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Better Drugs Than Metformin

This Herb Is Better Than Metformin For Diabetes

This Herb Is Better Than Metformin For Diabetes

Last week, I told about the wonderful case of Rich. Hes a patient of mine with type-2 diabetes. Rich completely cured his diabetes by combining the program I describe in my book The Type-2 Diabetes Breakthrough with the herb berberine. Then I told you about a brand new study that showed that this herb has the same biochemical effect on muscle cells as insulin. This week, Id like to tell you about another study. This one shows that berberine might just be the best medication there is, natural or otherwise, for diabetes. This study looked at the effect of berberine on 36 patients. All of them were newly diagnosed cases of type-2 diabetes. Half of the patients took 500 mg, three times daily of the drug metformin (also known as Glucophage). The other half took berberine (berberine hydrochloride) in the same dose 500 mg, three times a day. Then the researchers measured the participants blood sugar levels for the next three months. Heres what happened: In terms of blood sugar control, both treatments worked equally as well. The fasting blood sugars went down 30%. And the sugar levels after eating (called the post prandial levels) went down even more 45%. But here's the really astounding thing about berberine. All of this happened within the first two to four weeks of taking the treatment. And unlike metformin, there were no side effects at all in any of the patients taking berberine. In addition to the sugar levels, the A1c levels went down as well a full 20%. That may not sound like a lot. But its a very significant improvement. In addition to the remarkable effects it had on blood sugar control, berberine had another important effect that metformin did not have. Triglycerides are the fats found in the blood stream that the cells metabolize for energy. Since type-2 diabetic Continue reading >>

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best?

Which Diabetes Drug Is Best?

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, July 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- No single drug to treat type 2 diabetes stands out from the pack when it comes to reducing the risks of heart disease, stroke or premature death, a new research review finds. The analysis of hundreds of clinical trials found no evidence that any one diabetes drug, or drug combination, beats out the others. Researchers said the results bolster current recommendations to first try an older, cheaper drug -- metformin (Glumetza, Glucophage) -- for most patients with type 2 diabetes. "There are very few things experts agree on, but this is one of them," said Dr. Kevin Pantalone, a diabetes specialist at the Cleveland Clinic and a member of the Endocrine Society. "Metformin, in the absence of contraindications or intolerability, should be the first-line agent to treat patients with type 2 diabetes," he said. Metformin can cause upset stomach and diarrhea, so some patients are unable to stick with it day to day, explained Pantalone, who wasn't involved in the study. And people with kidney disease generally shouldn't take it, he said. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes -- mostly type 2, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The disease, which is often linked to obesity, causes blood sugar levels to be chronically high. Over time, that can lead to complications, such as heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and nerve damage, the CDC says. There are numerous classes of medications that lower blood sugar levels. What's been unclear is whether any of those drugs work better than others in warding off diabetes complications and extending people's lives. The new analysis found no obvious winners. But the researchers also cautioned against drawing conclusions: The trials in the review w Continue reading >>

This Common Type 2 Diabetes Drug May Be Safer Than Others

This Common Type 2 Diabetes Drug May Be Safer Than Others

Metformin, the most frequently prescribed standalone drug for type 2 diabetes, is better for the heart than its closest competitors, a large analysis suggests. HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, April 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) — Metformin, the most frequently prescribed standalone drug for type 2 diabetes, is better for the heart than its closest competitors, a large analysis suggests. Metformin reduced the risk of dying from heart attack and stroke by about 30 percent to 40 percent compared with other commonly used drugs called sulfonylureas, such as glibenclamide, glimepiride, glipizide, and tolbutamide, researchers report. "Pharmaceutical companies continue to make new drugs to reduce blood sugar and improve on safety concerns of the older drugs," said senior study author Dr. Shari Bolen. But, "while adults with diabetes often need more than one medication to control blood sugar, the newer medications do not appear to be safer than the older drugs," added Bolen. Metformin is still the safest and most effective type 2 diabetes medication, said Bolen. She is an assistant professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University's Center for Health Care Research and Policy, in Cleveland. The analysis, which included 204 studies involving 1.4 million people, was published April 19 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. According to the researchers, although diabetes patients with uncontrolled blood sugar are at risk for dying from a heart attack or stroke, it hasn't been clear whether one diabetes drug is better than another in preventing these deaths. "The complications of untreated diabetes often outweigh these safety concerns, but consumers will need to weigh benefits and risks of the medications with their doctors when making diabetes treatment choices," Bolen said. Metformin, Continue reading >>

