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Bubble Under Skin After Insulin Injection

How To Give A Subcutaneous Injection

How To Give A Subcutaneous Injection

Reader Approved Three Parts:Preparing for a Subcutaneous InjectionDrawing a Dose of MedicationGiving a Subcutaneous InjectionCommunity Q&A A subcutaneous injection is an injection administered into the fatty area just under the skin (as opposed to an intravenous injection, which is administered directly into the bloodstream). Because they give a slower, more gradual release than intravenous injections, subcutaneous injections are frequently used as a way to administer both vaccines and medications (for instance, type I diabetics often use this type of injection to administer insulin.). Prescriptions for medications requiring subcutaneous injections are usually accompanied by detailed instructions on the correct way to give the injection. The instructions in this article are intended to be used only as a guideline - contact a medical professional before you give any injections at home. Read on below the jump for detailed instructions. 1 Gather your supplies. Performing a subcutaneous injection properly requires more than just a needle, syringe, and medicine. Before proceeding, make sure you have the following: A sterile dose of your medication or vaccine (usually in a small, labeled vial) A suitable syringe with a sterile needle tip. Depending on the size of your patient and the amount of medication to be administered, you may choose to use one of the following configurations or another safe, sterile means of injection: A 0.5, 1, or 2 cc syringe with a 27-gauge needle A 3 cc luer lock syringe (for large doses) A pre-filled, disposable syringe A sterile gauze pad (usually 2 x 2 inch) A sterile adhesive bandage (note - make sure the patient is not allergic to the adhesive, as can lead to irritation near the wound) A clean towel 2 Ensure you have the correct medication and Continue reading >>

Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot For Diabetes

Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot For Diabetes

For those with diabetes, an insulin shot delivers medicine into the subcutaneous tissue -- the tissue between your skin and muscle. Subcutaneous tissue (also called "sub Q" tissue) is found throughout your body. Please follow these steps when using an insulin syringe. Note: these instructions are not for patients using an insulin pen or a non-needle injection system. Select a clean, dry work area, and gather the following insulin supplies: Bottle of insulin Sterile insulin syringe (needle attached) with wrapper removed Two alcohol wipes (or cotton balls and a bottle of rubbing alcohol) One container for used equipment (such as a hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly secured lid or a commercial "sharps" container) Wash hands with soap and warm water and dry them with a clean towel. Remove the plastic cap from the insulin bottle. Roll the bottle of insulin between your hands two to three times to mix the insulin. Do not shake the bottle, as air bubbles can form and affect the amount of insulin withdrawn. Wipe off the rubber part on the top of the insulin bottle with an alcohol pad or cotton ball dampened with alcohol. Set the insulin bottle nearby on a flat surface. Remove the cap from the needle. If you've been prescribed two types of insulin to be taken at once (mixed dose), skip to the instructions in the next section. Draw the required number of units of air into the syringe by pulling the plunger back. You need to draw the same amount of air into the syringe as insulin you need to inject. Always measure from the top of the plunger. Insert the needle into the rubber stopper of the insulin bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the bottle (this allows the insulin to be drawn more easily). Leave the needle in the bottle. Turn the bottle an Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

How To Give A Dog An Injection Under The Skin

How To Give A Dog An Injection Under The Skin

Dogs with diabetes or severe allergies need daily injections. It's not really fun to stick a needle in your best friend, but it's easier for both of you than dragging him to the vet daily to protect his health or keep him alive. Prep 5 Wet a cotton ball with alcohol and wipe the top of the medication vial; allow it to dry. Draw 1 Uncap the needle end of the syringe. Keep the needle cap -- you'll need it later. 2 Hold the medication vial in your left hand and the syringe in your right hand (reverse sides if you're a left-handed). 4 Turn the vial upside down on your left palm between your thumb and fingers with the needle in place. 5 Place your right thumb under one of the flanges on the end of the syringe barrel and curl your right fingers around the colored plunger. 6 Push upward on the flange slowly and smoothly with your thumb while pulling the plunger back with your fingers -- it sounds tricky doing three things with two hands, but a little practice with a used syringe and an orange or lemon will give you confidence. 7 Keep the vial and the syringe upside down in your left hand while you check the medication in the syringe for air bubbles. If you see any, tap the syringe lightly with a finger until the bubbles rise to the base of the needle. 8 Press gently on the plunger until the bubbles disappear into the vial. Check the medication level in the syringe to be sure the dose is still correct. If there's not enough, pull gently on the plunger until it holds the correct amount. 9 Withdraw the needle from the vial, replace the needle cap and lay the loaded syringe aside. Shoot 1 Get your dog into a comfortable position. This can be on a table, the sofa or the floor, just so you can reach the back of his neck with both hands. You may need someone to help you by distractin Continue reading >>

