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Best Alcoholic Drink For Insulin Resistance

And Diabetes

And Diabetes

Diabetes is a common, life-long condition that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. Drinking to excess, for example, can contribute to individuals becoming diabetic. Diabetes is a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations2. There are two main types of diabetes3 Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: Because of genetic factors When a virus or infection triggers an autoimmune response (where the body starts attacking itself). People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed before they’re 40 and there’s currently no way to prevent it. It’s the least common type of diabetes – only 10% of all cases are type 14. Type 2 diabetes. Develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can happen: When people are overweight and inactive. People who are an ‘apple-shape’ (with lots of fat around the abdomen) have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes Because of genetic factors. People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed when they’re over 40, and it’s more common in men. However, more overweight children and Continue reading >>

I Reversed Insulin Resistance And You Can Too

I Reversed Insulin Resistance And You Can Too

It was 2014 and I was looking at a lot of red in my most recent blood work results. What’s all this red?” I asked my Doctor. “Well,” she said, “It shows your cholesterol is on the higher side and you have some insulin resistance.” I know high cholesterol was bad, but “what is insulin resistance, exactly?” I wasn’t quite sure. I’m pretty up on all the latest health information. I’m an athlete, I eat whatever I want, but I burn it all off, don’t I? That’s what I thought, anyway. Turns out that’s not the case. Insulin Resistance is also referred to as Pre-Diabetes! What?!! Thankfully my doctor told me I hadn’t progressed to the point of no return and with a few lifestyle changes we could reverse the trend. I took a much deeper dive into my blood work and more importantly, my diet. As an endurance athlete, I’ve participated in marathons, triathlons, the famed Leadville 100 mountain bike race, multi-day Adventure Races, and more. I always watched what I eat, I don’t drink alcohol, but used to enjoy my chips and dessert. For many years, I bought into the “carbohydrates are your fuel” motto for years and years. My first marathon was in 2000. I planned my intake like a scientist. I knew when I was supposed to take my gels, eat my bars, and drink my drinks. That first race led to my first triathlon, then to my first Adventure Race. And for the first 5-6 years of that decade I was literally off to the races. I loved it. I would train for hours each day, sometimes I’d go out for a 6 hour bike ride, then a 2 hour run, and maybe even mix in a 3 hour paddle on the ocean. It was so much fun, it unlocked the kid in me. What I didn’t realize, however, is that I was over stimulating my pancreas. It wasn’t until years later, 2014 to be exact, th Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Effects Of Body Weight And Alcohol Consumption On Insulin Sensitivity

Effects Of Body Weight And Alcohol Consumption On Insulin Sensitivity

Abstract Obesity is a risk factor for the development of insulin resistance, which can eventually lead to type-2 diabetes. Alcohol consumption is a protective factor against insulin resistance, and thus protects against the development of type-2 diabetes. The mechanism by which alcohol protects against the development of type-2 diabetes is not well known. To determine the mechanism by which alcohol improves insulin sensitivity, we fed water or alcohol to lean, control, and obese mice. The aim of this study was to determine whether alcohol consumption and body weights affect overlapping metabolic pathways and to identify specific target genes that are regulated in these pathways. Adipose tissue dysfunction has been associated with the development of type-2 diabetes. We assessed possible gene expression alterations in epididymal white adipose tissue (WAT). We obtained WAT from mice fed a calorie restricted (CR), low fat (LF Control) or high fat (HF) diets and either water or 20% ethanol in the drinking water. We screened the expression of genes related to the regulation of energy homeostasis and insulin regulation using a gene array composed of 384 genes. Obesity induced insulin resistance and calorie restriction and alcohol improved insulin sensitivity. The insulin resistance in obese mice was associated with the increased expression of inflammatory markers Cd68, Il-6 and Il-1α; in contrast, most of these genes were down-regulated in CR mice. Anti-inflammatory factors such as Il-10 and adrenergic beta receptor kinase 1 (Adrbk1) were decreased in obese mice and increased by CR and alcohol. Also, we report a direct correlation between body weight and the expression of the following genes: Kcnj11 (potassium inwardly-rectifying channel, subfamily J, member 11), Lpin2 (lipin Continue reading >>

