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Best Pediatric Insulin Pump

Diabetes: Living With An Insulin Pump

Diabetes: Living With An Insulin Pump

Introduction More and more people with diabetes are using insulin pumps instead of daily shots to manage their disease. The pumps give them more freedom to eat, sleep, and exercise when they want. A pump can be an important tool in preventing problems like very low blood sugar. But using an insulin pump takes some getting used to. The more you learn about your pump and how to live with it, the happier you will be. How to live with an insulin pump Choosing a pump Some people say choosing which pump to use is actually harder than deciding to switch to a pump in the first place. There are a number of insulin pump companies, and each pump is slightly different. Ask members of your diabetes team which pumps they recommend. If you have insurance, find out which pump brands are covered. Then ask those companies to send you information. Insulin pump companies also have websites where you can get all kinds of information. Your diabetes educator likely will have a variety of pumps that you can look at. Because improvements in insulin pumps are happening so fast, your local hospital may have open houses a few times a year so that pump makers can show their products and tell you how they work. Ask the company to send a sales representative to your home. That way you can see each pump you are considering, see how easy it is to program the pump, and learn how to give yourself a bolus (extra insulin). You should be able to try out the pump with saline solution. That way you can really see how it works and feels. Your infusion site The infusion site is the area on your body where you have attached your infusion set. Infusion sites can get infected, so it's important to know how to place the catheter correctly and to keep the area clean. Replace your infusion set every 2 or 3 days or as Continue reading >>

Pediatric Pump Program At Joslin Diabetes Center

Pediatric Pump Program At Joslin Diabetes Center

Insulin pumps are an important tool for managing diabetes. Our program gives your child a great start at using it. Today more and more young people, including young children, are successfully using insulin pumps. But, its important for patients to learn how to use them correctly and adapt well to insulin treatment. Joslin Diabetes Center offers an Insulin Pump Program to give children with type 1 and type 2 diabetes the best chance at a successful treatment with insulin therapy. Today insulin pump therapy is the closest match to the way a body normally delivers insulin. Thats why its such a common treatment solution for our patients. Using an insulin pump requires more work, but it results in great control over diabetes and more freedom. Pumps, about the size of a pager, are worn next to the body. They deliver a continuous stream of insulin throughout the day and night via a thin tube inserted into the body. Using the pump requires checking blood glucose (sugar) more often, but it also means that a patient doesnt have to do self injections throughout the day. Joslin offers a specialized program for children who are prescribed insulin therapy. This program helps ensure patients enjoy the best possible outcomes while learning how to use an insulin pump. Together, a physician, nurse educator, registered dietitian, child development specialist, will offer information about: Challenges and opportunities the pump offers The patients and familys readiness for the pump The appropriate timing for starting the pump After an initial pump evaluation, our team takes patients and their family members through an individualized, gradual introduction to using the pump. The first pump appointment starts an adjustment period, during which patients get used to wearing the pump with saline Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Animas Vibe Insulin Pump And Continuous Glucose Monitoring System For Use In Children

Fda Approves Animas Vibe Insulin Pump And Continuous Glucose Monitoring System For Use In Children

FDA Approves Animas Vibe Insulin Pump and Continuous Glucose Monitoring System For Use in Children Insulin Pump System Offers Children Ages Two and Older an Integrated Solution for Diabetes Management CHESTERBROOK, Pa., Jan. 11, 2016 /PRNewswire/ --Animas Corporation announced that FDA has approved the use of the Animas Vibe Insulin Pump and Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System for the management of diabetes in children and adolescents, ages two to 17. The Animas Vibe System was the first integrated system featuring Dexcom G4 PLATINUM CGM technology, and is the only such system available in the U.S. for pediatric patients as young as age two. The Animas Vibe System allows patients and their caregivers to view glucose data and administer insulin right from the pump, making it easy to fine-tune insulin delivery to help manage their diabetes. "CGM-enabled systems, like the Animas Vibe System, provide patients with a more complete glucose picture, which is acutely important for children since they might not always be aware of the symptoms associated with high or low blood sugars," said Dr. Brian Levy, Chief Medical Officer, Animas. "The approval of the pediatric indication for Animas Vibe System enables parents and caregivers to both deliver insulin precisely, and monitor glucose trends accurately in children as young as age two with one integrated device." The value of insulin pump therapy has been demonstrated in numerous clinical studies, showing significant improvement in blood glucose control when compared to multiple daily injections. Furthermore, studies have shown that patients who used insulin pump therapy in combination with CGM obtained lower HbA1c levels, relative to patients who used multiple daily injections and self-monitoring of blood glucose.1, 2 Thi Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Vs. Insulin Injection: Which Is Best For Type 1 Children?