Top 6 Breakthrough Diabetes Treatments You May Have Missed

Top 6 Breakthrough Diabetes Treatments You May Have Missed

Are you concerned you might be diagnosed with diabetes one day? You are not alone. Diabetes and prediabetes are two of the top pressing health issues in the nation. The number of Americans who are at risk for diabetes is astounding: it is reported that close to 86 million people in the U.S. have prediabetes, meaning their blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates a person diagnosed at age 50 dies six years earlier than a person without diabetes. One in three American adults will have diabetes in the year 2050 if current trends continue. Close to 29 million Americans, or 9% of the population, currently have diabetes. The vast majority of people, about 90 to 95 percent of those diagnosed with diabetes, have type 2 diabetes, according to the ADA. Insulin is a hormone the body needs to utilize the glucose (sugar) from food to provide energy for the body. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either doesn't make enough insulin, there is resistance to the effects of insulin, or both. Treatment typically begins with oral metformin, a veteran drug that is the backbone of many diabetes treatment regimens. From there, different drug classes may be added to metformin, and for some patients, the use of insulin may become necessary. However, the latest diabetes news is encouraging. New drugs, improved monitoring devices and an understanding of how diet and exercise can impact diabetes is adding up to positive outcomes for patients. As reported in August 2014 from research in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, the vast majority of people with type 2 diabetes are living longer lives due to better medications and treatments for both the disease and the numerous complications that Continue reading >>

Metformin Safer For Type 2 Diabetes Than Newer Drugs

Metformin Safer For Type 2 Diabetes Than Newer Drugs

Metformin, one of the most popular drugs prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes that has been available as a generic for many years, is safer for the heart than many newer -– and more expensive -– drugs, according to a new analysis. The findings, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine based on a meta-analysis of the results of more than 200 other studies, indicate that metformin should be a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. “Pharmaceutical companies continue to make new drugs to reduce blood sugar and improve on safety concerns of the older drugs,” Shari Bolen, MD, a senior author of the new analysis and an assistant professor of medicine at the Case Western Reserve University’s Center for Health Care Research and Policy, said in a statement. But while adults with diabetes often need more than one medication to control blood sugar, the newer medications do not appear to be safer than the older drugs.” She added that metformin is the safest and most effective medication for type 2 diabetes. Moreover, metformin reduced the risk of adverse cardiovascular events compared to sulfonylureas, another class of commonly prescribed diabetes drugs. Metformin had a 30%-40% reduction in the relative risk of cardiovascular death compared with other diabetes medicines such as sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and insulin. In addition, metformin seemed to have a bigger effect on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidity than sulfonylureas. Other drugs included in the review were the newest classes of type 2 diabetes medications, including sodium–glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, and glucagonlike peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists. Although reduction of HbA1c blood sugar levels was similar across most o Continue reading >>

Insulin Usually Better Than Oral Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Usually Better Than Oral Drugs For Type 2 Diabetes

According to a study published in , the combination of insulin and metformin may not benefit individuals with type 2 diabetes. Although the combination results in less weight gain, improved blood glucose control and less need for insulin, the researchers state that further research is required in order to provide solid evidence regarding the benefits and harms, as well as the risks of premature death. The study was conducted by researchers from the Copenhagen Trial Unit, Steno Hospital and the Copenhagen University Hospital. At present, guidelines recommend metformin, an oral blood glucose reducing medication, for type 2 diabetics starting insulin treatment. The researchers examined 2,217 individuals aged 18+ with type 2 diabetes. Among the trials examined, the team found insufficient reports of important patient outcomes, such as total mortality and death from heart disease. According to 20 trials, levels of HbA1c (a measure of average blood glucose levels over time) were reduced when insulin and metformin was taken together. Furthermore, the researchers found that the combination of drugs considerably reduced weight gain and body mass index (BMI) by an average of 1.6 kg. The researchers state that additional studies are required in order to research the long term benefits and harms of the combination, as it increases the risk of severe hypoglycaemic attack. In this week's BMJ podcast, Trish Groves, the deputy editor of BMJ, talks to lead author Bianca Hemmingsen about how this study was able to draw on more data than prior studies, and how the researchers examined major complications and mortality instead of surrogate outcomes, such as blood sugar levels and weight. In addition, Dr. Hemmingsen highlights the insufficient evidence for determining if the combination or Continue reading >>

