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Best Alcoholic Drink For Insulin Resistance

Alcohol And Metabolic Syndrome

Alcohol And Metabolic Syndrome

There are many individuals who drink alcohol sensibly and find that this is something they enjoy. A drink or two with friends can be fun; there can even be health benefits associated with moderate alcohol consumption . Problems develop when people are unable to control their intake. If people abuse alcohol it can have devastating physical and mental health consequences. Those who drink too much are increasing the likelihood of developing problems such as metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome refers to a situation where people suffer from a combination of serious health problems including: * Obesity usually apple shaped weight gain around the abdomen Just because the individual has one of these conditions it does not mean that they have metabolic syndrome; there needs to be a combination of these conditions. The dangers of metabolic syndrome include: Common symptoms that are associated with this condition include: * Increased tendency for clots to form in the blood * Increased likelihood of developing inflammation * Those individuals who have the condition will normally suffer from central obesity. This is where fat accumulates around the abdominal area. * Glucose intolerance and insulin resistance * High levels of triglycerides and low levels of HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) in the blood. This increases the likelihood that the individual will develop plague on the walls of their blood vessels. There are a number of likely causes for metabolic syndrome including: * Genetics almost certainly plays a part in the development of this condition. If people have a family history of relatives with type II diabetes or early heart disease then they will be more at risk of developing metabolic syndrome. * Those individuals who have put on a great deal of weight over time wil Continue reading >>

I Reversed Insulin Resistance And You Can Too

I Reversed Insulin Resistance And You Can Too

It was 2014 and I was looking at a lot of red in my most recent blood work results. What’s all this red?” I asked my Doctor. “Well,” she said, “It shows your cholesterol is on the higher side and you have some insulin resistance.” I know high cholesterol was bad, but “what is insulin resistance, exactly?” I wasn’t quite sure. I’m pretty up on all the latest health information. I’m an athlete, I eat whatever I want, but I burn it all off, don’t I? That’s what I thought, anyway. Turns out that’s not the case. Insulin Resistance is also referred to as Pre-Diabetes! What?!! Thankfully my doctor told me I hadn’t progressed to the point of no return and with a few lifestyle changes we could reverse the trend. I took a much deeper dive into my blood work and more importantly, my diet. As an endurance athlete, I’ve participated in marathons, triathlons, the famed Leadville 100 mountain bike race, multi-day Adventure Races, and more. I always watched what I eat, I don’t drink alcohol, but used to enjoy my chips and dessert. For many years, I bought into the “carbohydrates are your fuel” motto for years and years. My first marathon was in 2000. I planned my intake like a scientist. I knew when I was supposed to take my gels, eat my bars, and drink my drinks. That first race led to my first triathlon, then to my first Adventure Race. And for the first 5-6 years of that decade I was literally off to the races. I loved it. I would train for hours each day, sometimes I’d go out for a 6 hour bike ride, then a 2 hour run, and maybe even mix in a 3 hour paddle on the ocean. It was so much fun, it unlocked the kid in me. What I didn’t realize, however, is that I was over stimulating my pancreas. It wasn’t until years later, 2014 to be exact, th Continue reading >>

Those Weekend Beers Are Making You Insulin Resistant

Those Weekend Beers Are Making You Insulin Resistant

Click to listen to the audio… Those weekend beers are making you insulin resistant A beer boepie – you’ve managed to acquire one. According to your mother-in-law, it’s because you spend the weekends sitting in your chair, eating too much food and drinking beer with your mates. Her fix, which she eagerly shares every opportunity she gets, is that YOU get out of that chair and fix all the stuff around the house, that needs fixing. Your mother-in-law is wrong Stop celebrating…. She’s right, you do need to “fix” it, if you want to be around for the long haul and avoid a heart attack and/or a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. What she’s got wrong is the “fix” – a simple calorie management approach, won’t work. Your beer belly is not being caused by a calorie problem per se, even if you’re eating too much and exercising too little. The problem is routed in the alcohol – your weekend of beer drinking, is making you insulin resistant the rest of the week. This is the finding of a group of researchers from Mount Sinai Medical Centre. The lab bash The research team threw a big party, which lasted three days, for a group of laboratory rats. Some of the rats attending the party, had an opportunity to get a little tipsy, the rest of animals, indulged in fine food. The tipsy rats were kept liquored up by the research team, receiving 3 g/kg of alcohol per day – this set up was designed to simulate a weekend of binge drinking. While the rats enjoying the fine dining, okay, it wasn’t that fancy, they were fed standard rat chow, but their calorie intake was carefully matched to the rats who got to “drink” the whole weekend. So the calorie intake was the same for all the rats, but the metabolic consequences were different. The hang over effect When the pa Continue reading >>

How Does Drinking Alcohol Affect Diabetes And Raising Blood Sugars?

