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Best Way To Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

Diet Strategies For Women With Diabetes: Why Some Work And Why Some Don't

Diet Strategies For Women With Diabetes: Why Some Work And Why Some Don't

If you're a woman with diabetes, have you ever cut back on your insulin — perhaps just a little — because you've discovered that you can lose a few pounds in a few days by doing so? And then, when you go back to using your normal amount of insulin, are you dismayed to discover that you gain the weight back — and perhaps more — in equally rapid fashion? Over time, have you come to blame the insulin for your weight gain problems, so you take less insulin than you should — even though you're blood glucose runs higher as a result? Over 40 women with diabetes, many of whom admitted to having let this familiar thought process influence their diabetes program, came together at Joslin's second Women and Diabetes symposium recently. The day-long symposium attracted nearly 100 women with diabetes who heard talks on topics ranging from the interrelationship of diabetes, menopause, and heart disease, to a session on having a healthy pregnancy if you have diabetes. One of the most popular sessions, however, was entitled "Living on the Edge." Presented by Joslin dietitian Karen Chalmers, M.S., R.D., C.D.E., who is the Director of Nutrition Services at Joslin, the session examined the balancing act women with diabetes encounter as they try to keep blood glucose in a safe range — and their weight down too. "Most of the women at the session on insulin and weight gain were between 20 and 55 years old or so," notes Chalmers in an interview after the symposium. "Some were on intensive insulin therapy, but others were doing insulin manipulation to lose weight. This is a fairly common kind of problem in women with diabetes. Weight loss is a big challenge — nearly an obsession — with many women in this day and age. Our society is so hung up on being thin, and these women begin Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

Low Carb And Weight Loss In Type 1 Diabetes

Low Carb And Weight Loss In Type 1 Diabetes

Tweet In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t automatically respond to meals by releasing insulin, this has to be done manually through taking injections or through bolus doses via insulin pump. If you’re looking to lose weight, this can give an advantage, in a way, as it allows you to review exactly how much insulin you’re taking each day. By contrast, people without type 1 diabetes have no good way of knowing how much insulin they have in their body. A good rule of thumb is that the more units of insulin you take per day, the more likely you are to put on weight. See also more general advice in our guide to weight loss on a low-carb diet Less insulin intake, improved weight management Say Jill and Michelle are roughly the same height and both have type 1 diabetes. Jill is taking 50 units per day and Michelle is taking 100 units per day. Generally speaking, it’s more likely that Jill will be finding it easier to manage her weight than Michelle. So, if you’re looking to lose weight, one way to achieve this is to modify your diet, or eating habits, so that you take less insulin whilst maintaining good blood control. Warning note: We need to make an important safety note that reducing your insulin whilst letting glucose levels go high for long periods of time is not a good idea at all. Doing this will lead to a much greater risk of very serious health problems such as retinopathy, neuropathy and kidney disease. Reducing insulin intake safely There are a number of ways insulin intake can be reduced in a safe way: Lower your carbohydrate intake Lower your protein intake -if you eat a lot of protein Increase physical activity Reduce snacking Out of these, reducing carbohydrate intake is likely to have the greatest effect. Lowering insulin doses should only be done if Continue reading >>

'diabulimia': Type 1 Diabetics Restricting Insulin To Lose Weight Need To Be Taken Seriously, Experts Say

'diabulimia': Type 1 Diabetics Restricting Insulin To Lose Weight Need To Be Taken Seriously, Experts Say

Australian health professionals are calling for greater awareness about the prevalence and danger of Type 1 diabetics restricting their insulin to lose weight, in what is being called "diabulimia". The practice means diabetics can lose large amounts of weight rapidly, but the emotional and physical effects can be devastating and in some cases deadly. Georgie Peters was 18 when she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and, after struggling with eating disorders in the past, found adjusting to the condition difficult. "My weight sort of got out of control because I was still trying to figure out how to manage it, because diabetes in itself is quite difficult to manage," Ms Peters said. Not long after her diagnosis while she was overseas, Ms Peters discovered there was an easy and quick way to lose the weight she had gained. Ms Peters began to restrict the amount of insulin she took, meaning her body could no longer absorb the glucose in her blood and instead began to burn fat as substitute to provide her energy. "Then that sort of snowballed with my mental health so it went from me not taking as much insulin as I should've just to make sure my weight wasn't too high, to me not taking my insulin at all or just maybe having a couple of units a day" Ms Peters said. As well having as an impact on her mood, other areas of Ms Peters' mental health suffered from her condition and she developed retinopathy and has lasting vision complications. She said when it came to treatment there needed to be a greater understanding from health professionals about the extent to which diabetes and eating disorders overlapped. "It is really important that healthcare professionals on the eating disorder side and the diabetes side realise that it's really interlinked and it really requires a cohesi Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes

6 Tips For Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes

The benefits of a healthy weight Thinking of dropping a few pounds? If you’re overweight and have diabetes, it’s one of the best things you can do for your overall health. A study at the Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Health Research in Oregon found that people who shed weight within about 18 months of being diagnosed with type-2 diabetes were more likely to keep long-term control over their blood pressure and glucose levels. When you have diabetes, a healthy weight reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease and actually helps your body’s own insulin to work better. “In addition, people who lose weight generally feel better. It’s value added!” says Dr. Ian Blumer, a diabetes specialist in Ajax, Ontario, and author of Diabetes for Canadians for Dummies. Want work towards a healthy number on the scale? These six tips will help you reach your goal. 1. Talk to your healthcare team Let your dietitian, nurse educator and/or doctor know that you’re taking on the task of losing weight. “Find out if there should be some change in your therapy,” says Blumer. Your healthcare professional can also help you set reasonable goals. Fad diets are definitely not recommended. But if you do plan to make drastic changes to your daily menu, it’s critically important you have medical guidance, Blumer says. “Before adopting a low-carb diet, a doctor should be consulted as certain medications-such as insulin-may need to be adjusted in order to avoid low blood glucose.” 2. Count your calories Losing weight means cutting calories, but it doesn’t have to mean eliminating everything you love to eat. Just eat smaller portions, and focus on low-fat foods. Try keeping a record of what you’re eating and how many calories you’re consuming. That way you’ll be able to id Continue reading >>

3 Simple Tricks To Not Let Type 1 Diabetes Ruin Your Diet & Weight Loss Goals

3 Simple Tricks To Not Let Type 1 Diabetes Ruin Your Diet & Weight Loss Goals

“Type 1 diabetes stops me from losing weight” is the number one excuse I hear when people say they are struggling to lose weight (seriously, my Instagram inbox is flooded with this statement/question). And while insulin can be a tricky hormone to work around when losing weight with type 1 diabetes, I’ve found that 99% of the time it is because their general dieting techniques are off. Before reading my three nutrition tricks for losing weight with type 1 diabetes, make sure you are doing the following: Weighing and tracking your food intake (My Fitness Pal) Eating toward a specifically calculated calorie/macronutrient (IIFYM.com) Combining aerobic & anaerobic training If you aren’t following the above, it is most likely not your diabetes that is stoping you from losing weight– it is the lack of clarity and preparation for your goals. Once you solidify your general nutrition foundation, now you can go to the next specific tactics related to diabetes management that will help you stay on track. Carb Reserve There is nothing worse than being on track to hit your calories and macros perfectly then being engulfed by an endless food-frenzy brought on by a bad low. Hypoglycemia is a major reason why people go over their carb & calorie limits for the day as you need carbs to fix the low. But there is a way to work around this issue: Implementing a carb reserve. A carb reserve is when you reserve 15-30 grams of your total daily carbs for a low blood sugar attack. For example, if your weight loss goal calls for 100 grams of carbs a day, act like you only have 85 grams of carbs for the day and keep 15 grams of carbs just in case of a low. That way, when you treat your low blood sugar, you aren’t ruining your daily goals. Proper preparation prevents poor performance! An Continue reading >>