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

A Complete List Of Diabetes Medications

Diabetes is a condition that leads to high levels of blood glucose (or sugar) in the body. This happens when your body can’t make or use insulin like it’s supposed to. Insulin is a substance that helps your body use the sugar from the food you eat. There are two different types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. People with both types of diabetes need medications to help keep their blood sugar levels normal. The types of drugs that can treat you depend on the type of diabetes you have. This article gives you information about drugs that treat both types of diabetes to help give you an idea of the treatment options available to you. Insulin Insulin is the most common type of medication used in type 1 diabetes treatment. It’s also used in type 2 diabetes treatment. It’s given by injection and comes in different types. The type of insulin you need depends on how severe your insulin depletion is. Options include: Short-acting insulin regular insulin (Humulin and Novolin) Rapid-acting insulins Intermediate-acting insulin Long-acting insulins Combination insulins NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine-insulin aspart) Humalog Mix 75/25 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humalog Mix 50/50 (insulin lispro protamine-insulin lispro) Humulin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Novolin 70/30 (human insulin NPH-human insulin regular) Ryzodeg (insulin degludec-insulin aspart) Amylinomimetic drug Pramlintide (SymlinPen 120, SymlinPen 60) is an amylinomimetic drug. It’s an injectable drug used before meals. It works by delaying the time your stomach takes to empty itself. It reduces glucagon secretion after meals. This lowers your blood sugar. It also reduces appetite through a central mechanism. Most medications for type 2 diabetes are o Continue reading >>

Three New Treatment Options For Type 2 Diabetes Recommended By Nice

Three New Treatment Options For Type 2 Diabetes Recommended By Nice

The drugs will help to control blood sugar in those patients who cannot take more commonly prescribed medicines meaning their condition remains stable for longer. An estimated 31,000 people may be eligible for the three recommended treatments: canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Forxiga) and empagliflozin (Jardiance). The three drugs can all be used on their own if a person can’t use metformin, sulfonylurea or pioglitazone, and diet and exercise alone isn’t controlling their blood glucose levels. In the UK, almost 3.5 million people who have been diagnosed with diabetes and it’s estimated that about 90% of adults with the condition have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes causes elevated blood sugar levels which damages blood vessels leading to increased risk of heart attack, stroke and limb amputation. Sugar levels rise because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin – the hormone which controls the amount of glucose in blood – or their body doesn’t use insulin effectively. Professor Carole Longson, director of the NICE Centre for Health Technology Evaluation, said: “Type 2 diabetes is long-term condition that has a serious impact on people who live with it, and the treatments given should be tailored for the individual. “For many people whose blood glucose levels aren’t controlled by diet and exercise alone, metformin is the first drug treatment that they’ll be offered. But some people may experience nausea and diarrhoea, and they may not be able to take it if they have kidney damage. For people who can’t take a sulfonylurea or pioglitazone, then the three drugs recommended in this guidance can be considered. This is as an alternative to the separate group of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. “The committee agreed th Continue reading >>

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better For Type 2 Diabetes?

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better For Type 2 Diabetes?

After Metformin, Are Newer Drugs Better for Type 2 Diabetes? Use of a sulfonylurea as second-line therapy after metformin for type 2 diabetes is just as effective as a newer agent but far less costly, a new study based on claims data finds. The results were published online February 26 in Diabetes Care by Yuanhui Zhang, a PhD candidate at North Carolina State University, Raleigh, and colleagues. "In light of an incomplete understanding of the pros and cons of second-line medications and the high cost associated with newer medications, the decision to use newer medications should be weighed against the additional cost burden to patients and/or the health system," study coauthor Brian Denton, PhD, of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, told Medscape Medical News. However, the use of retrospective data means that the study is subject to both ascertainment and physician-choice bias, said Alan J. Garber, MD, PhD, of Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, when asked to comment for Medscape Medical News. Moreover, noted Dr. Garber, the study doesn't adequately account for the adverse effects of sulfonylurea-induced hypoglycemia. "Patients value things differently. If you had a hypoglycemic episode and you don't like that, you're willing to pay a lot more of your discretionary income to avoid having another one." The researchers explain that there are currently 11 classes of approved glucose-lowering medications. Metformin has a long-standing evidence base for efficacy and safety, is inexpensive, and is regarded by most as the primary first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. When metformin fails to achieve or maintain glycemic goals, another agent needs to be added. However, there is no consensus or sufficient evidence supporting the use of one second-line agent over Continue reading >>