Effects Of Moderate Alcohol Intake On Fasting Insulin And Glucose Concentrations And Insulin Sensitivity In Postmenopausal Womena Randomized Controlled Trial

Effects Of Moderate Alcohol Intake On Fasting Insulin And Glucose Concentrations And Insulin Sensitivity In Postmenopausal Womena Randomized Controlled Trial

Context Epidemiologic data demonstrate that moderate alcohol intake is associated with improved insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic individuals. No controlled-diet studies have addressed the effects of daily moderate alcohol consumption on fasting insulin and glucose concentrations and insulin sensitivity. Objective To determine whether daily consumption of low to moderate amounts of alcohol influences fasting insulin and glucose concentrations and insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic postmenopausal women. Design, Setting, and Participants Randomized controlled crossover trial of 63 healthy postmenopausal women, conducted at a clinical research center in Maryland between 1998 and 1999. Interventions Participants were randomly assigned to consume 0, 15, or 30 g/d of alcohol for 8 weeks each as part of a controlled diet. All foods and beverages were provided during the intervention. An isocaloric beverage was provided in the 0-g/d arm. Energy intake was adjusted to maintain constant body weight. Main Outcome Measures Fasting insulin, triglyceride, and glucose concentrations, measured at the end of each dietary period; insulin sensitivity, estimated with a published index of glucose disposal rate corrected for fat-free mass based on fasting insulin and fasting triglyceride concentrations, compared among treatments with a mixed-model analysis of variance. Results A complete set of plasma samples was collected and analyzed for 51 women who completed all diet treatments. Consumption of 30 g/d of alcohol compared with 0 g/d reduced fasting insulin concentration by 19.2% (P = .004) and triglyceride concentration by 10.3% (P = .001), and increased insulin sensitivity by 7.2% (P = .002). Normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals responded similarly. Only fasting triglyceride Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

Having diabetes does not mean you can’t drink alcohol. However, there are reasons to exercise caution when drinking beer, wine or other alcoholic beverages. Some of the points to bear in mind are the effects alcohol has on glucose levels, the calories contained within alcoholic drinks, and how excessive alcohol intake can increase the chance of developing diabetes complications. Measuring Alcohol Intake A standard drink is equal to 14.0 grams (0.6 ounces) of pure alcohol. Generally, this amount of pure alcohol is found in 12-ounces of beer (5% alcohol content). 8-ounces of malt liquor (7% alcohol content). 5-ounces of wine (12% alcohol content). 1.5-ounces or a “shot” of 80-proof (40% alcohol content) distilled spirits or liquor (e.g., gin, rum, vodka, whiskey). Calories Alcohol is a significant source of energy and has more calories gram for gram than carbohydrate and almost as many calories as fat. Many alcoholic drinks, including beers, ciders and cocktails often contain a significant amount of carbohydrate and/or sugar which can add significantly to the calorie content. A single pint of lager typically has around 200 calories and therefore represents 10% of a woman’s daily calorie intake and 8% of a man’s. Having 4 pints of lager would be 40% of a woman’s daily calorie intake and 32% of a man’s. It’s not just lager either, a moderate glass of wine (175ml) can vary between 120 and 150 calories depending on the sweetness of the wine. Hypoglycemia People on diabetic medication that can raise the risk of hypoglycemia need to be particularly cautious of hypos occurring during or after drinking alcohol. These anti-diabetic medications include insulin and oral hypoglycemics such as sulfonylureas and prandial glucose regulators. Alcohol has a number of effec Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

This Festive Alcoholic Drink Fires Up Your Metabolism And Helps You Lose Weight | Daily Star