How Does Drinking Alcohol Affect Diabetes And Raising Blood Sugars?

Small amounts of alcohol will not hinder your control over diabetes but there are some precautions that diabetics should take to make sure that alcohol can be safely enjoyed. If you are diabetic and are currently treated with either tablets or insulin the main risk of consuming alcohol is hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia, which most diabetics already know, is when your blood sugar level drops down to an unsafe level. A major problem with drinking alcohol as a diabetic is that other people will have trouble knowing whether you are experiencing hypoglycemia or if you are simply intoxicated. Many of the early warning signs of hypoglycemia are mimicked by alcohol and friends may not seek help for you until you lose consciousness, and maybe not even then. Another problem with a diabetic consuming alcohol is the potential weight gain. Gaining weight while battling diabetes will cause a diabetic to lose control over their disease. There is also the lapse in judgment that comes with drinking. impaired judgment could lead to you eating a whole bunch of things you shouldn’t be eating. Moderation, awareness and good judgment are key when a diabetic is consuming alcohol. It’s good to remember that just because you may be out having a grand old time doesn’t mean that you are taking a vacation from your diabetes. You still need to check your blood sugar levels and look for signs that something is not right. If you are going to drink... Experts consider a sensible drinking limit to be 2-3 alcoholic drinks per day for people without diabetes. Diabetics should drink less, especially those with type 1 diabetes, and should always eat while drinking. They should also check their glucose levels before drinking. It's also very important to let your doctor know if you drink so that he can tak Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Metformin is a medication that helps manage type 2 diabetes and occasionally prediabetes. In general, drinking alcohol while taking metformin is not helpful and not recommended by doctors. The side effects of metformin can be life-threatening with excessive alcohol consumption. Metformin and alcohol both put stress on the liver, so intensifying the harmful effects and increasing the risk of liver complications. How does metformin and alcohol affect the body? Metformin is a popular, effective, and inexpensive management medication, prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In 2014, some 14.4 million people in the United States were prescribed metformin. Metformin is also being used more and more frequently in prediabetes cases. Metformin use in overweight people with type 1 diabetes may also reduce insulin requirements and increase metabolic control. The drug works by improving insulin sensitivity, promoting the uptake of glucose into tissues and lowering sugar levels in the bloodstream. By increasing how effectively the existing glucose is used, metformin reduces the amount of glucose the liver produces and the intestines absorb. Alcohol also affects blood sugars significantly. Alcohol digestion puts stress on the liver, an organ dedicated to the removal of poisons from the body. When the liver is forced to process high amounts of alcohol, it becomes overworked and releases less glucose. Long-term alcohol use can also make cells less sensitive to insulin. This means that less glucose is absorbed from the blood and levels in the bloodstream increase. Over time, alcohol consumption damages the liver, especially when it is consumed in excess. It reduces the liver's ability to produce and regulate glucose. Conditions like alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the live Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Diabetes