Insulin Pump Vs. Insulin Injection: Which Is Best For Type 1 Children?

Insulin pumps therapy is associated with better glycemic control and fewer complications, new study suggests. Insulin delivery via injection and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion via insulin pump were compared in a recent observational study to determine whether the rates of severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis are lower with insulin pump therapy compared with insulin injection therapy in young adults with type 1 diabetes. The study population included 30,579 patients younger than 20 years with type 1 diabetes duration of more than one year and who have been treated with either insulin pump therapy or with multiple daily (≥4) insulin injections for at least one year. Researchers examined data of 30,579 participants with mean age of 14.1 years, in which 14,119 patients used insulin pump therapy (median duration, 3.7 years) and the other 16,460 patients used insulin injections (median duration, 3.6 years). Patients using pump therapy (n = 9814) were matched with 9,814 patients using injection therapy. The study findings show that patients were less likely to develop severe low blood sugar (difference, −4.42 [95% CI, −6.15 to −2.69]; P < .001) or diabetic ketoacidosis (difference, −0.63 [95% CI, −1.24 to −0.02]; P = .04) when using an insulin pump instead of insulin injections. The glycated hemoglobin levels were also lower in young people who used insulin pump (8.04%) than in those who injected insulin (8.22%); (difference, −0.18 [95% CI, −0.22 to −0.13], P < .001). Total daily insulin doses were also lower with an insulin pump therapy (0.84 U/kg) than with injections therapy (0.98 U/kg); (difference, −0.14 [−0.15 to −0.13], P < .001). There was no significant difference in body mass index between pump therapy and injection therap Continue reading >>

The Best Insulin Pumps On The Market

The Best Insulin Pumps On The Market

An insulin pump is a small computerized device that delivers insulin for the treatment of diabetes. The pump is programmed to release insulin in continuous small basal dose and a bolus dose. A pump has a control module, a reservoir, an infusion set that includes a cannula and tubing system. There are a number of different types of insulin pumps available on the market. In general, there are two types of pump devices: A traditional pump uses a fine tube to connect the pump to the cannula. The pump is worn in the pocket. The program controls are on the pump. A patch pump has a small tube or no tube, and the pump is stuck to the skin. The controls are on a separate wireless device. The following are types of pumps more commonly used: Worn on your body, the pump delivers tiny drops of rapid-acting insulin to match your needs. Fewer injections: Change your pump tubing only once every two to three days. Bolus Wizard calculator makes it easier to calculate mealtime insulin and may avoid insulin stacking. Set temporary basal rates and patterns around your activities. Get readings every five minutes, right on your pump. Track your glucose levels throughout the day, including the effects of food or exercise. Helpful alerts: Get alerted when youre trending high or low, so you can make adjustments. The system has the features of 530 G system with a few differences. Polished black exterior finish; easily customizable with a wide variety of personalized skins. Highly accurate wireless CONTOURNEXT LINK 2.4 meter (a MiniMed system exclusive). Fewer shots: A small device worn on your body that continuously delivers insulin. Tubing changes needed only every two or three days. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Comparisons - Compare Insulin Pumps By Manufacturer