How To Give An Insulin Injection

How To Give An Insulin Injection

A person with Type 1 diabetes requires daily doses of insulin to keep blood glucose levels from going too high. This means learning to inject the insulin with a small needle into specific sites on the body. The technique is usually taught by your healthcare professional or diabetes educator, who makes sure that you administer the insulin correctly. Sometimes people with Type 2 will also need insulin injections to control their blood glucose. Follow this "how to" to refresh your technique. How to Give an Injection Gather your supplies together: an insulin syringe, your bottle (or bottles, if you're mixing two insulins) of insulin, an alcohol wipe. For ease in locating supplies, always keep your supplies in a small container or bag in the same place. Insulin should be refrigerated.​ Check the insulin bottle, make sure it is the right insulin. When you first open an insulin bottle, write the date on it. When the bottle is 30 days old, you should discard whatever insulin is left. It loses its potency after 30 days. Wash your hands with soap and water. Make sure to dry them thoroughly. Take the bottle of insulin between your hands and roll it gently back and forth. This is especially important for cloudy insulins to thoroughly mix the contents. Don't shake an insulin bottle. The insulin is fragile and could be damaged by rough handling. Open an alcohol wipe and swab the top of the insulin bottle. If the bottle has not been opened yet, remove the protective cover. It usually will pop off with a little upward pressure. Pick up your syringe in one hand. With the other hand, grasp the needle cap firmly between your thumb and forefinger. Pull the cap straight off, without touching the needle. Note how many units of insulin you'll be injecting. Pull the plunger of the syringe ba Continue reading >>

Insulin U-100 Vials: How To Inject A Dose Subcutaneously

Insulin U-100 Vials: How To Inject A Dose Subcutaneously

This video is restricted from playing on your current domain Let’s take a minute to talk about giving an insulin injection into subcutaneous tissue. Subcutaneous tissue is the natural layer of fat just under the skin. You can follow these basic steps, unless your doctor recommends otherwise. To start: - Wash your hands. - Next, gather your supplies. You’ll need alcohol swabs, insulin, an insulin syringe and needle, and a “sharps container” for used needles. - Read the label. - Stop here to make sure you have the correct insulin and that you know the exact dose. Also, check your syringe and needle. It is very important to always use insulin syringes to measure insulin. Now, prepare the supplies: - Clean the rubber stopper in the vial with a new alcohol swab. - Carefully remove the cap from the needle. - Pull the plunger back until you have the same amount of air in the syringe as you will need for the dose of medicine. Next, prepare the dose: - If instructed, gently roll the vial to mix. - Gently push the needle straight through the rubber stopper in the vial. - Then, push the plunger to transfer the air from the syringe into the vial. - Keep the needle in the vial, and rotate the vial upside down. The needle tip should be pointing towards the ceiling. It should also be IN the medicine. - Slowly pull back on the plunger to draw the correct dose into the syringe. If you see air bubbles in the syringe, you need to get rid of them. To do so, tap the syringe until the air bubbles are at the base of the needle. Then, push them back into the vial. Draw the dose again, and make sure there are no air bubbles. - Remove the needle from the vial, and don’t let the needle touch anything. Next, get the skin ready: - Choose an area as directed. The preferred area is usually Continue reading >>