Alcohol And Diabetes

Having diabetes does not mean you can’t drink alcohol. However, there are reasons to exercise caution when drinking beer, wine or other alcoholic beverages. Some of the points to bear in mind are the effects alcohol has on glucose levels, the calories contained within alcoholic drinks, and how excessive alcohol intake can increase the chance of developing diabetes complications. Measuring Alcohol Intake A standard drink is equal to 14.0 grams (0.6 ounces) of pure alcohol. Generally, this amount of pure alcohol is found in 12-ounces of beer (5% alcohol content). 8-ounces of malt liquor (7% alcohol content). 5-ounces of wine (12% alcohol content). 1.5-ounces or a “shot” of 80-proof (40% alcohol content) distilled spirits or liquor (e.g., gin, rum, vodka, whiskey). Calories Alcohol is a significant source of energy and has more calories gram for gram than carbohydrate and almost as many calories as fat. Many alcoholic drinks, including beers, ciders and cocktails often contain a significant amount of carbohydrate and/or sugar which can add significantly to the calorie content. A single pint of lager typically has around 200 calories and therefore represents 10% of a woman’s daily calorie intake and 8% of a man’s. Having 4 pints of lager would be 40% of a woman’s daily calorie intake and 32% of a man’s. It’s not just lager either, a moderate glass of wine (175ml) can vary between 120 and 150 calories depending on the sweetness of the wine. Hypoglycemia People on diabetic medication that can raise the risk of hypoglycemia need to be particularly cautious of hypos occurring during or after drinking alcohol. These anti-diabetic medications include insulin and oral hypoglycemics such as sulfonylureas and prandial glucose regulators. Alcohol has a number of effec Continue reading >>

Does Alcohol Spike Insulin?

Does Alcohol Spike Insulin?

I can't seem to find a definitive answer as to whether alcohol increases insulin levels. I've seen some info that suggests alcohol raises your sugar level, and other info that suggests it lowers your sugar level, but nothing about insulin levels. For this question, let's use 80 proof plain vodka as an example. Which, by definition, is 40% alcohol and 60% water (all other "impurities" are supposed to be filtered out of vodka--at least the top end stuff). This takes the question of the sugars in mixed drinks off the table. So, if someone is drinking shots of 80 proof plain vodka, does it spike their insulin level? Continue reading >>

Health In Focus: Diabetes At Your Fingertips

Health In Focus: Diabetes At Your Fingertips

DIABETES affects some two million people in Britain, yet many remain ignorant about the disease. Here, in At your fingertips' accessible question and answer style, we present information on various aspects of the condition and how to deal with it. All answers are by qualified health professionals and convey sound information in plain English. Section 1: about the disease Are there different types of diabetes? Yes, diabetes exists in many different forms. Two main groups are recognized. Younger people (under 40 years old) in whom the condition develops in a fairly dramatic way and for whom insulin injections are nearly always needed. About 30% of all people with diabetes fall into this category, known as type 1 diabetes (or insulin dependent diabetes, IDD for short; or juvenile-onset diabetes). Related Articles 12 June 2001[Health]: A million diabetics go missing 17 Oct 2001 29 May 2000: One million 'unaware they are diabetic' 17 Oct 2001 12 April 2000: Diagnosis delays 'add to dangers of diabetes' 17 Oct 2001 17 November 1998: Diabetics deserve a sporting chance 17 Oct 2001 22 February 1997: The food 'cure' for diabetes [controlling diabetes through diet] 17 Oct 2001 At the other end of the scale is the older person who develops diabetes with less obvious symptoms and who is often overweight. In this group insulin by injection is not normally needed and these people are described as having type 2 diabetes (or non-insulin dependent diabetes, NIDD for short; or maturity-onset diabetes). There are plenty of exceptions to this rule. Occasionally young people can be well controlled with diet or tablets and quite a large number of people who develop diabetes late in life are much better off on insulin injections. Do other diseases increase the chances of getting diabetes? Yes Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Weight Loss (the Best & Worst Drinks)

Alcohol And Weight Loss (the Best & Worst Drinks)

Alcohol and Weight Loss (The Best & Worst Drinks) Most of us already know alcohol and weight loss are just two words that never go together. Even though its well known alcohol wont help with losing weight there are some bad and smart choices you can make. In fact, alcohol does have some health benefits so you dont have to totally lose the booze. As summer arrives Ill always get questions asking if alcohol will make you gain weight. The answer I always gives them is complicated. All the outdoor parties, social gatherings, weddings, holidays and pool time just seem to add up. And of course the best way to have fun at these events is to drink some alcohol. To be honest even though I eat clean most of the time I still do like to enjoy some guilt-free drinking with my friends once in a while. My goal with this blog post is to inform you on the good and bad side of alcohol along with the best and worst choices you can make for weight loss. Ill also be throwing in some awesome tools and resources you can use to easily check whether or not that alcoholic drink you and your friends are going to down will be good or bad. In my experience, people are either going to drink or not drink. So I dont think its real world practical to tell people whether they should be drinking or not. The best thing I can do is to inform you on the best and worst drinks when it comes to alcohol and weight loss. First things first lets talk about the benefits of drinking alcohol. Believe it or not there have been some scientific studies that have found evidence alcohol can actually be good for you. For one, moderate alcohol consumption can boost your insulin sensitivity . Think of your insulin as the key that helps to unlock your cells so they can better absorb nutrients. People who become diabetic hav Continue reading >>