This Festive Alcoholic Drink Fires Up Your Metabolism And Helps You Lose Weight | Daily Star

But how can you stay slim by knocking back a mulled wine? A study from scientists at Washington State University found that mice who ate resveratrol-rich fruit extracts gained 40% less weight than a control group. Lead researcher Professor Min Du explained: Polyphenols in fruit, including resveratrol, increase gene expression that enhances the oxidation of dietary fats so the body wont be overloaded. They convert white fat into beige fat which burns lipids (fats) off as heat - helping to keep the body in balance and prevent obesity and metabolic dysfunction." Best ways to burn calories without exercising Click through our gallery on the best ways to burn calories without exercising Chew gum - A super-easy way to burn some extra calories is popping a few pieces of gum now and then. The act of chewing keeps your jaw muscles moving, andnot only will you be burning caloriesyoull stop yourself from consuming more calories. If you want to chow down on some other resveratrol-rich foods, opt for blueberries, strawberries or grapes. The professor added: Resveratrol can enhance this conversion of white fat to beige fat and, when you have high rates of browning, it can partially prevent obesity. The current theory is that when we eat excessively, the extra lipids are stored in white fat. "With obesity, the fat cells enlarge to a point where theyre saturated and cant uptake more lipids. As the fat cells become overloaded and die, they release toxins and cause inflammation leading to health problems like insulin resistance and diabetes. Polyphenols like resveratrol are good as they enhance the oxidation of fat so it wont be overloaded. The excess is burned off as heat." Continue reading >>

Can Brief Periods Of Alcohol Abstinence Really Improve Insulin Resistance?

Can Brief Periods Of Alcohol Abstinence Really Improve Insulin Resistance?

With commentary by Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of clinical medicine and director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center, the Bronx. Abstaining from alcohol on a short-term basis improved insulin resistance, according to new research by scientists in the U.K. However, a U.S. expert says the findings are counter to other research and to traditional advice that moderate alcohol intake may benefit those with diabetes. The U.K. researchers, who presented their data at the Liver Meeting 2015 in December in San Francisco, evaluated 102 men and women who were enrolled in the UK's "Dry January" campaign. Those who participated were moderate drinkers who agreed to abstain for a month. The researchers measured changes in insulin resistance (when the body's cells are resistant to the effects of insulin), and also looked at markers of a condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) after a month of the men and women being ''on the wagon." They found reduced insulin resistance, reduced liver stiffness and better blood pressure. The improvements held even after they adjusted for such factors as age, gender, exercise, smoking and diet changes. The researchers can't say how durable the benefits might be, as they only looked at the one-month window. The researchers concluded that the risk of NAFLD increases with more alcohol intake. NAFLD is an extra buildup of fat cells in the liver, but not believed to be caused by alcohol, according to the Liver Foundation. Those who are overweight or have diabetes are more at risk, experts know. Alcohol & diabetes: another view The findings run counter to what would be expected, says Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of clinical medicine and director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center, the Bron Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Guide To Carbs In Alcohol

The Ultimate Guide To Carbs In Alcohol

This is my ultimate guide to carbs in alcohol – the good, the bad and the ugly. You can still enjoy alcohol when living low carb, but by making better choices and in moderation. Alcohol can be a tonic or toxic – it depends on how much and how often. Carbs in alcohol One of the most frequent questions I am asked by newcomers who are contemplating living low carb and sugar free, is “can I still drink alcohol?” “How many carbs in alcohol?” For many readers, it is a deal breaker whether they will even contemplate starting. And readers who have been living low carb for some time want to know why their weight has stalled, could it be their Friday night cocktails? Firstly let me say, I love my wine and and I love bubbles. I love a drink with friends as much as the next person, but I know not to drink to excess, and not to drink too often. Occasional drinks with friends and family is a wonderful way to celebrate, relax, unwind and socialise. As long as alcohol is consumed in moderation and you choose low carb options, you can still enjoy alcohol. Do you know how many drinks you have each week? You need to be completely honest with yourself, and if even the thought of cutting back on alcohol is frightening, you need to get serious about how much and how often you drink. Click To Tweet I know plenty of people that could not entertain the idea of having a night with friends without excessive alcohol yet they complain they can’t lose weight or have medical problems that are associated with alcohol use. They would never associate the two but make no mistake, excessive alcohol is damaging. It is linked to cancer (especially breast, liver and colon), weight gain, alcoholic liver disease, anaemia and heart disease. How alcohol affects our body The health concerns (don’t Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Drinking Could Be Dangerous - Are You In The 'at Risk' Group?

