

When Diabetes Leads To A Lazy Stomach: The Goods On Gastroparesis

Gastroparesis doesn’t sound good, and it isn’t. Literally “stomach paralysis,” it is a form of diabetic neuropathy, or nerve damage, that is a common complication of diabetes. The damaged nerve in question is the vagus nerve, named for its vagabond-like wandering nature. The vagus nerve meanders all the way from the brainstem to the colon, controlling heart rate, sweating, gastrointestinal contractions, and various other involuntary, automatic functions on its way. In the case of gastroparesis, it’s the vagus nerve’s control of stomach contractions that’s damaged. The stomach is basically a hollow ball made of muscle that serves as a storage container and mixing bowl for food. It’s about the size of a small melon, but it can stretch to hold nearly a gallon if you really press the issue. In healthy people, wave-like contractions of the stomach, prompted by the vagus nerve, crush and churn your food into small particles and mix it up with enzymes and acids produced by the stomach’s inner lining. Then the stomach contractions, coming along in waves at about three per minute, slowly and evenly propel the pulverized food out through the pyloric valve, which opens just enough to release an eighth of an ounce of food at a time. From there it’s down the small intestine, where the real nutrient absorption occurs. It can take four hours to empty your stomach into your small intestine, especially if you’ve eaten fat, which slows the process down. If the vagus nerve has been damaged by years of high blood sugars, the process hits a snag. The walls of the stomach, paralyzed by the lack of vagus nerve stimulation, don’t make their muscular wave-like contractions. As a result, food just sticks around in the stomach, unpulverized and going nowhere. It may sit an Continue reading >>

Tummy Troubles? It Could Be Too Much Coffee, A Slipped Disc... Or Even Diabetes

Tummy Troubles? It Could Be Too Much Coffee, A Slipped Disc... Or Even Diabetes

Often a tummy ache is the result of something fairly obvious — a long-term condition such as irritable bowel syndrome, a simple case of indigestion or maybe, for a woman, it could be that time of the month. But for some of us, the cause isn’t quite so apparent. ‘Many of us think the cause of stomach pain, not illogically, originates from within the tummy,’ says Dr Anton Emmanuel, a gastroenterologist at University College Hospital, London. ‘But there are many conditions that can lead to it. The abdomen is an area fed by nerves, so pain elsewhere in the body — such as the heart, throat or lungs — can also manifest itself there.’ Fortunately, most causes of abdominal pain are totally treatable, he adds. ‘However if you suddenly have acute, severe pain or a long-standing pain accompanied by the passing of blood, or coughing or vomiting, you should go straight to A&E.’ Below, experts reveal the less obvious causes of your sore tummy. Feeling bloated when you eat Possible cause: diabetes In ONE study of 136 diabetics at the University of Sydney, Australia, 35 per cent suffered abdominal bloating and 27 per cent abdominal cramping, constipation and diarrhoea. This could be the result of autonomic neuropathy, a condition that affects the nerves controlling the bowel and digestion. ‘It occurs because the high levels of glucose associated with diabetes trigger changes within the body, causing nerves to break down,’ says Richard Ross, professor of endocrinology at the University of Sheffield. ‘In the case of the stomach, it slows up the digestive process.’ Between 10 and 20 per cent of people newly diagnosed with diabetes suffer from neuropathy. Treatment involves bringing blood glucose levels under control. Coughing or sneezing hurts Possible cause: s Continue reading >>

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Gastroparesis: A Complication Of Diabetes

