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Calculating Insulin To Carb Ratio

Calculating The Insulin To Carbohydrate Ratio Using Thehyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic Clamp-a Novel Use For A Proven Technique.

Calculating The Insulin To Carbohydrate Ratio Using Thehyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic Clamp-a Novel Use For A Proven Technique.

1. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2007 Sep;23(6):472-8. Calculating the insulin to carbohydrate ratio using thehyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp-a novel use for a proven technique. Bevier WC(1), Zisser H, Palerm CC, Finan DA, Seborg DE, Doyle FJ, Wollitzer AO,Jovanovic L. (1)Sansum Diabetes Research Institute, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, USA. BACKGROUND: In patients with type 1 diabetes, three main variables need to beassessed to optimize meal-related insulin boluses: pre-meal blood glucose (BG),insulin to carbohydrate ratio (I : C), and basal insulin. We are presenting data for a novel use of the hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp (HEC) in patients withtype 1 diabetes that minimizes the impact of these variables and can be used todetermine the I : C.METHODS: Ten subjects (six men and four women) using continuous subcutaneousinsulin infusion (CSII) pumps were recruited for this study [24-65 years; BMI27.1 +/- 4.9 kg/m(2); A1C 7.2 +/- 1.4% (mean +/- SD)]. The HEC used a primedcontinuous intravenous insulin infusion of 40 mU/m(2)/min and a variable infusionof 20% glucose to maintain BG at 90 mg/dL. After subjects were in steady state(SS) for 50 min, a standardized meal (40% of total calories/day - 30%carbohydrate, 30% protein, 40% fat) was consumed. Subjects gave the insulin boluswith their CSII pump. No changes were made in the glucose infusion rate.RESULTS: Mean BG at SS was 85.7 +/- 10.4 mg/dL. Peak BG was 115.0 +/- 12.7 mg/dL at 68.5 +/- 8.8 min after the meal. Mean I : C was 1 : 9.3 +/- 1.7 (range 1 : 7-1: 12). Insulin sensitivity varied from 1.9 to 9.1 mg/kg/min.CONCLUSIONS: The HEC can be used to reduce confounding factors and to determinethe I : C. As a first estimate of the I : C in patients with type 1 diabetes, it is recommended to start with a ratio of 1 : 9.3 and t Continue reading >>

Calculating Insulin Dose

Calculating Insulin Dose

You'll need to calculate some of your insulin doses. You'll also need to know some basic things about insulin. For example, 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight. Your provider will prescribe an insulin dose regimen for you; however, you still need to calculate some of your insulin doses. Your insulin dose regimen provides formulas that allow you to calculate how much bolus insulin to take at meals and snacks, or to correct high blood sugars. In this section, you will find: First, some basic things to know about insulin: Approximately 40-50% of the total daily insulin dose is to replace insulin overnight, when you are fasting and between meals. This is called background or basal insulin replacement. The basal or background insulin dose usually is constant from day to day. The other 50-60% of the total daily insulin dose is for carbohydrate coverage (food) and high blood sugar correction. This is called the bolus insulin replacement. Bolus – Carbohydrate coverage The bolus dose for food coverage is prescribed as an insulin to carbohydrate ratio. The insulin to carbohydrate ratio represents how many grams of carbohydrate are covered or disposed of by 1 unit of insulin. Generally, one unit of rapid-acting insulin will dispose of 12-15 grams of carbohydrate. This range can vary from 6-30 grams or more of carbohydrate depending on an individual’s sensitivity to insulin. Insulin sensitivity can vary according to the time of day, from person to person, and is affected by physical activity and stress. Bolus – High blood sugar correction (also known as insulin sensitivity factor) The bolus dose for high blood sugar correction is defined as how much one unit of rapid-acting insulin will drop the blood sugar. Generally, to correct a high bloo Continue reading >>

