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Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t The Answer To High Insulin Prices

Why Walmart Insulins Aren’t The Answer To High Insulin Prices

A diabetes advocate contrasts the performance of generic insulins versus the more popular brands. Commentary Some people don’t understand why people with diabetes get upset at the price of insulin. They see insulin for sale at a relatively reasonable price in Walmart and don’t see the problem. What they don’t know is that these Walmart insulins just don’t perform nearly as well as the more expensive insulins, and that gap in performance can have a very negative effect on the health of people with diabetes. There are three insulins available at Walmart for the price of $25 – NPH, Regular, and 70/30 (a mix of the two). NPH was first approved by the FDA in 1950, Regular was approved in 1982, 70/30 in 1989. That means NPH has been around for 66 years, Regular for 33 years, 70/30 for 27 years. Take a moment and think about what healthcare was like in 1950. Now, I’m sure someone is saying, “Well, they must still work if they are still being sold.” And they do, but they don’t work in the same way. These insulins are not interchangeable. If a person with Type 1 diabetes were to switch from a Humalog/Lantus insulin regimen to Regular and NPH, it would drastically alter their lifestyle, making blood sugar control more irregular and raising A1C scores. The biggest issue is that whereas Lantus is steady, NPH peaks. A person using NPH must keep a very set dietary schedule, making sure to eat meals and snacks at certain times to correspond with peak times of an insulin dose. The strict schedule is difficult for everyone, but especially for children. They are unable to alter their daily schedules and must always be sure to eat at specific times. Even if they’re not hungry, they must eat to avoid low blood sugar. And if they are hungry, they often cannot have more t Continue reading >>

How To Use Basal Insulin: Benefits, Types, And Dosage

How To Use Basal Insulin: Benefits, Types, And Dosage

Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas that is responsible for regulating blood sugar levels. Diabetes is a condition where the body doesn't make enough insulin or can't use it properly. People diagnosed with diabetes benefit from increasing their body's natural insulin levels by injecting insulin. Different types of insulin are available. They can be classed by: how quickly they work (onset time) how long their effects last (duration) when they peak (peak time) Basal insulin is one type of insulin that is available, and it plays a vital role in managing diabetes. Contents of this article: What is basal insulin? Basal insulin is also known as background insulin. It helps to keep blood sugar levels stable during periods of fasting, such as between meals or during sleep. During these times, the body keeps releasing sugar (also known as glucose) into the bloodstream. This gives energy to the body's cells. Basal insulin helps to keep levels of this glucose in check. The insulin reaches the bloodstream several hours after injection. It keeps glucose levels constant throughout the day and night. In general, basal insulin remains in the system for 18-24 hours. Types of basal insulin There are two main types of basal insulin: Long-acting insulin This type of insulin may be recommended for several types of diabetes. It generally acts in the body for up to 24 hours, although some types can last longer than this. Depending on the type of insulin used and patient needs, long-acting basal insulin should be injected either once or twice daily. Long-acting insulin tends to have no peak activity and mimics the natural function of the pancreas. It allows for consistent delivery, keeping blood sugar levels steady throughout the day and night. The three types of long-acting insulin are Continue reading >>

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

Information Regarding Insulin Storage And Switching Between Products In An Emergency

en Español Insulin Storage and Effectiveness Insulin for Injection Insulin from various manufacturers is often made available to patients in an emergency and may be different from a patient's usual insulin. After a disaster, patients in the affected area may not have access to refrigeration. According to the product labels from all three U.S. insulin manufacturers, it is recommended that insulin be stored in a refrigerator at approximately 36°F to 46°F. Unopened and stored in this manner, these products maintain potency until the expiration date on the package. Insulin products contained in vials or cartridges supplied by the manufacturers (opened or unopened) may be left unrefrigerated at a temperature between 59°F and 86°F for up to 28 days and continue to work. However, an insulin product that has been altered for the purpose of dilution or by removal from the manufacturer’s original vial should be discarded within two weeks. Note: Insulin loses some effectiveness when exposed to extreme temperatures. The longer the exposure to extreme temperatures, the less effective the insulin becomes. This can result in loss of blood glucose control over time. Under emergency conditions, you might still need to use insulin that has been stored above 86°F. You should try to keep insulin as cool as possible. If you are using ice, avoid freezing the insulin. Do not use insulin that has been frozen. Keep insulin away from direct heat and out of direct sunlight. When properly stored insulin becomes available again, the insulin vials that have been exposed to these extreme conditions should be discarded and replaced as soon as possible. If patients or healthcare providers have specific questions about the suitability of their insulin, they may call the respective manufacturer a Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin Used To Support Background Therapy