Red Wine And Tea Can Help Regulate Your Blood Sugar

Red Wine And Tea Can Help Regulate Your Blood Sugar

Red wine and tea continue to make headlines as some of the most promising “functional foods” of the 21st century. But it takes a little bit of digging to get to the bottom of what’s really healthy, and not so healthy, about these two beverages. Should You Drink Red Wine? No doubt about it, red wine contains lots of antioxidants, namely polyphenols, which are known to fight free radicals and reduce your risk of a number of degenerative conditions from cancer and heart disease to neurodegenerative diseases. And resveratrol, perhaps the most talked about antioxidant in red wine, may even extend your lifespan. So should you have a glass now and then? In my opinion, no. This is largely because, despite the other healthy properties in red wine, the alcohol itself is actually a neurotoxin, which means it can poison your brain. Additionally, it has the strong potential to seriously disrupt your delicate hormone balance. This may be why if you drink heavy amounts of beer and spirits you may double your risk of developing colorectal tumors. You also need to be aware that consuming large amounts of wine will increase insulin levels and eventually have a negative impact on your health. This is especially important for people who already show signs of insulin resistance, such as high blood pressure, extra weight, high cholesterol, and, yes, diabetes. This is contradictory to the study above, which found that wine actually benefits blood sugar. Well, keep in mind that this study only looked at wine’s ability to inhibit the activity of a single target enzyme, and not how it would impact your entire system. Having said that, it is important to understand some important facts about resveratrol. Because this antioxidant is soluble in alcohol, you will get far more absorption if y Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance | Angry Chair Brewing

Insulin Resistance | Angry Chair Brewing

look: 4 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4.25 This beer is great for what it is. The concept beers are not meant to be balanced to style, they are meant to be experimental. Most of what AC does is great. This one was a little sweet for me, but tasted like straight smores. The lactose masters strike again! look: 4.5 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.75 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5 A: Pours silky octopus ink and syrup looking. Inch brown head with good lacing. N: Pronounced sweetness, somewhat vague vanilla and chocolate. T: I was expecting intense chocolate sweetness, but got Banana, Walnut and Chocolate. My drinking buddy agreed. However, half way through my pint, the Banana faded and in its' place I got Strawberry. This beer is very sweet and is definitely a dessert beer. I'm not quite sure what flavors for which AC was aiming, but if you like the zany sweet creations of Ben and Jerry's ice cream, and like dessert style stouts, seek this one out. 11.1 abv undetectable. O: Even though the sweet flavors were somewhat of an unorthodox mix, I really enjoyed this beer and would love to try it on tap. Bourbon barrel aging would probably make this stellar. look: 4.5 | smell: 4.5 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.25 Reviewed from notes. From a swing-top 32 oz. growler filled the day before consuming. Poured into an El Catador Barrel-Aged glass. A: Essentially black and opaque. Minimal visible carbonation, and this looks thick during the pour. Forms a half-finger of tan head that fades fairly quickly. This coats the glass well. S: Sweet aroma overall. Dark chocolate, vanilla, and caramel. A sweet candied vanilla thats the marshmallow here. Dark roasted malts, and a modest coffee in the background; but theres so much sweet Milky Way-type aromas over the top of the Continue reading >>