Injection

Injection

injection [in-jek´shun] 2. the forcing of a liquid into a part, as into the subcutaneous tissues, the vascular tree, or an organ. 3. a substance so forced or administered; in pharmacy, a solution of a medicament suitable for injection. Immunizing substances, or inoculations, are generally given by injection. Some medicines cannot be given by mouth because chemical action of the enzymes and digestive fluids would change or reduce their effectiveness, or because they would be removed from the body too quickly to have any effect. Occasionally a medication is injected so that it will act more quickly. In addition to the most common types of injections described below, injections are sometimes made into arteries, bone marrow, the spine, the sternum, the pleural space of the chest region, the peritoneal cavity, and joint spaces. In sudden heart failure, heart-stimulating drugs may be injected directly into the heart (intracardiac injection). intradermal injection injection of small amounts of material into the corium or substance of the skin, done in diagnostic procedures and in administration of regional anesthetics, as well as in treatment procedures. In certain allergy tests, the allergen is injected intracutaneously. These injections are given in an area where the skin and hair are sparse, usually on the inner part of the forearm. A 25-gauge needle, about 1 cm long, is usually used and is inserted at a 10- to 15-degree angle to the skin. intramuscular injection injection into the substance of a muscle, usually the muscle of the upper arm, thigh, or buttock. Intramuscular injections are given when the substance is to be absorbed quickly. They should be given with extreme care, especially in the buttock, because the sciatic nerve may be injured or a large blood vessel may Continue reading >>

How To Give Injections To Cats

How To Give Injections To Cats

Daily injections of insulin for your cat? The thought may at seem daunting, but with practice the injecting of insulin in your cat will become second nature. These instructions will give you the information you need to perform injections of cat insulin with confidence. Pre-Injection Establish a pleasant routine: You should be injecting at about the same time every day. Begin with petting or grooming or maybe even a low-carb, high protein treat. (Or a tiny amount of anything they love.) At first, keep the syringe hidden or disguised. Cats do not have the clearest eyesight, so you have some leeway here. As long as the syringe is not initially in my hand ( I hold it sideways by the barrel in my mouth!), Austin is OK with my approach. After the cat becomes used to the routine, you probably won't have to do this. Many cats can be trained by verbal commands to come get their shots. If hiding the syringe while you play is too hard, consider using the CAPPED syringe to rub all over your cat. Austin liked to have his face scratched with it, but I do have a little trouble getting him to leave the syringe alone once I uncap it for the injection. Get on the same level as your cat: you down on the floor, cat up on a bed or counter, or in your lap. Do not assume a threatening posture (e.g. looming over the cat.) Make yourself comfortable:Get into a comfortable position, and make sure your body is in a position relative to the cat that makes injection easy. For example, if you plan to inject in the neck with your right hand, make sure the cat is facing toward your left or at a right angle to you. Performing the Injection Keep your movements smooth. Tent the cat's skin: Grasp the cat's skin between your thumb and index finger (fingers about an inch apart) and pinch firmly to tent the s Continue reading >>

Basic Instructions For Subcutaneous Injections In Rabbits

Basic Instructions For Subcutaneous Injections In Rabbits

Before giving medication to a rabbit, the nursing person should prepare the needed material and relax as much as possible. Indeed, rabbits can sense nervousness and stress and will be tense or run away when the person approaches to give the medication. On a table prepare: •The medication, •The syringe, packed in a sterile plastic, •The sterile new needle (gauge 23-27), protected in the needle cap. Detail of an 1 ml insulin syringe Insulin syringe and short needle for subcutaneous injections Drawing medicine from a sealed bottle or glass vial Various medications, like antibiotics, are available in sterile injectable liquid solutions, stored in glass or plastic vials closed with a rubber stopper and sealed with an aluminum ring. The sealing and stopper should never be removed. Indeed, once the vial opened, the solution is not sterile anymore. Gentle rolling of the medication bottle between the palms of the hand Bottle of sterile liquid medicine, before first use Before taking the right amount of medication out of the bottle, the medication needs to be mixed in the vial or to be warmed up, if stored in the refrigerator. Take the vial and roll it gently between the palms of the hand. During this step, the bottle containing the medication should never be shaken. This will cause: •The formation of bubbles that make extracting the medication harder, •The inability to get an accurate measurement, •The addition of air into the volume of medication to be given, decreasing the effective dosage, •The presence of air in the subcutaneous tissue, after injection. When the bottle is new and used for the first time, the protective aluminum cover must be broken off. It is then verified that the appropriate sterile needle and syringe are used. It is possible to use the same Continue reading >>

'belly Bottom': A Graphic Warning Of What Happens When Diabetics Inject Insulin At The Same Site Every Day

'belly Bottom': A Graphic Warning Of What Happens When Diabetics Inject Insulin At The Same Site Every Day