Type 2 Diabetes And Alcohol: Drinking Could Be Dangerous - Are You In The 'at Risk' Group?

Regular high alcohol consumption and binge drinking from age 16 is associated with higher glucose concentrations in women’s blood later in life. High glucose levels are an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes. A new study has assess alcohol consumption data, starting in adolescence, over a 27-year period in relation to their blood glucose levels taken when they were 43 years of age. In women, total alcohol consumption and binge drinking behaviour over 27 years was significantly associated with higher blood glucose levels. This was independent of BMI, hypertension and smoking status at age 43. This association was not true for men, for whom only BMI and hypertension remained associated with increased blood glucose levels. Dr Karina Nygren, lead author from Umea University, Sweden said: “Our findings show that high alcohol consumption from ages 16 to 43 is associated with higher blood glucose levels in women but not in men. “Because higher blood glucose is a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes, our data suggest that informing people about the risk of high alcohol consumption at a young age could have positive health impacts further down the line.” Despite the association between alcohol, binge drinking and blood glucose only being significant in women, men still had higher blood glucose levels than women and consumed nearly three times as much alcohol between ages 16 and 43. Previous studies suggest possible mechanisms for the association between alcohol and elevated blood glucose. For example, human studies have shown that ethanol can increase insulin resistance, which in turn leads to accumulation of glucose in the blood. Studies in rats have also shown that binge drinking behaviour alters the rat’s metabolism in a way that negatively affec Continue reading >>

A Look At Alcohol And The Risk Of Diabetes

A Look At Alcohol And The Risk Of Diabetes

Think of type 2 diabetes and you probably think of obesity: and it is true – excess weight is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Diabetes can be a vicious disease. At its worst it can lead to amputations, blindness, organ failure, and early death. But what about alcohol – can alcohol cause diabetes? How Does Diabetes Work? It’s like this: In the body food is turned into sugar. An excess of food, especially sweets, will turn into an excess of sugar. (While alcohol is not a sugar it is a high-glycemic carbohydrate.) This creates an increased demand for insulin in the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body convert food into usable energy. The body’s sensitivity to the hormone is reduced when insulin levels are consistently high and glucose builds up in the blood. This results in a condition called insulin resistance. Over time, excessive alcohol consumption can decrease the effectiveness of insulin. For the body that cannot make proper use of this glucose, it will instead build up in the blood rather than moving into the cells where it’s needed. Symptoms can include fatigue, hunger, brain fog, and high blood pressure – and not least of all, weight gain. People who have insulin resistance most often don’t realize it’s a problem until it develops into full blown type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can seriously affect quality of life and reduce life expectancy: A 50 year old with diabetes can lose 8.5 of life compared to a 50 year old without diabetes. What Is the Correlation Between Alcohol and Diabetes? While moderate drinking may not necessarily have harmful effects in the development of diabetes, and in fact can even have protective qualities, heavy drinking can be extremely Continue reading >>