Diabulimia: Skipping Insulin To Lose Weight

Diabulimia: Skipping Insulin To Lose Weight

A dangerous eating disorder is affecting thousands of teenage girls and women with type 1 diabetes. Sometimes called “diabulimia,” the common practice of skipping or reducing insulin to lose weight is putting lives at risk. “We think more than 10 percent of young women with type 1 diabetes are regularly omitting insulin to control their weight,” says William Polonsky, PhD, a diabetes educator and chief executive officer of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute in San Diego. But since it’s a secretive disorder, the percentage is probably much higher, he says. A recent report in the World Journal of Diabetes estimates that between 30 to 40 percent of teens and young adults with type 1 diabetes skip insulin after meals in order to lose weight. What Is Diabulimia? You won’t find diabulimia in medical books because it’s not a recognized condition. It’s a term now used in the media to describe the eating disorder bulimia among type 1 diabetics. Bulimia is a disorder in which a person eats and then purges, usually by vomiting or abusing laxatives. In diabulimia, the tool used to purge calories is simply to cut back on insulin. “It’s extraordinarily successful and quite addictive,” says Polonsky. “But it can harm you terribly in the near-to-long term. It is so scary and hard to treat.” Diabetes: The Insulin and Weight Loss Connection People with type 1 diabetes need daily insulin doses to live. In this type of diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t produce insulin, the hormone the body needs to absorb glucose (sugar) and use it as energy or store it as fat. If insulin is used appropriately, the glucose is absorbed from the blood into the body’s tissues and used (or stored). Without insulin, the glucose builds up in the blood and is excreted in the urine. This Continue reading >>

What Is A Good, Fast, And Effective Way For Type 1 Diabetics To Lose Weight?

What Is A Good, Fast, And Effective Way For Type 1 Diabetics To Lose Weight?

A diabetic type I or II can and will benefit in so many ways the same way that any non-diabetic can. By eating a whole foods diet. What does that mean? It's really simple actually. You eat things that you would find growing in the ground or on trees, and you completely avoid foods that come in a box and have multi-million dollar marketing attached to them. I don't have to tell you that as a diabetic you don't want to be eating foods that are high in sugar. So this obviously means sweets like cake and candy, but is all other food safe? Shockingly, no, it is not. If you are eating processed foods you are eating sugar, and you are very likely eating a lot of it. Not only is this terrible for diabetes, but it is going to cause weight gain. It's not calories...it never was. People will argue with this, because every single day they do, but there is a really simple way you can test this out. Avoid sugar. Read every single label on every single food you buy. Look for sugar, or any of the 50+ names for sugar. If you see it listed, do not eat that food. Look at the "Sugars" portion of the label too. If it has any, you don't want it. Of course avoiding sugar 100% can be difficult, but it can be done. Also, you don't have to avoid it 100% if you try to really limit it. As a guideline, the World Health Organization has recommended that people consume no more than 25 grams of sugar per day. That is equal to about 6 teaspoons. So if you are about to eat a food that maybe is labeled "low fat" or "low calorie" look at the sugar. It may have 12 grams or less or double that...you just never know. A Yoplait yogurt has 12 grams of sugar per container. That's 3 teaspoons in one tiny little container of pure sugar. That's not great for your weight, your health or most definitely diabetes. So Continue reading >>

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

The 2-day Diabetes Diet: What To Eat To Lose Weight

For folks with diabetes, weight loss is a natural form of “medication.” Reams of research prove that losing even just a few pounds is an effective way to control blood sugar or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. But in an ironic twist, losing weight may be more difficult if you have type 2 diabetes. And the reason isn’t just a lack of willpower. Too often, diet plans don’t work for people with diabetes because the metabolism changes associated with blood sugar problems may increase appetite, slow down fat burning, and encourage fat storage. Now breakthrough research has revealed a better way for people to lose weight and reduce insulin resistance. The secret is a concept called intermittent fasting. British researchers created this revolutionary new diet, which strictly limits caloric intake for two days of the week but permits larger portions for the remainder. Women who followed the plan lost almost twice as much fat as those who restricted calories every day. Within three months, participants reduced insulin resistance by 25 percent more on nonfast days and inflammation by 8 percent more than people who dieted continuously. Why Does this Particular Diabetes Diet Plan Work? It counteracts the effects of “diabesity,” where blood sugar problems and excess body fat meet. Just a small amount of excess weight and a genetic tendency for metabolism problems can trigger a cascade of health issues, including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, immune system problems, and hormonal imbalances. This constellation of health problems is caused by a modern lifestyle that is out of sync with our genetic inheritance. Researchers theorize that because humans evolved during alternating periods of feast and famine, many of us inherited variou Continue reading >>