A 55-year-old man with type 1 diabetes shocked his doctors, after he revealed what looked like two bottom cheeks hanging below his navel. The patient from South Africa, had been told to inject his life-saving insulin jabs into two areas of his stomach to control his blood-sugar levels. However, he hadn't realised that he needed to rotate the injection site around different parts of his body because the hormone insulin encourages the build up of soft fatty swellings within the layers of the skin. The man went on to develop 'firm and pendulous' masses on his stomach - a condition known as lipohypertrophy. Mild cases are surprisingly common, however this patient had a severe case as he hadn't changed his injection sites for three decades. Dr Stan Landau, from the Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology in Joannesburg, was part of the team who treated the patient. He told Mail Online: 'We are a group of five senior doctors with many years experience between us and have never seen such a case before. 'We felt we needed to publish the picture in a journal because it was such an extreme case.' Dr Landau said the patient had continued to inject himself in his stomach because he thought the lumps were normal in insulin users. 'He had seen others with similar, but smaller masses in the same location. Sadly the lumps, though painless, had never been inspected,' the expert said. Dr Landau added that although the lumps may shrink slightly the disfiguration would be permanent without plastic surgery. The patient was encouraged to rotate the injection-site and use a smaller needle. He was also given a different type of insulin. Unfortunately the team lost contact with the patient after he failed to return for follow-up appointments. Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine, the te Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Insulin Administration Tips

Diabetes, Insulin Administration Tips

If your pet has diabetes, your veterinarian may have prescribed insulin for her. Some pet owners balk at the idea of giving their pet a regular injection, but the types of syringes used, the small amount injected, and the ease of injecting subcutaneously ensure that most pet owners can quickly learn to give the most comfortable injection possible. Insulin measurement: The concentration of insulin is measured in units. Insulin syringes are marked in units, and may also be marked in milliliters. Be sure to use the unit scale. Also, be sure you are using the appropriate insulin syringe for the concentration of insulin you are using. Insulin is available in concentrations of 40 and 100 units/ml. There are corresponding syringes to use for the measurement of the two concentrations of insulin. Pharmacy Note: Insulin comes in a glass vial with a rubber stopper, and must be stored in the refrigerator. Do not use the insulin beyond its expiration date. Different insulin types require different syringes: It is imperative to measure and administer the correct dose of insulin using the correct syringe. For instance, if you use insulin with 40 U/ml, you must measure and administer it with a U-40 syringe; if you used a U-100 syringe, it would result in the wrong amount of insulin being given, with perhaps a fatal outcome. Find out from your veterinarian (or pharmacist) what syringes are available for you to use with the concentration of insulin your pet is receiving. Pharmacy Note: An insulin syringe has 4 basic parts: the barrel, plunger, needle, and needle guard. Many brands of syringes have the needle permanently attached to the syringe barrel so it cannot be removed. How to draw up insulin for your pet: Prior to removing a dose of insulin from the vial, mix the contents by gently Continue reading >>

Lumps And Bumps From Insulin Therapy

Lumps And Bumps From Insulin Therapy

What are these lumps and bumps at my injection sites? Lumps and bumps from insulin are called lipohypertrophy. This is a medical word for a lump under the skin from an accumulation of fat at the site of many insulin injections. Scar tissue may also develop at the sites. Why does this happen? This happens due to the action of insulin on the fat cells. Insulin can actually cause fat cells to increase in size. It is generally seen when one uses the same area for insulin injection or infusion. It happens most often in areas that are easiest to inject insulin or place infusion sets-on both sides of the belly button and on the sides of the thighs. What happens when you have this? You may notice a thickening of this skin and areas of lumps and bumps. This was more evident with the older preparations of insulin where the skin changes were more evident. The changes may be very subtle with the newer insulin analogs so it is important to actually feel the areas that you use to inject or infuse insulin. You want to firmly stroke the areas in a sweeping motion to feel for any lumps. Does it affect your glucose control? Infusing insulin into areas of lipohypertrophy can affect your glucose control. Insulin is not always well-absorbed in these areas. You may find that your glucose control is not what you expect it to be. The more damaged the area is the more likely it is that glucose control will be affected. Sometimes the areas of lipohypertrophy have damaged nerve endings and you don’t feel your infusion set going it at all. This is clearly a sign of a damaged area. How is it prevented? Rotate your infusion sites! It is important to use different sites to prevent lipohypertrophy. You might want to use a calendar or body map to be sure that you are rotating you sites frequently. Av Continue reading >>