Type 1: Alcohol And Insulin Resistance

Type 1: Alcohol And Insulin Resistance

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does alcohol (spirits) and beer cause insulin resistance??? Anybody share your experiences PLeeZ There are quite a few issues with mixing alcohol & diabetes control. In the event of hypoglycaemia (a low.) you might not be awair it's happening if inebriated? Also the liver would be too busy processing the alcohol to liver dump glycogen into the system. Rendering a blood sugar drop more drastic should a low occur...? If you do have alcohol on your breath & a bottle in your hand while hypo? Who's gonna know your low!! You know you should give up the beer to aid your diabetes control.. Stop the procrastination & make the effort.. Here's a lovely video to get you in the mood! Does alcohol (spirits) and beer cause insulin resistance??? Anybody share your experiences PLeeZ I did not see anything online about insulin resistance from alcohol; I saw increased risk of hypo's. Here's a link that gave me a quick run down on alcohol for diabetics: fletchweb Prefer not to say Well-Known Member Type 1s tend to have a diverse range of opinions in regard to lifestyle, level of control and complications. I usually enjoy a glass of red wine every night and have done so for the past 20 years. It's never been an issue for me. And as a rule my insulin consumption over the years has been decreasing not increasing but I'm 55 so it might be an age related thing in regard to insulin consumption. Anyway I have been living with type 1 for over 50 years, have never worried about drinking or anything else I've done - no complications, an amazing life and I continue to have one - Some of us are lucky I guess ... the trick for me is to not worry about it too much - my theory - the st Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance (IR) is a pathological condition in which cells fail to respond normally to the hormone insulin. The body produces insulin when glucose starts to be released into the bloodstream from the digestion of carbohydrates in the diet. Normally this insulin response triggers glucose being taken into body cells, to be used for energy, and inhibits the body from using fat for energy. The concentration of glucose in the blood decreases as a result, staying within the normal range even when a large amount of carbohydrates is consumed. When the body produces insulin under conditions of insulin resistance, the cells are resistant to the insulin and are unable to use it as effectively, leading to high blood sugar. Beta cells in the pancreas subsequently increase their production of insulin, further contributing to a high blood insulin level. This often remains undetected and can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes of adults.[1] Although this type of chronic insulin resistance is harmful, during acute illness it is actually a well-evolved protective mechanism. Recent investigations have revealed that insulin resistance helps to conserve the brain's glucose supply by preventing muscles from taking up excessive glucose.[2] In theory, insulin resistance should even be strengthened under harsh metabolic conditions such as pregnancy, during which the expanding fetal brain demands more glucose. People who develop type 2 diabetes usually pass through earlier stages of insulin resistance and prediabetes, although those often go undiagnosed. Insulin resistance is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) resulting from reduced insulin activity; it is also part of a larger constellation of symptoms called the metabolic syndrome. Insuli Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diet : Alcohol

Prediabetes Diet : Alcohol

Use discretion when drinking alcohol if you have prediabetes. Alcohol is a source of poor quality calories that in excess can be disruptive to your metabolism. Alcohol is one of those “cheat items” that should be consumed sparingly and intelligently. If you are already a full type 2 diabetic and you choose to drink alcohol, only do so when you know your blood sugar level is well-controlled. It’s a good idea to discuss this with your doctor to be sure drinking alcohol is acceptable for you. Other metabolic problems can be affected by alcohol use (your uric acid level for example). Guidelines There are three basic food groups: fats, proteins, and carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are broken down into sugar. It is essential to have all three food groups in your diet to have good nutrition. You should strive to incorporate all three groups in each meal…more Serving Size People with diabetes or metabolic syndrome (pre-diabetes) must eat only the amount of food necessary, and mix foods from the three food groups. It is beneficial to eat…more Creating A Plan There are a number of ways to approach your diet whether you are a diabetic, someone with metabolic syndrome simply overweight. One way may work for some, and another way for others. …more Foods To Avoid Diabetes and metabolic syndrome increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. Insulin resistance, poor lipid levels, high blood pressure and excess body weight all act toward accelerating the development of atherosclerosis (“hardening of the arteries”)…more Supplements Diabetes and metabolic syndrome are accompanied by inflammation, increased blood sugar, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, hormonal imbalances, and other sources of bodily stress such excessive body weight…more Follow the Nutrientology b Continue reading >>

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