Older Is Better: Top Ten Comparison Of Diabetes Drugs Give Metformin Top Grade

Older Is Better: Top Ten Comparison Of Diabetes Drugs Give Metformin Top Grade

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Older Is Better: Top Ten Comparison Of Diabetes Drugs Give Metformin Top Grade Type 2 diabetes drug taken orally and in widespread use for more than a decade has been found to have distinct advantages over nine other, mostly newer medications used to control the chronic disease, according to a new study. A type 2 diabetes drug taken orally and in widespread use for more than a decade has been found to have distinct advantages over nine other, mostly newer medications used to control the chronic disease, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins. In their report, published online July 16 in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, the Hopkins team found that metformin, first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1995 (and sold as Glucophage, Riomet and Fortamet), not only controlled blood sugar levels but also was less likely to cause weight gain and more likely than others to lower bad cholesterol levels in the blood. Researchers say these health benefits are important because they can potentially ward off heart disease and other life-threatening consequence from diabetes. More than 15 million Americans have type 2 diabetes. "Sometimes newer is not necessarily better," says lead study author Shari Bolen, M.D., an internist at Hopkins. "Issues like blood sugar levels, weight gain and cost could be significant factors to many patients struggling to stay in good health," says Bolen, an instructor at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. In what is believed to be the largest drug comparison of its kind, the scientists showed that all of the commonly used oral medications worked much the same at lowering and controlling blood sugar levels, and were equally safe Continue reading >>

9 Blood Sugar Strategies I Like Better Than Metformin

9 Blood Sugar Strategies I Like Better Than Metformin

Easy Health Options Home Health Conditions Diabetes 9 blood sugar strategies I like better than metformin 9 blood sugar strategies I like better than metformin I took metformin for a week and felt like Id been pummeled with a sledgehammer. I dont have diabetes, so why did I try it? Well, as I explained in part one of this post , I have a genetic predisposition for both prostate cancer and type 2 diabetes, and Im getting older. The research I did indicated that metformin could truly be a wonder drug that could impact my disease risk and signs of aging. So I gave it a go. However, I quickly changed my mind. For starters the nasty side effects including weight gain, nausea and fatigue, just to name a few were quite unpleasant. But I also began to wonder Although metformin may be an effective way to reduce blood sugar, does it do a better job than lifestyle interventions? A study by The Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group showed that lifestyle changes resulted in a 58 percent reduction in the development of type 2 diabetes, while use of metformin alone only reduced diabetes incidence by a mere 31 percent. No nasty side effects come along with lifestyle changes. Was I disappointed that metformin wasnt the easy answer I thought it might be to prostate cancer prevention, improving insulin sensitivity and anti-aging? A little, but Ive always been way into exercise and nutrition. So, Im just doubling down on those key factors despite my genetics working against me. Im also adopting a bunch of other strategies to help keep my blood sugar under control going forward. Here are some suggestions you may also want to try: Reduce your alcohol intake. Reducing alcohol helps the liver better metabolize sugars and keep blood glucose at a healthier level. Basically, loading up the Continue reading >>

Compare Januvia Vs. Metformin

Compare Januvia Vs. Metformin

Oral blood sugar-lowering medicine. Januvia (sitagliptin) is not linked to worsening heart failure like other medicines in its class. It is less likely to cause weight gain and low blood sugar compared to other diabetes medicines. One of the few diabetes medicines that lowers the risk of death from diabetes-related complications. Rarely causes low blood sugar. 143 reviews so far Have you used Januvia (sitagliptin)? Leave a review 938 reviews so far Have you used Glucophage (metformin)? Leave a review Continue reading >>

Can This Herb Completely Replace Drugs For Type-2 Diabetics?

Can This Herb Completely Replace Drugs For Type-2 Diabetics?