Insulin Pump Comparisons - Compare Insulin Pumps By Manufacturer

Insulin Pump Comparisons Integrated Diabetes Services 2018-07-12T16:48:14+00:00 Read the new 2018 insulin pump comparisons by Dr. Gary Scheiner and his staff. We give an unbiased review of the best insulin pumps on the market and provide the pros and cons of each one. Cartridges hold 300u (t:slim); 480u (t:flex) Can calculate boluses up to 50 units (60 on t:flex) Site-change reminder w/customizable day & time Can set duration of insulin action in 1-minute increments IOB & time remaining displayed on home screen Missed bolus reminders customizable by day of week Alert for high temperatures which may spoil insulin Secondary basal programs linked with secondary bolus calculation parameters Minimal insulin movement with changes in altitude Small buttons can be difficult to activate; screen goes blank if buttons missed 3x Unlock procedure required to perform any programming No integrated clip (must put in a case that has a clip) Tubing connector looks medical, can snag on clothing Basal & bolus settings in same time slots; may take several steps to edit Extra confirmation steps with all programming Manufacturer relatively new in pump industry Can program through clothing from a few feet away Discrete pump size (compared to other pumps) No tubing (minimizes wasted insulin, no tangling/snagging, less awkward, no air pockets, no siphoning effects) No disconnecting/reconnecting means no missed/lost insulin Simple, automated canula insertion minimizes pain, reduces human errors, creates more site options Forced pod change reduces chances for lipodystrophy & absorption problems Temp basals and boluses can be customized/preset Freestyle meter built into handheld programmer Can customize programming text without PC linkup Large color screen w/full-sentence text and graphing capabil Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Center

Insulin Pump Center

Our experience in treatment of diabetes with insulin pumps has led to the creation of a comprehensive Insulin Pump Center (IPC) where patients with diabetes who are on insulin pumps are managed. This is the first of its kind in the nation. The Insulin Pump Center provides services from basic teaching about pump therapy to advanced treatment and online monitoring of patients on insulin pumps. We offer educational sessions throughout the year in scheduled classes and individual appointments. Our goal is to achieve optimal control of blood sugar in order to avoidn complications resulting from high or low blood sugar levels. The Insulin Pump Center staff includes our medical director, who is a board certified clinical endocrinologist; a pediatric endocrinologist; nurse pracitioners; registered dietitians; counselors, and certified diabetes educators. All of our staff are certified insulin pump trainers that are well versed in insulin pump therapy. We have certified pump trainers for all recognized pumps and are distinguished as being a center of excellence for insulin pump therapy by the Medtronic Insulin Pump Corporation. We take pride in our insulin pump program for patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Our goal is to be available to meet our pump patient's needs during and between clinic appointments. Patiens are instruced on how to download their pump at home and forward the download to the clinic for review. Our staff of diabetes educators, dietitians, nurse practitioners and board certified endocrinologists are well versed with the intricacies of diabetes treatment and mangement using an insulin pump. The team is famililar with and comfortable in prescribing insulin pump therapy as well as monitoring and adjusting insulin pump settings to maintain the patient's di Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Insulin Pump Integrated With Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitor

Fda Approves First Insulin Pump Integrated With Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitor

Animas Corporation, part of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Care Companies (JJDCC), announced today that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, and Health Canada's authorization for the sale of the OneTouch Vibe™ Plus Insulin Pump and Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) System for the treatment of patients age two and older living with diabetes. The OneTouch Vibe Plus is the first and only insulin pump integrated with Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM technology, combining accurate and precise insulin dosing technology from Animas with the most accurate CGM sensing technology from Dexcom. This system will enable patients to see their glucose reading at all times either on their pump or on using the Dexcom G5 App on their smart phone, and to deliver the precise amounts of insulin they may need from the pump. The Dexcom G5 Transmitter collects blood glucose readings from the Dexcom sensor and wirelessly sends them to the patient's OneTouch Vibe Plus Insulin Pump screen and compatible smart device using the Dexcom G5 Mobile System and app. This will enable patients using the pump and their caregivers to access CGM data wherever it is most convenient for them, and to make informed diabetes management decisions. In addition to the primary smart device, glucose data can be shared with up to five people utilizing the Dexcom Follow App. "People living with diabetes will no longer have to pull out their pump to read their glucose readings. By having constant access to glucose readings on their pump and now their smart devices, the OneTouch Vibe Plus will give people with diabetes greater flexibility and discretion," said Brian L. Levy, MD, FACE, Chief Medical Officer of JJDCC and Vice President of Worldwide Clinical Affairs for LifeScan Inc. "This unique connectiv Continue reading >>