“help! There’s A Lump Where I Inject Insulin”

“help! There’s A Lump Where I Inject Insulin”

It might be a sign of lipohypertrophy, a condition that affects insulin absorption. Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Insulin Nation hosts a regular Q&A column from IDS that answers questions submitted from the Type 1 diabetes community. Q – Every time I think I know what I’m talking about when it comes to diabetes, I come across a new thing to worry about. I saw something about lipohypertrophy. What is it and should I worry about it? A – Lipohypertrophy is when fatty lumps appear on the surface, or just under the surface, of the skin. This is a fairly common side effect from insulin injections or insulin pump sites. It is more likely to occur if injections are administered to roughly the same part of the skin over a period of time, or if the same patch of body real estate is used for pump infusion sets over and over again. When the skin becomes lumpy, the insulin injected or pumped into this area won’t be absorbed as consistently as it once was, which can mean it will take longer to be absorbed or it will be inadequately absorbed. This can lead to higher than usual blood glucose levels. The signs of lipohypertrophy are a raised area of the skin at the injection or infusion site. The raised area may cover a wide area – up to an inch in diameter. The skin affected will feel more firm than the skin elsewhere on your body. The best treatment for lipohypertrophy is to avoid injecting or applying infusion sets in the affected area of skin until it has fully healed. Prevention is easier than dealing with lipohypertrophy after the fact. Make sure you pick a different area of skin for each injection and rotate your injection and infusion sites. Ideally, you Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy

Insulin Therapy

Why do I need to take insulin? When you digest food, your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells of your body and be used as energy. When you have diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use it properly, so the glucose builds up in your blood instead of moving into the cells. Too much glucose in the blood can lead to serious health problems. All people who have type 1 diabetes and some people who have type 2 diabetes need to take insulin to help control their blood sugar levels. The goal of taking insulin is to keep your blood sugar level in a normal range as much as possible so you’ll stay healthy. Insulin can’t be taken by mouth. It is usually taken with injections (shots). It can also be taken with an insulin pen or an insulin pump. How often will I need to take insulin? You and your doctor will develop a schedule that is right for you. Most people who have diabetes and take insulin need at least 2 insulin shots a day for good blood sugar control. Some people need 3 or 4 shots a day. Do I need to monitor my blood sugar level? Yes. Monitoring and controlling your blood sugar is key to preventing the complications of diabetes. If you don’t already monitor your blood sugar level, you will need to learn how. Checking your blood sugar involves pricking your finger to get a small drop of blood that you put on a test strip. You can read the results yourself or insert the strip into a machine called an electronic glucose meter. The results will tell you whether or not your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Your doctor will give you additional information about monitoring your blood sugar. When should I take insulin? You and your doctor should discuss when and how you Continue reading >>

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

If you have type 1 diabetes, or if you have type 2 and have recently begun injecting insulin, you may have a bit of trouble getting used to the process of preparing and administering your own insulin shots. Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, of the Joslin Diabetes Center, says that injection technique is important to master not only for accurate dosing, but for comfort, too. "With proper practice and good technique, you can avoid pain during an injection," she states. Penney sat down with us recently to answer some common questions about insulin injection. If after reading and practicing insulin injections you still find you’re having trouble, Penney suggests seeing a Certified Diabetes Educator for more assistance. Q: How do I decide where to inject? A: People often select injection sites based on many factors: accessibility, presence of fatty tissue, and rate of insulin absorption (which will be discussed shortly). As a result, popular sites for injection include the stomach, outer thigh, the back of the arm (between the shoulder and the elbow), or the upper outside "wallet" area of the buttock (but not into the lower buttock area). Q: Once I decide on a location for an injection, how do I pick the right "spot"? A: Here are some easy guidelines: -Stomach If you’re going to inject into the stomach, stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton and/or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. -Thigh For an injection in your thigh, inject at least four inches or about one hand’s width above the knee and at least four inches down from the top of the leg. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the large number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. - Arm The area between the shoulder and elbow on the outside of the arm is usua Continue reading >>

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