Types Of Insulin Used To Support Background Therapy

When it comes to taking insulin, there are several forms of the hormone which are differentiated by the speed in which they act. This, in turn, determines when and how each form is used. Anyone with type 1 diabetes, and some with type 2 diabetes, need to take insulin to more effectively process the glucose from food. With type 1 diabetes, this is because the pancreas can no longer make the hormone. With type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is able to make insulin, but the body no longer responds to it as it should and will need additional insulin to compensate. Role of Long- and Short-Acting Insulins Insulin is given in long-acting forms to ensure more a steady regulation of insulin levels, while short-acting forms aim to lower sudden spikes in blood sugar. We refer to the longer-acting form as basal insulin (basal meaning "background") since it works in the background to the keep the blood sugar stable. Shorter-acting forms are called bolus insulin (bolus meaning "single dose") since it is meant to be taken specifically at meal times to keep blood sugar levels under control. How Bolus Insulin Works Bolus insulin refers to the extra amount of insulin the pancreas would normally produce in response to sugar (glucose) taken in through food. The level of production depends largely on the size and type of meal involved. In persons with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin as the beta cells which produce the hormone have largely shut down. Because of this, bolus insulin will be used, when needed, to compensate for this loss. To ensure the ongoing normalization of blood sugar levels, many people will often follow a basal-bolus regimen in which several shots of each are taken throughout the day for both background and mealtime maintenance purposes. Bolus in Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Insulin Medication For Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin Medication For Type 1 Diabetes

Key points All people with Type 1 diabetes must take insulin medication. Insulin is a naturally occurring body hormone. Taking insulin by injection is designed to try to mimic the way your body would produce its own insulin (if you didn’t have diabetes). There are a number of different types of insulin that vary in the length of time they are absorbed into and continue to act in your body. When you are starting on insulin you will get lots of help and support from your local specialist diabetes service. It is essential to have a variety of skills to manage being on insulin. There are specialist diabetes nurses available to help you gain these skills. Your insulin therapy can be tailored to fit with your own particular lifestyle. If you are newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes or you are thinking about making a change to your current insulin, always work closely with your specialist diabetes team. When you have Type 1 diabetes, your body can’t produce its own insulin. Insulin is a body hormone that needs to circulate in your blood stream to do its job properly. If you don’t have enough insulin your body is unable to use or store glucose properly. When you have Type 1 diabetes, you need to take your insulin by injection (under the skin). Many people wonder why it is not possible to take insulin as a tablet. Insulin cannot be taken as a tablet, because when it is, it gets broken down in your gut and ceases to be insulin. In some countries research has been done into giving insulin in an inhaled form (similar to an inhaler used for asthma drugs). This has been somewhat successful, but there are still problems with this system and it is not widely available commercially. Most people feel very anxious when they first find out that they need to start taking insulin. But Continue reading >>