"Gastro" means stomach and "paresis" means impairment or paralysis. Diabetic gastropathy is a term for the spectrum of neuromuscular abnormalities of the stomach caused by diabetes. The abnormalities include gastric-dysrhythmias, antral hypomotility, incoordination of antroduodenal contractions and gastroparesis. Quick Stomach Anatomy Lesson The stomach is a neuromusclar organ that receives the food we ingest, mixes the food with acid and pepsin, and empties the nutriment suspension into the small intestine for absorption. The proximal stomach or fundus relaxes in order to receive the swallowed food (that's called receptive relaxation). The body and antrum mix and empty the food via recurrent gastric peristalic waves. The peristaltic contractions are paced by neoelectrical events called pacesetter potentials or slow waves. When gastric motility is normal, the postprandial (after eating) period is associated with pleasant epigastric sensations. Gastric motility disorders or gastroparesis presents with unpleasant, but non-specific postprandial symptoms: upper abdominal bloating, distention, discomfort, early satiety, nausea, and vomiting. If the vomitus contains undigested food, then gastroparesis is very likely to be present. Fluctuating, difficult-to-predict glucose levels may also reflect the presence of gastroparesis. Diabetes and the GI Tract The motility of your GI tract, which we were just speaking of, is controlled by an outer sleeve of muscles that surrounds your GI tract. They are controlled by a complex nervous system. Diabetes can damage these nerves, and it is this neurological long-term complication of diabetes that can lead to gastrointestinal disorders. How do we know this is the case? First, many of the people with gastroparesis have long-standing diabete Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Relief For Diabetes Stomach Pain

Managing diabetes often brings changes in what we eat and the medications we take. You may also notice some changes in how your gut, or gastrointestinal (GI) tract, feels, sounds, and responds. Changes in eating You are likely making changes in eating habits, including more foods rich in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, and beans. Fiber can be filling without adding unwanted calories, and it can help improve abnormal cholesterol levels. But there may be a few uh-ohs if you rapidly increase the amount you eat. "Gas and bloating are a side effect of fiber," says Judith Wylie-Rosett, Ed.D., R.D., professor of health promotion and nutrition research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. "Increasing your intake gradually may help." She suggests adding legumes, such as beans and lentils, to increase dietary fiber. "Throwing out the water you soak them in and giving them an extra rinse before cooking may also help decrease the gas and bloating," she says. Glucose-lowering meds Several prescription medications used to lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetes can stir up your gut. Experts tend to suggest that you start with a low dose and slowly increase it based on your provider's instructions. Metformin Metformin, the typical starting medication in type 2 diabetes to bring blood glucose levels in range, can lead to heartburn, nausea, or diarrhea. Ralph DeFronzo, M.D., professor of medicine and chief of the diabetes division at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, says, "I try to use metformin in all of my patients who have type 2 diabetes. When there is a problem, it is diarrhea and abdominal discomfort. There are 5-10 percent of people who just can't tolerate it." Typically, metformin is started at a low dose and increased Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Gastrointestinal Symptoms Cause Identified, Treatment Possible

Type 1 Diabetes Gastrointestinal Symptoms Cause Identified, Treatment Possible

The cause of chronic gastrointestinal symptoms in type 1 diabetes has been uncovered, so researchers are hopeful that treatment is now possible. Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in type 1 diabetes; some of them include delayed emptying of the stomach, irritable bowel syndrome, abdominal distention and fecal incontinence – all of which can impact a person’s quality of life. Up until now the cause of these gastrointestinal symptoms in type 1 diabetes has been unknown, but researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio have now revealed it. Details about the study The findings, published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, uncovered the cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in type 1 diabetes. Professor at the University, Franco Folli, Ph.D., M.D., said, “Intestinal tissues from diabetic patients and healthy individuals were compared. In patients with Type 1 diabetes, the cell lining of the intestine was damaged. The stem cells that maintain this lining, called colonic stem cells, were altered. The culprit is found in a protein called insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), which is produced in the liver and in higher amounts in type 1 diabetes. IGFBP3 binds to a receptor protein on colonic stem cells causing their death and, in turn, damaging the intestinal lining.” The team conducted further research with biopharmaceuticals which blocked circulating levels of the protein. They found that the drug can reverse damage to the colon. Dr. Folli concluded, “This is a very exciting finding, obtained by studying patients’ cells, that has the potential to result in a new treatment for this chronic complication of longstanding Type 1 diabetes.” Effect of diabetes on the gastrointestinal tract A reported 75 percent of diabetes pa Continue reading >>

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

What’s Bugging Your Gut? Diabetes, Ibs Or Both?