Carb Counting

Carb Counting

Last week we talked about two types of diabetes meal planning tools: the exchange system and the plate method. While both of these approaches can work well, today, more and more people with diabetes are turning to carbohydrate counting. Carbohydrate, or “carb”, counting, really isn’t all that new. In fact, Dr. Elliott Joslin taught carb counting to his patients back in the early part of the 20th Century: “In teaching patients their diet,” he said, “I lay emphasis first on carbohydrate values, and teach to a few only the values for protein and fat.” Patients who came to Joslin Clinic in those days were taught by Dr. Joslin himself, and today, the walls of Joslin Diabetes Center are lined with pictures of folks from that period sitting in a classroom with gram scales in front of them for the purpose of weighing their food. Since those days, many aspects of diabetes care have changed for the better, but carb counting has made a comeback as an effective yet simple approach to help people better manage their diabetes. There are actually two types of carb counting. The first type, often called basic or consistent carb counting (or, as one of the doctors at Joslin likes to say, “CC”), is usually what most people with diabetes learn about these days. Basic carb counting isn’t a diet, but rather a tool to help you better plan meals and learn how your food choices affect your blood glucose levels. As you may know, most of the carbohydrate we eat turns to glucose (sugar) during digestion. Our bodies then use this glucose for energy. Let’s review the types of foods that contain carbohydrate: Bread, pasta, cereals, rice Starchy vegetables (corn, peas, potatoes, lima beans) Fruit and fruit juices Milk and yogurt Sweets and desserts (Non-starchy vegetables, such Continue reading >>

Insulin Dosing Worksheet €” Correction Formula Insulin To Carbohydrate Ratio

Insulin Dosing Worksheet €” Correction Formula Insulin To Carbohydrate Ratio

Calculate insulin dose to correct a high blood sugar • If pre-meal blood sugar is high, take the blood sugar reading and subtract target blood sugar. • Divide what remains by the correction factor. • The result is the amount of insulin needed to correct high blood sugar. (blood sugar – target) ÷ correction factor = units of insulin needed 1 unit : _________ grams carbohydrate Correction formula (Blood sugar – target blood sugar) ÷ correction factor Target blood sugar ________ Correction factor ____________ Calculate insulin dose for food • Add up all the carbohydrates in your meal. • Divide the total carbohydrates by the insulin to carbohydrate ratio. • The result is the amount of insulin units needed. Total carbs ÷ insulin to carb ratio = units of insulin needed Visit choa.org/diabetes for additional copies. ©2017 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Inc. All rights reserved. MED 966873.rb.02/17 Time Correction insulinInsulin for food Total insulin (units) Meal Breakfast Morning snack Afternoon snack Lunch Dinner Bedtime Time Food + correction insulin (units) BS*: - _________ - _________ - _________ - _________ *BS required BS*: *BS required BS*: *BS required BS*: *BS required Blood sugar (BS) level Correction formula (BS-target/ correction factor) Correction insulin calculated (units) Total carbohydrates (g) Food formula (carb count/ carb ratio) Food insulin calculated (units) -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- Daily plan: Calculate total insulin dose • Add the number of units needed for food to the number of units needed to correct blood sugar to get your total dose of insulin (Humalog/Novolog/Apidra). Food insulin + correction insulin = total insulin 1. Wash and dry hands thoro Continue reading >>

Calculations Of Carb To Insulin Ratios

Calculations Of Carb To Insulin Ratios

A carbohydrate to insulin ratio is the amount of insulin used to lower the blood sugar from a particular amount of grams of carbohydrates eaten. For example, some people have a 15:1 carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio or they take 1 unit of insulin for every 15 grams of carbohydrates they eat. But other Type 1s need 1 unit of insulin for every 10 or even 8 grams of carbohydrates. Every person responds a little differently to insulin. The 450/500 rule goes as follows: If a person is taking rapid-acting insulin such as Humalog, Novolog or Apidra they would follow the 500 rule which states: Divide 500 by the total daily dose of insulin. The result is the grams of carbohydrates that are approximately covered by 1 unit of insulin. For example, add up all the insulin you take for the day and divide by 500. If your total daily dose was 45 units, you would divide 500 by 45 and your ratio would be 11:1. If a person is taking short-acting insulin such as Humulin R or Novolin R (Regular insulins) they would follow the 450 rule which states: Divide 450 by the total daily dose of insulin. The result is the grams of carbohydrates that are approximately covered by 1 unit of insulin. For example, add up all the insulin you take for the day and divide by 450. If your total daily dose was 45 units, you would divide 450 by 45 and your ratio would be 10:1. (calculator) Continue reading >>

What’s A Correction Factor? An Insulin Sensitivity? A Ratio?