Basal Insulin Types, Benefits, Dosage Information, And Side Effects

Basal Insulin Types, Benefits, Dosage Information, And Side Effects

The primary job of basal insulin is to keep your blood glucose levels stable during periods of fasting, such as while you’re sleeping. While fasting, your liver continuously secretes glucose into the bloodstream. Basal insulin keeps these glucose levels under control. Without this insulin, your glucose levels would rise at an alarming rate. Basal insulin ensures that your cells are fed with a constant stream of glucose to burn for energy throughout the day. Here’s what you need to know about basal insulin medication and why it’s important for managing diabetes. Types There are three main types of basal insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin, NPH Brand-name versions include Humulin and Novolin. This insulin is administered once or twice daily. It’s usually mixed with mealtime insulin in the morning, before your evening meal, or both. It works hardest in the 4 to 8 hours after injection, and the effects start waning after about 16 hours. Long-acting insulin Two types of this insulin currently on the market are detemir (Levemir) and glargine (Lantus). This basal insulin begins working 90 minutes to 4 hours after injection and remains in your bloodstream for up to 24 hours. It may start weakening a few hours earlier for some people or last a few hours longer for others. There isn’t a peak time for this type of insulin. It works at a steady rate throughout the day. Ultra-long acting insulin In January 2016, another basal insulin called degludec (Tresiba) was released. This basal insulin begins working within 30 to 90 minutes and remains in your bloodstream for up to 42 hours. As with the long-acting insulins detemir and glargine, there isn’t a peak time for this insulin. It works at a steady rate throughout the day. Insulin degludec is available in two strengths, 1 Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Disclaimer - This content has been created for information purposes only, please consult your doctor before taking any decision on diabetes management. Although great care has been taken in compiling and checking the information, Johnson and Johnson Ltd., and its associates shall not be responsible, or in any way liable for any errors, omissions or inaccuracies in this publication whether arising from negligence or otherwise however, or for any consequence arising there from. WHAT ARE DIFFERENT KINDS OF INSULIN AND HOW THEY WORK? Some types of insulin act quickly to match the rise in blood glucose after a meal. Other types act more slowly to control blood glucose throughout the night and day. Your doctor will prescribe the insulin that is best for you. A basal insulin dose provides long-lasting control of overnight and fasting (morning) glucose levels. Bolus doses provide control of more immediate rises in glucose levels. For example, to cover meals. A late-day basal insulin injection is a common first step in insulin therapy. Throughout the day your body may still be able to keep your blood glucose under control with or without diabetes pills. But you may need a basal insulin injection to help keep your glucose steady throughout the night. A pre-mixed insulin is a combination of a basal insulin and a fast-acting insulin that offers the convenience of both precise and consistent dosing. Insulin type - BASAL When it starts working When it works at peak How long it lasts Long-acting Usually taken at bedtime to control glucose while you sleep 3-4 Hours 8-15 Hours 22-26 Hours Intermediate acting Usually taken in the morning to work all day 1-3 Hours 5-8 Hours Up to 18 Hours When to self-monitor your blood glucose Insulin type - BASAL When to self-monitor blood glucose Long- Continue reading >>

Fast-acting Insulin

Fast-acting Insulin

Even when you think you’re doing everything right with your diabetes care regimen, it can sometimes seem like your blood glucose levels are hard to control. One potential source of difficulty that you may not have thought of is how you time your injections or boluses of rapid-acting insulin with respect to meals. Since the first rapid-acting insulin, insulin lispro (brand name Humalog), came on the market in 1996, most diabetes experts have recommended taking it within 15 minutes of starting a meal (any time between 15 minutes before starting to eat to 15 minutes after starting to eat). This advice is based on the belief that rapid-acting insulin is absorbed quickly and begins lowering blood glucose quickly. However, several years of experience and observation suggest that this advice may not be ideal for everyone who uses rapid-acting insulin. As a result, the advice on when to take it needs updating. Insulin basics The goal of insulin therapy is to match the way that insulin is normally secreted in people without diabetes. Basal insulin. Small amounts of insulin are released by the pancreas 24 hours a day. On average, adults secrete about one unit of insulin per hour regardless of food intake. Bolus insulin. In response to food, larger amounts of insulin are secreted and released in two-phase boluses. The first phase starts within minutes of the first bite of food and lasts about 15 minutes. The second phase of insulin release is more gradual and occurs over the next hour and a half to three hours. The amount of insulin that is released matches the rise in blood glucose from the food that is eaten. In people with normal insulin secretion, insulin production and release is a finely tuned feedback system that maintains blood glucose between about 70 mg/dl and 140 mg/d Continue reading >>