Giving Insulin To Your Child With Type 1 Diabetes

Giving Insulin To Your Child With Type 1 Diabetes

Injections and finger sticks are part of life for a child with type 1 diabetes. We've got suggestions to make the process easier. Uncomfortable little jabs are now part of your routine, if yours is one of the 15,000 American children diagnosed each year with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Our experts suggest simple ways to reduce the discomfort, and help your child adapt quickly to needles. How insulin works When a child has T1D, the immune system attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas called beta cells. Pancreatic beta cells produce insulin, the hormone we need to turn food into energy. Without enough insulin, the amount of sugar (or glucose) in the blood rises to dangerous levels. This can cause long-term complications such as kidney failure, heart disease, lower-limb amputations, and blindness in adulthood. That's why kids with T1D have blood glucose levels checked throughout the day and night to help keep the sugar levels within target range. Using a lancet, you'll likely prick your child's fingertip for a drop of blood six or more times a day, and place it on a special test strip in a blood glucose meter. Based on that reading, you'll know how much insulin your child needs to keep blood sugar levels in range. Shots and pumps: the basics You can give your child insulin in a few ways, depending on what works best for both of you. The oldest method is through multiple daily injections with a syringe or insulin pen, which is a disposable needle tip placed at the end of a marker-shaped device that contains a pre-filled insulin cartridge. An alternative to injections is an insulin pump, a beeper-sized computerized device often worn on a belt or in a pocket. It delivers an ongoing low dose of insulin through a small tube inserted into your child's body through a needle. The t Continue reading >>

New Insulin Pump Spells More Freedom For Diabetics

New Insulin Pump Spells More Freedom For Diabetics

Sitting on the bleachers at Peninsula High School, a lacrosse helmet and stick beside him, Scott Phillips glances at fingers scarred from nearly six years of daily blood sugar tests. Phillips was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 12 years old, and the day-to-day ordeal of managing Type 1 diabetes have been at the back of his mind ever since, he said. Now, he’s one of the first recipients of a new type of insulin pump that doctors say could be a huge step forward for diabetics managing disease. Peace of mind The pump, developed by medical technology company Medtronic, has been dubbed by some an “artificial pancreas” because of its ability to monitor a patient’s blood sugar and automatically adjust the amount of insulin it administers in response to an increase or decrease in glucose levels. The system doesn’t function exactly like a normal pancreas — users still have to monitor their blood sugar regularly and give additional insulin before meals. But for people with Type 1 diabetes, whose pancreases have stopped producing insulin that the body uses to process sugar from foods, it’s an improvement over other available options. “There’s not ever anything I thought, ‘Oh, I can’t do that because I have diabetes,’ ” Phillips said. “But (the system) definitely makes those things that I want to do that may be more challenging for someone who’s diabetic, it would probably make them a lot easier.” Phillips has never been one to let his diabetes slow him down, says his mother, Cheryl, but that doesn’t change the fact that it takes an enormous amount of thought to stay on top of a lengthy list of variables that can change blood sugar from one day to the next. “You can never just say, ‘Oh, I don’t want to deal with this,’ ever,” she said. Continue reading >>

The Use Of Insulin Pumps In Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

The Use Of Insulin Pumps In Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Insulin pump (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion [CSII]) therapy became more widely accepted for youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the mid-1990s after the availability of the rapid-acting insulin, insulin lispro. Previously, pediatric diabetologists were cautious about pump use in children, particularly as a result of the threefold increase in severe hypoglycemia reported among intensively treated patients in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.1 Of these, two-thirds used an insulin pump at some time, and all used regular insulin. With advances in insulin development and in pump features, however, the fear of severe hypoglycemia associated with intensive diabetes management has diminished. It is impossible in this short article to describe all aspects of insulin pump care in youth (here defined as children 5–18 years of age) with diabetes. A more complete description, including our program for starting an insulin pump, is provided elsewhere.2 A consensus statement on insulin pump therapy in the pediatric age group may be helpful to healthcare providers.3 Table 1 lists some advantages and disadvantages of insulin pump use in children. Although insulin pump use is becoming more and more popular among families having a youth with T1D, it is not for everyone. In order for pump therapy to succeed, the youth as well as the parents must want the pump. Diabetes nurse-educators listed 12 other important factors to determine who should start pump therapy.4 They all agreed that doing adequate numbers of blood glucose (BG) tests per day was the most important criterion. Most pediatric centers require this for pump initiation, as this is not only a measure of compliance, but also a necessity for safety. Other criteria for initiation of insulin Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps For Children