What’s A Correction Factor? An Insulin Sensitivity? A Ratio?

Share: A Correction Factor (sometimes called insulin sensitivity), is how much 1 unit of rapid acting insulin will generally lower your blood glucose over 2 to 4 hours when you are in a fasting or pre-meal state. However, you should keep in mind: this is an estimate it may need to change as your baseline dose changes expect variations - sometimes 1 unit will lower it by more, and other times 1unit will lower it by less! calculating how much 1 unit of insulin will drop your blood sugar is a trial and error process, and sensitivity to insulin varies with the individual To get your total daily dose, add up all your usual meal time insulin and basal insulin. For example, Tom wants to calculate his correction factor: daily insulin dose: 8 units at breakfast, 6 units at lunch,10 at dinner and N/NPH 8 units at breakfast and 18 units at 10 pm Total Daily Dose (TDD) = 8 + 8 + 6+ 10 + 18 = 50 Correction Factor (CF) = 100/50 = 2 Therefore, one unit of rapid acting insulin would lower Tom’s blood sugar by 2 mmol/L over the next 2 to 4 hours. The average adult needs approximately 1 unit of insulin for every 2 mmol increase in blood sugar, but this can vary a lot between individuals: some people need 1 unit of insulin for every 1 mmol/L increase in blood sugar others need 1 unit of insulin for every 3 -5 mmol/L increase in blood sugar Using your CF before meal doses Before meal means there has been about 4 hours or more since you last ate or took an insulin dose for carbohydrate containing food or beverage. The correction factor or insulin sensitivity can be used to make a scale for pre meal insulin doses. BG Breakfast Lunch Dinner Bed Basal < 3.9 -2 -2 -2 Snack 4.0 - 5.9 Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline 6.0 - 7.9 Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline Baseline 8.0 – 9.9 Continue reading >>

The 500 Rule | Diabetesnet.com

The 500 Rule | Diabetesnet.com

Wed, 12/15/2010 - 16:38 -- Richard Morris The 500 Rule (aka 450 Rule) from Using Insulin and the Pocket Pancreas is a great way to estimate how many grams of carbohydrate will be covered by one unit of Humalog or Novolog insulin. This is your insulin to carb ratio or your carb factor. Once you know this, you can count the grams of carb in the food you want to eat and divide by your carb factor to find how many units of bolus insulin are needed to cover the carbs. This allows flexibility in your food choices because any number of carbs can be covered with a matching dose of insulin. The 500 Rule used to determine your carb factor depends on accurately knowing your TDD. As with basal doses, an accurate carb factor can be determined only after you've calculated an accurate TDD for yourself. estimates grams of carb per unit of Humalog or Novolog insulins (the 450 Rule is used with Regular insulin) 500 divided by your TDD (Total Daily Dose of insulin) = grams of carb covered by one unit of Humalog or Novolog Lets you keep your post meal readings normal! Someone's TDD = 50 units (i.e., the total amount of say Humalog and Lente insulins they used per day). 500/50 = 10 grams of carbohydrate covered by each unit of Humalog insulin TDD = all fast insulin taken before meals, plus all long-acting insulin used in a day. If Humalog is used everyday to correct high readings, this may also need to be factored into the TDD. For instance, if someone's TDD is "30 units" (5 H before each meal, plus 15 Lantus at bedtime), but they need 8 to 12 units more almost every day to bring down highs, at least some of this 8 to 12 units will need to be factored into a new TDD. Caution: The 500 Rule will be most accurate for those who make no insulin of their own and receive 50% to 60% of their TDD a Continue reading >>