An Overview Of Insulin Pumps And Glucose Sensors For The Generalist

An Overview Of Insulin Pumps And Glucose Sensors For The Generalist

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetes is rapidly becoming a major health epidemic in most regions of the world [1]. All patients with type 1 diabetes and a significant number with type 2 diabetes require the use of insulin for controlling blood glucose. In the last 20 years, technological innovation and bioengineering has transformed the diabetes therapeutic landscape. There are several varieties of insulin and many different injection regimens that can be used. However, in spite of the availability of insulin vials and pens, the acceptability for patients and the glucose readings that are obtained with the use of single or multiple-dose injection regimens is not to the desired level. Insulin delivery with pumps, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), was introduced almost a half century ago. It utilizes short- or rapid-acting insulin types only, thus minimizing variability of administration and reducing the chances of glucose fluctuations. Pump technology has progressed to the level of precisely mimicking physiological demands. Programmable insulin administration in basal and bolus fashion is integrated and augmented with glucose biosensors to provide real-time, data-driven glycemic control and early detection of hypoglycemia. The prospect of a functional, closed-loop “artificial pancreas” with implantable or bionic capabilities is now within the realm of technological possibility in the near future. Continue reading >>

Insulin Analogs

Insulin Analogs

Insulin analogs are now replacing human insulin in the US. Insulins are categorized by differences in onset, peak, duration, concentration, and route of delivery. An analog refers to something that is “analogous” or similar to something else. Therefore, “insulin” analogs are analogs that have been designed to mimic the body’s natural pattern of insulin release. These synthetic-made insulins are called analogs of human insulin. However, they have minor structural or amino acid changes that give them special desirable characteristics when injected under the skin. Once absorbed, they act on cells like human insulin, but are absorbed from fatty tissue more predictably. In this section, you will find information about: Rapid-acting injected insulin analog The fastest-working insulins are referred to as rapid-acting insulin. They include: These insulin analogs enter the bloodstream within minutes, so it is important to inject them within 5 to 10 minutes of eating. They have a peak action period of 60-120 minutes, and fade completely after about four hours. Higher doses may last slightly longer, but will last no more than five or six hours. Rapid acting insulin analogs are ideal for bolus insulin replacement. They are given at mealtimes and for high blood sugar correction. Rapid-acting insulins are used in insulin pumps, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) devices. When delivered through a CSII pump, the rapid-acting insulins provide the basal insulin replacement, as well as the mealtime and high blood sugar correction insulin replacement. The insulins that work for the longest period of time are referred to as long-acting insulin. They provide relatively constant insulin levels that plateau for many hours after injection. Sometimes these in Continue reading >>

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap

When You Can't Afford The Insulin That You Need To Survive | How To Use The Cheap "old-school" Insulin

Note: BootCamp for Betics is not a medical center. Anything you read on this site should not be considered medical advice, and is for educational purposes only. Always consult with a physician or a diabetes nurse educator before starting or changing insulin doses. Did you know that all type 1 diabetics and some type 2 diabetics need injectable insulin in order to live? Put another way, if a diabetic needs insulin in order to live, and the diabetic does not get insulin, the diabetic will die. Diabetic death from Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a grisly process, during which acid starts running through your bloodstream, searing your vessels and organs while your body shrivels up in dehydration as it tries to push the acid out of your body through your urine and lungs, and, left untreated, the condition shuts down your organs one by one until you are dead. If you're lucky, your brain will be the first thing to swell itself into a coma and you'll be unconscious for the remainder of the organ failures. In some cases, this grisly diabetic death can take a few days or weeks to complete its process. Or, if you're one of the luckier less-resistant insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, you may actually get away with staying alive for quite a few years and suffer only some heart disease, stroke, kidney damage/failure, neuropathy, limb amputations and blindness. (my intent in describing how lack of insulin leads to death is not to cause fear in people with diabetes or their loved ones; rather, my intent is to make clear the reality that injectable insulin is absolutely vital to diabetics who depend on injectable insulin to live) While I'd love to go off on a political rant about how insulin should be a basic human right for all insulin-dependent diabetics (and why the hell isn't it?), that' Continue reading >>