If you have “gut issues” – meaning diarrhea, constipation, cramping, abdominal pain or nausea – and you have diabetes, you are not alone. In fact, this relationship is more common than you – or your doctor – may realize. Up to 75% of people with diabetes have at least one gastrointestinal symptom. These GI problems can include diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, and vomiting. The most common GI problem that results in diarrhea is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and the links between gut problems, namely IBS and blood sugars are tightly woven and interconnected. Even the severity of symptoms is closely linked to the glycemic control of the individual. Meaning the worse the glycemic control, the worse the GI symptoms. High blood sugars make it hard for the stomach and small intestine to work normally. At the same time, IBS itself can make it harder for your body to control post-prandial (or “after meal”) blood sugars. A Missed Diagnosis and Continued Suffering Sadly, people with diabetes suffer from the effect of undiagnosed IBS or other digestive disruption every day. Some people with diabetes are told their abdominal pain and gastrointestinal discomfort is just a complication of their poorly controlled blood sugars—leaving Irritable Bowel Syndrome (or other digestive disorders) undiagnosed and, therefore, untreated. To complicate matters further, symptoms of both diabetes and IBS are greatly impacted by diet, stress, and general health. In diabetes, GI problems are often related to what’s referred to as autonomic gastrointestinal neuropathy resulting in abnormal motility. “Motility” refers to your body’s ability to move through the digestive system – including your stomach, small and large intestine at the right speed: not too fast, not to Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Abdominal Pain In An Adult With Type 2 Diabetes: A Case Report

Abdominal Pain In An Adult With Type 2 Diabetes: A Case Report

Go to: Case presentation A 57-year-old Caucasian male, heavy smoker patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus diagnosed 15 years ago and treated with insulin during the last 4 years, was admitted to the hospital because of mild constant abdominal pain, which was exaggerated after eating and drinking water. The pain started some 5 years ago, gradually worsened, and was accompanied by reluctance to eat, weight loss, nausea, vomiting and changes in bowel habits. On admission, the patient was cachectic and vital signs were in the lower normal values. On physical examination, diffuse abdominal pain in both superficial and deep palpation was noticed. The patient had background diabetic retinopathy, proteinuria due to diabetic nephropathy and peripheral neuropathy. He has been treated with isophane insulin 15 IU in the morning and 12 IU in the evening, pentoxifylline 300 mg bid and ramipril 5 mg once a day. His HbA1c was 7.1%. The patient did not have diabetic ketoacidosis or hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state during his hospitalisation, and thus pseudoperitonitis diabeticorum, a complication which may accompany these metabolic disturbances, was ruled out. Spinal mono- or polyradiculopathy was excluded by detailed history, clinical examination and paraspinal electromyography. The patient underwent endoscopy of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract to exclude oesophageal, stomach or large bowel disease, but the examination was unremarkable. Helicobacter Pylori was not detected on biopsies obtained from the stomach. Abdominal ultrasound examination, imaging with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pancreas were normal. Immunological studies for vasculitis were negative. Other causes of abdominal pain, such as aortic aneurysm, h Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

Listen To Your Body: Diabetic Stomach Pains

Listen To Your Body: Diabetic Stomach Pains

Stomach aches and other gastrointestinal pains can be signs of a bigger problem. One such problem for diabetics is gastroparesis, or delayed stomach emptying, a digestive problem in which the the stomach cannot empty itself of food normally. It is most commonly found in people with type 1 diabetes but can also occur in those with type 2 diabetes. This condition is caused by damage to the vagus nerve, which helps regulate the digestive system. If the vagus nerve is damaged, the muscles of the stomach and intestine are not able to work properly and food is not processed and pumped through the intestines. Symptoms of Gastroparesis Heartburn or reflux Nausea Vomiting undigested food Poor control of blood sugar Feeling full quickly when eating Abdominal bloating Poor appetite and weight loss Health Risks When food is not processed, it may stay in the stomach for a long time and spoil, which can lead to bacteria growth. Food in the stomach can also harden and turn into a lump. These lumps can cause blockage and keep food from moving down into the small intestine. When living with diabetes, it is important to regulate blood sugar levels, but gastroparesis can make it difficult. This is because when food finally leaves the stomach and enters the small intestine it causes a rise in blood sugar levels, which can make it difficult to control blood sugar levels consistently. In more severe cases of gastroparesis, daily vomiting has been known to occur. Prevention When trying to minimize the risk of gastroparesis, people with diabetes should try to control their blood sugar levels by making small changes to their routine. For instance, you may want to change when and how often you use insulin and check your blood sugar levels more often. Furthermore, some medications like antidepres Continue reading >>

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