Insulin-to-carb Ratios To Calculate Meal Insulin Doses With Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin-to-carb Ratios To Calculate Meal Insulin Doses With Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin-to-carb ratios to calculate meal insulin doses with type 1 diabetes Some children and teens want or need options in meal planning. Using an insulin-to-carb ratio is a way for you to get the right amount of insulin for the carbohydrate you eat if you are not sticking to a carbohydrate pattern. Then you can eat different amounts of carbohydrate at each meal. Are not sure your very young child will eat all the carbohydrate in the meal Do not like some foods served with a meal Are eating a meal with a lot of carbohydrate The insulin-to-carb ratio means you will take 1 unit of insulin for a certain amount of carbohydrate. For example, if your insulin-to-carb ratio is 1 unit of insulin for every 10 grams of carbohydrate (written 1:10), you will take 1 unit of insulin for every 10 grams of carbohydrate you eat. To use an insulin-to-carb ratio, you need to: Take your rapid-acting insulin 15 minutes before you eat. The only time it is okay to take the rapid-acting insulin after eating is for very young children who may not eat everything. If a child is taking their insulin after they eat, they must take it as soon as they finish eating, within 30 minutes of their first bite of food. Taking insulin after eating will always result in a high blood sugar a few hours later. Taking insulin before eating and then not eating all of the planned carbohydrate will result in a low blood sugar when the rapid-acting insulin peaks. If you will be using an insulin-to-carb ratio to calculate rapid-acting insulin doses, you will need to be accurate at counting carbohydrate and doing math to calculate your dose. When using your insulin-to-carb ratio, you divide the total grams of carbohydrate by the ratio amount. Your breakfast dose of rapid-acting insulin is 1:10. You plan to eat a total Continue reading >>

Mysugr Bolus Calculator Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

Mysugr Bolus Calculator Get Help With Your Insulin Dose (currently Available In Eu)

mySugr Bolus Calculator get help with your insulin dose (currently available in EU) It's time for lunch. Your blood sugar is 165 mg/dl (9.2 mmol/L). You have a big slice of pizza, a bag of chips, and a cold Diet Coke waiting for you. How much insulin do you take? Theres not much to think about. You always eat the same thing and always take the same amount of insulin. You define the phrase creature of habit. You hate thinking about all of this stuff, so you just guess. You love doing a bunch of math before every meal, so calculating your insulin dose is fun and easy. I can relate to the first two. Theres a lot of value in routine, and Ive also done my share of guesstimating. That last one? Enjoying all of the diabetes math? Im sorry. Thats just weird. (Im teasing. Kind of) But theres another option, and it makes thinking about your insulin doses easier and more precise. Im talking about a bolus calculator. If you wear an insulin pump, youre probably already using one (theyre often built-in). Youre welcome to stay and read, but theres not much new information for you here. However, if youre using injections (syringes or pens), like most people with diabetes, then stick around. This article should be helpful. So you dont have (or want) an insulin pump, but I bet you have a smartphone. What does that mean? It means that you should meet mySugrs Bolus Calculator . Its a module integrated into the mySugr app that helps with your insulin doses (note: mySugr Bolus Calculator is currently approved for use in Europe). What the heck is a bolus, you ask? Great question. A bolus, in our case, is a single dose of insulin given all at once. In other words, its your mealtime shot or a shot to fix a high blood sugar. mySugrs Bolus Calculator examines all of the messy numbers involved an Continue reading >>

Insulin To Carbs Ratio

Insulin To Carbs Ratio

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi - need some general advice about how to create a ratio of insulin to carbs. I know this should be done with GP/Nurse etc, but their advice has been of limited use - "try injecting 4 units of rapid acting and see how it goes". First the goal. Am I right in assuming the aim is to get my post eating blood glucose reading back to below 8 after 2 hours. Is this the same for those chasing the low carb plan - I'm still developing my understanding of what HIGH sugars are, when they start doing damage, but I have read enough to know that NICE guidance isnt necessarily best guidance. So any ideas other logic would be great to help me shape my way forward. Second, the ratio of insulin to carbs. I know I can learn this on DAFNE, but I'm not allowed to go until I have been diabetic for a year. I don't want to run high and make mistakes for a year until they educate me. So any guidance I can get to build on the random approach recommended by my GP would be great. I think others on the forum have said 10g of carbs = 1 unit of rapid acting. Is this a sensible kick off point if I am not taking background insulin. I don't need background. If I eat low carb, I don't need insulin at all at this stage. To put peoples minds at rest and in the hope of getting some advice, I am monitoring regularly - hourly and 2 hoursly after meals. Always before I drive (3 - 4 times a day) and before I go to bed. HELP - please. I really want to get this on track and I'm getting readings in the 10+ and hypos when I follow the expert advice. It is a bit of trial and error but just for example my son is 1:10 for Breakfast, 1:17 for lunch and 1:15 for dinner. I think DAFNE start at 1:10 but Continue reading >>