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

How To Reverse A Diabetes Diagnosis By Losing Weight

Here's something shocking to think about: 40 percent of Americans are obese — and that number is the highest it's ever been. And here's another jaw-dropping statistic: 29 million Americans have type 2 diabetes. If you fall into either of these categories, the good news is there are simple steps you can take to make lasting changes. For example, you only need to lose 5 percent of your body weight to seriously start reducing your risk for type 2 diabetes. And you only need to lose 1 gram of fat from your pancreas (where your insulin lives) to reverse the symptoms of diabetes, according to one small study. The connection between a small amount of weight loss with a large health benefit is not new. A 2012 study found reducing body mass index (BMI) by just five units could help reverse diabetes, regardless of your initial BMI. Diabetes can be a confusing topic — here are a few things you should know. There are two very different types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes involves the absence of insulin, a critical hormone needed to help control blood sugar levels. It has often been referred to as juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes represents a very small percentage of total diabetes cases and has nothing to do with being overweight or obese. The other form is called type 2 diabetes (often referred to as adult onset or noninsulin dependent). Type 2 diabetes makes up 95 percent of all diabetes cases and it’s highly correlated to weight. Individuals with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but the hormone is not sensitive enough to the rise and fall of blood sugar levels. This form of the disease may start as insulin resistance or prediabetes. Both types of diabetes are serious and can lead to several adverse health outcomes, like nerve damage, impaired Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

The Best Diabetes-friendly Diets To Help You Lose Weight

Maintaining a healthy weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, excess weight may make it harder to control your blood sugar levels and may increase your risk for some complications. Losing weight can be extra challenging for people with diabetes. Eating healthfully while you try to reduce weight is important for everyone, but if you have diabetes, choosing the wrong diet could harm your health. Weight loss pills and starvation diets should be avoided, but there are many popular diets that may be beneficial. Diabetes and diet: What’s the connection? If you have diabetes, you should focus on eating lean protein, high-fiber, less processed carbs, fruits, and vegetables, low-fat dairy, and healthy vegetable-based fats such as avocado, nuts, canola oil, or olive oil. You should also manage your carbohydrate intake. Have your doctor or dietitian provide you with a target carb number for meals and snacks. Generally, women should aim for about 45 grams of carb per meal while men should aim for 60. Ideally, these would come from complex carbs, fruits, and vegetables. The American Diabetes Association offers a comprehensive list of the best foods for those with diabetes. Their recommendations include: Protein Fruits and vegetables Dairy Grains beans berries low- or nonfat milk whole grains, such as brown rice and whole-wheat pasta nuts sweet potatoes low- or nonfat yogurt poultry nonstarchy vegetables such as asparagus, broccoli, collard greens, kale, and okra eggs oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines Staying hydrated is also important when it comes to overall health. Choose noncaloric options such as water and tea whenever possible. For people with diabetes, there are certain foods that should be limited. These foods can cause spikes in the Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Lchf – A Great Combination

Type 1 Diabetes And Lchf – A Great Combination

Is an LCHF diet really a great option for type 1 diabetes? What do people with a lot of experience say? We were just on the most spectacular trip of the year, the low-carb cruise in the Caribbean. We invited our participating moderators to write guest posts here on the blog. Here’s travel report number three, with important information on type 1 diabetes from our moderator Fredrik Söderlund: Guest post by Fredrik Söderlund Type 1 diabetes and LCHF – a great combination On the cruise I was inspired by both presenters and guests to write a few paragraphs about LCHF and type 1 diabetes. There’s still a fairly common misconception that type 1 diabetics won’t benefit from LCHF or that it may even be dangerous. One of the presenters was nephrologist Dr. Keith Runyan who himself has lived with type 1 diabetes for 17 years and switched to LCHF three years ago. Today he eats a ketogenic LCHF diet, or LCHFKD. Among the conference participants were several type 1 diabetics who advocate LCHF; one of them was Hanna Boëthius. She has had the disease for 30 years, since she was 2 years old, and switched to LCHF four years ago. Hanna was convinced of the benefits of the diet when she studied to become a nutrition counselor and now has her own business to help other diabetics worldwide (www.hannaboethius.com.) Hanna eats a ketogenic LCHF diet with 20–30 g carbohydrates daily and, like Dr. Runyan, she points out the many benefits of the diet that are beneficial for type 1 diabetics. I’m compiling some of the benefits that they both put forward on the cruise, but first some background knowledge. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that we don’t know how to prevent. The pancreas produces no, or very little, insulin. Insulin is needed to transport gluco Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