A few weeks ago, I received this email from a diabetic patient of mine. He's been working hard to control his blood sugar. He said, "Hi Frank, I have some very good news that I'm excited to tell you. I've been following your program closely and was a little discouraged. Although my A1c levels [average blood sugar levels] have been dropping, my fasting blood sugar has not. It was still at 123. About two to three weeks ago, I began taking berberine (500 mg, three times daily) and my fasting blood sugar dropped into the 90s. I'm stoked! Sincerely, Rich." So the question I had to answer for myself is, "Why did Rich fail to respond well to my usual program, and then do so well on berberine?" Berberine is a phytochemical (plant chemical) found in many different plants. When used in herbal medicine, the usual sources are barberry, goldenseal, or Oregon grape. It's the main alkaloid of Coptis chinensis, which Asian folk medicine uses to treat diabetes. You also may hear people refer to Coptis chinensis as Chinese Goldthread, Huang-Lian, and Huang-LienIt. Berberine has a lot of uses. It can treat heart disease, immune disorders, digestive problems, eye infections, and other infections. I had never heard of it being all that effective in diabetes. So as soon as Rich sent me that message, I looked into it. I found several well-written scientific articles describing an effect of berberine that I could hardly believe. It seems that you can use it as a substitute for insulin. One study, published just last year looked at the effect of berberine on how well muscle cells take in sugar. As you probably already know, except when we are actively exercising, sugar cannot get into muscle cells unless insulin is present to escort it in. That's why the blood sugar goes up when patients either Continue reading >>

Elcelyx's Study Shows Newmet Has Better Glucose-lowering Effects Than Metformin In Type2 Diabetic Patients

Elcelyx's Study Shows Newmet Has Better Glucose-lowering Effects Than Metformin In Type2 Diabetic Patients

Elcelyx's study shows NewMet has better glucose-lowering effects than metformin in type2 diabetic patients Elcelyx Therapeutics announced today that clinical study results confirm that the primary site of action of Type 2 diabetes medicine metformin is in the lower bowel rather than in the circulation. The study revealed that contrary to popular belief, greater exposure in the plasma of metformin does not improve efficacy of the most prescribed diabetes medicine in the world. Elcelyx's Phase 2a study demonstrated this by comparing the glucose-lowering effects of NewMet, the company's proprietary delayed-release formulation of metformin, to generic metformin in patients with Type 2 diabetes . NewMet is formulated to target the entire dose to the lower bowel and limit absorption into the blood. In the crossover study, 5-day treatment with NewMet had similar fasting and post-meal glucose reductions from baseline as 5-day treatment with generic metformin despite greater than 45% reductions in metformin plasma concentrations. In addition, NewMet had less gastrointestinal (GI) side effects than generic metformin. Results of the clinical trial will be presented at ADA on Sunday by Dr. Ralph DeFronzo, Professor of Medicine and Chief of the Diabetes Division at the University of Texas Health Science Center and the Audie L. Murphy Memorial Veterans Administration Hospital in San Antonio, Texas. The significantly lower metformin plasma concentration observed with NewMet suggests that it might be safely used by patients with moderate and severe renal impairment, a population of patients that is unable to use currently available metformin formulations due to the risk of lactic acidosis caused by too much metformin in the blood. Mark Fineman, Ph.D., Senior Vice President of Research Continue reading >>

Alternate Medications Other Than Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes

Alternate Medications Other Than Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes

As of 2006 diabetes was the seventh cause of death in the United States, according to the American Diabetes Society. By 2007 the medical costs of diagnosed diabetes exceeded $100 billion. Medication is a major factor in treating diabetes. Metformin is often the drug prescribed to newly diagnosed diabetics, notes FamilyDoctor.org. However there are other medications that be used in addition to metformin. Video of the Day Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors are a form of oral diabetes medication that target the digestive system. These drugs decrease the absorption of blood sugar by the stomach and intestines, explains FamilyDoctor.org. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors may cause abdominal pain, loose bowel movement, or bloatedness. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 Inhibitors Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, or DPP-4 inhibitors, are oral medicines that aid the body in producing insulin after meals. DPP-4 inhibitors accomplish this by preventing the destruction of a biochemical called GLP-1. This biochemical helps reduce blood sugar levels, according to the American Diabetes Association. Exenatide is an incretin mimetic. Incretin mimetics are injectable diabetic medications that typically lower blood sugar by stimulating insulin release. Incretin mimetics can cause nausea and possibly hypoglycemia, explains the American Diabetes Association. Insulin is a biochemical that is normally produced by the pancreas, and utilized to regulate blood sugar levels, according to the American Diabetes Association. However diabetes either prevents the body from producing insulin, or renders the body unable to utilize the insulin produced. As such, it is necessary for some diabetics to use artificial insulin. However because insulin breaks down upon contact with digestive juices insulin must injected directly Continue reading >>

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