Insulin-to-carbohydrate Ratio

Insulin-to-carbohydrate Ratio

A ratio that specifies the number of grams of carbohydrate covered by each unit of rapid- or short-acting insulin. This ratio serves as the foundation for adjusting premeal bolus insulin doses. Counting grams of carbohydrate (or carbohydrate “choices”) and using an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio allows a person to give himself just enough insulin to cover the carbohydrate he plans to eat. This means he doesn’t have to eat the exact same amount of carbohydrate for a given meal each day. Knowing how to count carbohydrate and use an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio is valuable for tightly managing blood glucose levels, and it is essential for using an insulin pump effectively. A fairly typical insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio is 1 unit of insulin for every 15 grams of carbohydrate. However, the ratio varies considerably from one person to another, and a person’s own ratio may change over time or even from meal to meal. For instance, a person may need 1 unit of insulin for every 10 grams of carbohydrate at breakfast but 1 unit for every 15 grams of carbohydrate in the evening. This can be due to factors such as how much insulin is already in a person’s system, how much physical activity he has done, and fluctuations in his hormone levels throughout the course of the day. Your health-care team can help you determine your own insulin-to-carbohydrate ratios based on your blood glucose and meal records. Be sure to note the number of grams of carbohydrate in the meal, your blood glucose level before the meal, the number of units of insulin in the premeal bolus, and your blood glucose level 3–4 hours after the meal. It’s a good idea to gather 10–14 days of data before settling on a ratio. Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate-to-insulin Ratio Is Estimated From 300-400 Divided By Total Daily Insulin Dose In Type 1 Diabetes Patients Who Use The Insulin Pump.

Carbohydrate-to-insulin Ratio Is Estimated From 300-400 Divided By Total Daily Insulin Dose In Type 1 Diabetes Patients Who Use The Insulin Pump.

Abstract BACKGROUND: To optimize insulin dose using insulin pump, basal and bolus insulin doses are widely calculated from total daily insulin dose (TDD). It is recommended that total daily basal insulin dose (TBD) is 50% of TDD and that the carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) equals 500 divided by TDD. We recently reported that basal insulin requirement is approximately 30% of TDD. We therefore investigated CIR after adjustment of the proper basal insulin rate. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty-five Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes were investigated during several weeks of hospitalization. The patients were served standard diabetes meals (25-30 kcal/kg of ideal body weight). Each meal omission was done to confirm basal insulin rate. Target blood glucose level was set at 100 and 150 mg/dL before and 2 h after each meal, respectively. After the basal insulin rate was fixed and target blood glucose levels were achieved, TBD, CIR, TDD, and their products were determined. RESULTS: Mean (±SD) blood glucose levels before and 2 h after meals were 121±47 and 150±61 mg/dL, respectively. TDD was 31.5±9.0 U, and TBD was 27.0±6.5% of TDD. CIR×TDD of breakfast was significantly lower than those of lunch and supper (288±73 vs. 408±92 and 387±83, respectively; P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: CIR has diurnal variance and is estimated from the formula CIR=300/TDD at breakfast or CIR=400/TDD at lunch and supper in type 1 diabetes patients. These results indicate that the insulin dose has been underestimated by using previously established calculations. Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting In Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting In Children And Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes

Carbohydrate Counting in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Pediatric Clinic, Department of Surgical and Biomedical Sciences, Universit degli Studi di Perugia, 06132 Perugia, Italy; [email protected] (G.T.); [email protected] (M.G.B.); [email protected] (L.C.); [email protected] (E.S.); [email protected] (G.M.); [email protected] (F.R.); [email protected] (G.T.) *Correspondence: [email protected] ; Tel.: +39-075-578-4417; Fax: +39-075-578-4415 Received 2017 Dec 26; Accepted 2018 Jan 16. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( ). Carbohydrate counting (CC) is a meal-planning tool for patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) treated with a basal bolus insulin regimen by means of multiple daily injections or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. It is based on an awareness of foods that contain carbohydrates and their effect on blood glucose. The bolus insulin dose needed is obtained from the total amount of carbohydrates consumed at each meal and the insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio. Evidence suggests that CC may have positive effects on metabolic control and on reducing glycosylated haemoglobin concentration (HbA1c). Moreover, CC might reduce the frequency of hypoglycaemia. In addition, with CC the flexibility of meals and snacks allows children and teenagers to manage their T1D more effectively within their own lifestyles. CC and the bolus calculator can have possible beneficial effects in improving post-meal glucose, with a higher percentage of values within the target. Moreover, CC might be integrated with the counting of fat and protein to more accurately calculat Continue reading >>

How To Calculate Insulin To Carb Ratio In A Type 2?

How To Calculate Insulin To Carb Ratio In A Type 2?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community How to calculate insulin to carb ratio in a type 2? I'm wondering if anybody could explain how to calculate an insulin to carb ratio? It's not for me but for someone else. He takes large amounts of insulin and keeps gaining weight and wants to have a go at low carbing but I don't know how to advise him on adjusting his insulin when he starts to cut the carbs as I don't know what his insulin/carb ratio is and neither does he. At present he just takes the same doses every meal as laid down by his doctor. His current HbA1c is around 10. Some suggestions , Im not type 2, t you really need to take care, make any changes gradual!, dealing with larger amounts of insulin can result in larger mistakes. He should really discuss any plan with his doctor. First Do some basal testing and try to get basal correct. Has some info on type 2 worth reading but I find the rest of it a bit confusing Method 2 ( slow steps that seem sensible to me) 3)take normal amount of insulin for that meal 4)Test and record at 2 hours and again before next meal 5)Repeat test, on other days to show pattern ( eat a similar amount of carbs to that on the first test) If level is generally within target at the following meal, then he took the right amount of insulin for that amount of carbs. If level is higher than target, he took too little etc. (the 2 hour will show the 'spike' and should be within 2-3mmol of pre meal figure, but remember that insulin will still be active for another couple of hours) 6) adjust by altering insulin gradually up or down until the right dose is achieved for that amount of carbs. 7)when 'correct' divide carbs eaten in test meal by amount of insulin taken to get Continue reading >>

Carb Factor - The 2.6 Rule - Diabetesnet.com

Carb Factor - The 2.6 Rule - Diabetesnet.com

The 2.6 Rule (formerly the 500 or 450 rule) is a great way to estimate how many grams of carbohydrate will be covered by one unit of Humalog, Novolog, or Apidra insulin. This is your insulin to carb ratio (I:C or ICR) or your carb factor (CarbF). Once you know this, you can count the grams of carb in the food you want to eat and divide by your carb factor to find how many units of bolus insulin are needed to cover the carbs. This allows flexibility in your food choices because any number of carbs can be covered with a matching dose of insulin. An accurate carb factor can be determined only after youve calculated an accurate TDD (all fast insulin taken before meals, plus all long-acting insulin used in a day). To find a starting CarbF, multiply your weight (lb) by 2.6 grams per pound and divide this number by your average TDD. For lbs: CarbF = (2.6 x Weight(lb)) TDD Someones weight is 160 lbs and their 14 day average TDD is 40 units a day. Their carbF would be 2.6 x 160 40. That equals 10.4 grams of carb per unit of insulin. When your Insulin to Carb Ratio works well, your glucose reading 5 hours later will end up within 30 mg/dL of your starting glucose. To accurately test your CarbF, you should: Start the test with a glucose between 100 to 140 md/dl. Eat enough carbs to challange your Insulin to Carb Ratio, such as grams equal to half your weight in lbs. Enter the recommended carb bolus 20 minutes before you eat. The carb bolus can be calculated by dividing the grams of carb you will be eating by your carb factor: Grams of Carb ICR Check your glucose each hour for the next 5 hours. Stop the test and eat carbs if your glucose goes below 70 mg/dl. If your glucose goes low during testing, falls more than 30 mg/dL, or remains more than 30 mg/dL above your starting glucose Continue reading >>

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