How To Lose Weight When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

Also known as juvenile diabetes, type 1 diabetes is usually detected in children, adolescents and teenagers. Type 1 diabetes means that the body is failing to produce insulin. This type of diabetes generally makes a person, insulin dependent for life. Adults and children, who are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, tend to suffer from initial weight loss and then weight gain. In order to lose weight with type 1 diabetes, one needs to exercise control over the glucose levels in the body and also control other weight affecting factors such as secretion form the thyroid glands and cholesterol levels in the body. Losing weight with type 1 diabetes People who are burdened with increasing weight after being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can look into the following suggestions: It is important to keep a check on one’s weight if someone has type 1 diabetes. Even minor weight gain needs to be checked. Effective ways to lose weight with type 1 diabetes are healthy eating and appropriate physical activity. Type 1 diabetes requires a person to eat more food. However, a good way to lose weight is to reduce calorie intake slowly, once the blood sugar level is being effectively controlled with insulin therapy. Daily exercise is the best way to lose weight with type 1 diabetes If you have gained a lot of weight because of your insulin therapy, you can lose the extra flab with routine workouts. Cardio and resistance training are the ways to attack the flab in the body. However, make sure to eat a small snack before you exercise and keep a check on your blood sugar level. Measure it before and after exercising. A protein shake after a workout will help you regain lost energy. Also keep a supply of food handy while exercising. Do not take insulin shot right before exercising, as insulin de Continue reading >>

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

Losing Weight With Diabetes: What Prevents It And Causes Weight Gain

I recently was included in a discussion on a Facebook group for athletes with diabetes about how hard it can be to lose weight through exercise. While I would never claim to have all the answers on this topic, here are some ideas about what can make you gain weight or keep you from losing weight with diabetes, based on my decades of professional and personal experience with diabetes and weight management, and what you can do about it. Insulin My former graduate student with type 1 diabetes went on an insulin pump and promptly gained about 10 pounds, even though his blood glucose control improved only marginally. Why did this happen to him (and why does it happen to so many other insulin users)? As a naturally occurring anabolic hormone, insulin promotes the uptake and storage of glucose, amino acids, and fat into insulin-sensitive cells around your body (mainly muscle and fat cells). It doesn’t matter whether it’s released naturally, injected, or pumped—all insulin and insulin analogues have these same effects. Going on intensive insulin therapy is associated with fat weight gain (1), for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Some of the weight gain comes from that if you’re using insulin to keep your blood glucose in control, you’ll be keeping and storing all of the calories that you’re eating instead of losing some glucose through urine (during hyperglycemia). Unfortunately, this realization has led some people to try skipping or limiting their insulin use to help them lose weight (2), but that is a dangerous practice that can lead to loss of excess muscle mass and life-threatening conditions like DKA. The best way to balance your insulin use and your body weight, in my opinion, is to be physically active to keep your overall insulin levels lower. I Continue reading >>

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

At age 14, Erin Williams was tired of medicine. Williams was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic at age 11, and after three years of enduring a never-ending regimen of insulin shots and strict diet restrictions, she was frustrated. Embarrassed by her disease, she kept it a secret from everyone but her closest family and friends. At birthday parties, she made up excuses about why she couldn't have soda or cake. When a classmate saw her drinking juice boxes in the nurses office, she endured weeks of being called the "juice box thief" rather than just tell her classmates she had low blood sugar because of diabetes. Eventually, Williams rebelled the only way she could, she decided not take her insulin. She just didn't want to adhere to the strict diet and medical regimen even though it was vital to her health. "It wasn't this dramatic moment," recalled Williams. "It was mostly like I want to be like everybody else." The next morning when Williams woke up, she felt fine. "Well, nothing bad happened to me," Williams remembered thinking. "It creeps up on you. That's how it does it." Emboldened by her experiment, she continued to restrict her insulin. Without a regimented amount of insulin in her body to process glucose, Williams' body started to burn through fat and muscle. She lost weight very quickly even as she ate all the same foods. Classmates started commenting on her weight loss and remarked that she looked great. "You hear all these things and you're like, 'This is the greatest thing in the world,'" said Williams. "It takes a hold of your life like nothing else." After living with type 1 diabetes for three years, Williams was exhibiting the first signs of a disorder often called diabulimia. The term refers to the dual diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and an eating disorder. Man Continue reading >>

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