Insulin Types

Insulin Types

What Are the Different Insulin Types? Insulin Types are hormones normally made in the pancreas that stimulates the flow of sugar – glucose – from the blood into the cells of the body. Glucose provides the cells with the energy they need to function. There are two main groups of insulins used in the treatment of diabetes: human insulins and analog insulins, made by recombinant DNA technology. The concentration of most insulins available in the United States is 100 units per milliliter. A milliliter is equal to a cubic centimeter. All insulin syringes are graduated to match this insulin concentration. There are four categories of insulins depending on how quickly they start to work in the body after injection: Very rapid acting insulin, Regular, or Rapid acting insulins, Intermediate acting insulins, Long acting insulin. In addition, some insulins are marketed mixed together in different proportions to provide both rapid and long acting effects. Certain insulins can also be mixed together in the same syringe immediately prior to injection. Rapid Acting Insulins A very rapid acting form of insulin called Lispro insulin is marketed under the trade name of Humalog. A second form of very rapid acting insulin is called Aspart and is marketed under the trade name Novolog. Humalog and Novolog are clear liquids that begin to work 10 minutes after injection and peak at 1 hour after injection, lasting for 3-4 hours in the body. However, most patients also need a longer-acting insulin to maintain good control of their blood sugar. Humalog and Novolog can be mixed with NPH insulin and are used as “bolus” insulins to be given 15 minutes before a meal. Note: Check blood sugar level before giving Humalog or Novalog. Your doctor or diabetes educator will instruct you in determini Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin? Everything To Know If You Have Diabetes

What Is Insulin? Everything To Know If You Have Diabetes

When you think about diabetes in a general sense, your mind might immediately flash to finger pricks. But while insulin therapy is common, it’s not for everyone who has been diagnosed with the disease. Indeed, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only 18 percent of adults with the disease take insulin to manage diabetes, while 13 percent take insulin and oral medications. If you have type 2 diabetes, it’s important to understand the basics on insulin before making a decision with your doctor about whether you need it to control your blood sugar — including what it is, what it does, what its potential benefits are, and how to overcome the fear of finger pricks if you’ve been prescribed the therapy. What Does the Pancreas Do, and How Does Insulin Affect Blood Sugar Levels? The pancreas, a gland located deep in our abdomen, releases the hormone insulin. Insulin’s primary purpose is to help transport glucose, or blood sugar, to our liver, muscle, and fat cells to be used for energy or to be stored for later use, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. In people without diabetes, this process works smoothly, with the pancreas meeting the body’s demands for insulin and that sufficient insulin transporting glucose to cells. Consequently, blood sugar levels stay within a normal range. But when insulin resistance occurs, the body’s cells don’t respond correctly to insulin. With this condition — which can also occur in the absence of type 2 diabetes — the pancreas’s beta cells attempt to release more and more insulin to ferry glucose to cells. When beta cells aren’t able to meet the body’s demands for insulin, blood sugar accumulates, leading to diabetes and other health issues. How Continue reading >>

Insulin Basics

Insulin Basics

1-800-DIABETES www.diabetes.org DIABETES CARE TASKS AT SCHOOL: What Key Personnel Need to Know 1-800-DIABETES www.diabetes.org * Goal: Optimal Student Health and Learning Accurate and timely insulin dosing is a vital piece of a comprehensive plan. * This training component is one of thirteen components created specifically for school nurses and non-medical school personnel who perform diabetes care tasks at school. These components are: • Diabetes Basics • Diabetes Medical Management Plan • Hypoglycemia • Hyperglycemia • Blood Glucose Monitoring • Glucagon Administration • Insulin Basics • Insulin by Syringe and Vial • Insulin by Pen • Insulin by Pump • Ketones • Nutrition and Physical Activity • Legal Considerations This unit is Insulin Basics. 1-800-DIABETES www.diabetes.org Participants will be able to understand: What insulin does Types of insulin Insulin delivery methods Storing insulin Factors that influence insulin dosing Learning Objectives * Participants will be able to understand: What insulin does Types of insulin Insulin delivery methods Storing insulin Factors that influence insulin dosing School personnel responsible for performing diabetes care tasks or assisting with the student’s diabetes care tasks should know about and be trained in using and operating each student’s insulin delivery system. In the event a school nurse is not available to administer insulin, a nurse or another qualified health care professional should teach, monitor, and supervise trained diabetes personnel to administer insulin. School staff who will perform or assist students with insulin administration should understand how insulin works. 1-800-DIABETES www.diabetes.org Vocabulary Target Ran Continue reading >>

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