Insulin Pumps For Children

Results of recent studies* show that insulin pumps can be both safe and effective for toddlers and young children, provided that their parents are both knowledgeable about and motivated to use the device. An insulin pump may help make the task of balancing insulin and glucose easier and can also help reduce hypoglycaemia. Many clinical studies* confirm that Type 1 patients of all ages who switch from multiple daily injections (MDI) to insulin pump therapy report improvements in their quality of life and increased satisfaction with their treatment. I realized in the first few hours of learning about an insulin pump that life would be different. It was clear to me that with a pump, my child would have a better life. How the MiniMed® 640G insulin pump can help in daily life The MiniMed® 640G insulin pump has many features and settings that may be ideal for younger users. The Bolus Wizard® takes into account previously administered insulin that is still in the body, so that the bolus calculations are more accurate. A child lock feature that disables pump buttons, so insulin can not accidentally be programmed. A remote control is also available to put parents in sole control. Where can my child keep his or her insulin pump? This is often one of the first questions asked by many parents and children. In fact, the pump can be easily attached to a belt or carried in a pocket. Various pump cases are also available. Insulin pumps and sports? How does that work? There are often questions about wearing the pump during activities such as sports, dance and parties. Usually, the pump can remain attached without interfering in these activities. The pump can be disconnected (for up to 60 minutes) for showers, swimming or intense activity. It has to be connected again after, and in ca Continue reading >>

For Active Kids With Type 1 Diabetes, Tubeless Pump Is 'game Changer'

For Active Kids With Type 1 Diabetes, Tubeless Pump Is 'game Changer'

ORLANDO, Fla. - June 20, 2013. It's a date 9-year-old Lexi Bentinganan can recite without pause. It's the day she was introduced to the word 'diabetes' and all the challenges that come with it. [WEB EXTRA: Excerpts from interviews here] It's the day a doctor came into her hospital room and told her parents she was diabetic. It's a day she's accepted. But even at her young age, she refuses to let it define her. She calls diabetes her disease of nuisance. Nothing more. To call Lexi active would be an understatement. Bouncing between singing lessons, homework and an afternoon game of catch with dad, she does it all with a smile and a question of 'what's next?' Parents of children with Type 1 diabetes will tell you, managing the disease can be taxing. There's testing, monitoring and always having to have supplies close at hand. And of course the needles. "I really did not like the shots," Lexi says. "I hated the poke of it every time." When Lexi heard about a tiny new tubeless insulin pump that required fewer shots and let her be as active as she wanted, she knew she had to have it. "When I heard about the OmniPod I begged my dad to get it," she says. "I'm like please can we get it!" The OnmiPod made by Insulet Corporation has been what Lexi likes to call a "game changer" for parents and kids since it's initial release in 2005. Several generations later, the OmniPod is a fraction of its original size and even easier to use. The pod is attached to the skin with adhesive backing and programmed wirelessly with a small cell phone sized device called a PDM or Personal Diabetes Manager. Once attached to her skin, Lexi can deploy a "cannula" or tube in a fraction of a second. It will deliver insulin for the next three days. "I'm very used to it," she says. "It really doesn't hurt Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps Linked To Teen Injuries, Deaths

Insulin Pumps Linked To Teen Injuries, Deaths

Print Font: CHICAGO — Insulin pumps are used by tens of thousands of teenagers worldwide with Type 1 diabetes, but they can be risky and have been linked to injuries and even deaths, a review by federal regulators finds. Parents should be vigilant in watching their children’s use of the pumps, researchers from the Food and Drug Administration wrote. They didn’t advise against using the devices. But they called for more study to address safety concerns in teens and even younger children who use the popular pumps. The federal review of use by young people over a decade found 13 deaths and more than 1,500 injuries connected with the pumps. At times, the devices malfunctioned, but other times, teens were careless or took risks, the study authors wrote. Some teens didn’t know how to use the pumps correctly, dropped them or didn’t take good care of them. There were two possible suicide attempts by teens who gave themselves too much insulin, according to the analysis. “The FDA takes pediatric deaths seriously,” said the agency’s Dr. Judith Cope, lead author of the analysis. “Parental oversight and involvement are important. Certainly teenagers don’t always consider the consequences.” More normal lives The pumps are popular because they allow young people to live more normal lives, giving themselves insulin discreetly in public and getting pizza with friends late at night. And they’re a growing segment of diabetes care, with $1.3 billion in annual sales worldwide, said Kelly Close, a San Francisco-based editor of a patient newsletter. She said 100,000 teenagers may be using them. The pumps are used for those with Type 1 diabetes, which accounts for about 5 to 10 percent of all diabetes cases and used to be called “juvenile diabetes.” The more common Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

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