Alcohol Debate: How Drinking Affects Your Health

Alcohol Debate: How Drinking Affects Your Health

The Alcohol Debate: Should You or Shouldn't You? By Kathleen Zelman, MPH, RD, LD WebMD Weight Loss Clinic How drinking affects your health Has a daily drink replaced the apple a day as a way to keep the doctor away? Scientists have long touted the heart benefits of drinking small amounts of alcohol. Newer studies have credited moderate drinking with everything from helping to keep our minds sharp as we age to lowering our risk of developing diabetes. In fact, the new U.S. dietary guidelines give many of us official permission to enjoy one to two drinks daily. This is great news for folks who follow the French lifestyle of sipping a glass of wine with dinner, or who enjoy an evening cocktail. But what about teetotalers -- should they start drinking? Are there some people who shouldn't drink, under any circumstances? And how do you balance the health effects of alcohol with its high calorie count? Since some 55% of U.S. adults drink alcohol according to the CDC, it's important to understand how it affects our health. To get some answers, WebMD talked to experts about alcohol's risks and benefits and its place in a healthy diet. Does It Help or Hurt? Drinking alcohol can be good for your health, but it can also be harmful. It all depends on how much you drink, your age, and other factors. There's no denying that too much alcohol can lead to serious problems. Excess alcohol can increase your risk of: Liver disease High blood fats (triglycerides) Heart failure Fetal alcohol syndrome (if you're pregnant) Certain cancers Injury, violence, and death And, of course, drinking too much alcohol piles on the calories, which can lead to obesity and a higher risk for diabetes. For some segments of the population, alcohol can lead to many health problems. Those who should not drink inc Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Alcohol On Insulin Resistance

The Effect Of Alcohol On Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance and diabetes are not the same thing, but these medical issues are closely related. With insulin resistance, the body stops responding normally to the hormone insulin. This leads to a buildup of blood sugar. If left unchecked, insulin resistance commonly leads to type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Some people, with a condition called prediabetes, are insulin resistant but are not yet diabetic. Research suggests that alcohol has an effect on insulin resistance. This effect seems to be variable, however, depending on the amount of alcohol consumed and the pattern of drinking. A person's sex, race and body mass index also seem to influence the effect of alcohol on insulin resistance. Video of the Day Past studies suggested that moderate drinking might reduce insulin resistance and protect against T2DM. More current studies, however, call this into question. A September 2015 "Diabetes Care" article reported on pooled results from 38 studies that evaluated the relationship between alcohol intake and T2DM risk. The researchers found that overall, people who drank 1 standard alcoholic beverage daily were 18 percent less likely to develop T2DM compared to nondrinkers. However, when the researchers analyzed the results further, they found the protective effect was only experienced by certain groups of people. Influence of Gender In examining the results of the 2015 "Diabetes Care" study by the sex of the participants, a reduced T2DM risk associated with alcohol consumption was seen only in women. The greatest level of reduced risk was seen with moderate drinking among women, approximately 2 standard drinks per day. Female study participants who drank heavily -- approximately 5 or more drinks per day -- did not experience a reduced risk for T2DM. Among men, drinking was fo Continue reading >>

Can Brief Periods Of Alcohol Abstinence Really Improve Insulin Resistance?

Can Brief Periods Of Alcohol Abstinence Really Improve Insulin Resistance?

With commentary by Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of clinical medicine and director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center, the Bronx. Abstaining from alcohol on a short-term basis improved insulin resistance, according to new research by scientists in the U.K. However, a U.S. expert says the findings are counter to other research and to traditional advice that moderate alcohol intake may benefit those with diabetes. The U.K. researchers, who presented their data at the Liver Meeting 2015 in December in San Francisco, evaluated 102 men and women who were enrolled in the UK's "Dry January" campaign. Those who participated were moderate drinkers who agreed to abstain for a month. The researchers measured changes in insulin resistance (when the body's cells are resistant to the effects of insulin), and also looked at markers of a condition called non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) after a month of the men and women being ''on the wagon." They found reduced insulin resistance, reduced liver stiffness and better blood pressure. The improvements held even after they adjusted for such factors as age, gender, exercise, smoking and diet changes. The researchers can't say how durable the benefits might be, as they only looked at the one-month window. The researchers concluded that the risk of NAFLD increases with more alcohol intake. NAFLD is an extra buildup of fat cells in the liver, but not believed to be caused by alcohol, according to the Liver Foundation. Those who are overweight or have diabetes are more at risk, experts know. Alcohol & diabetes: another view The findings run counter to what would be expected, says Joel Zonszein, MD, professor of clinical medicine and director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center, the Bron Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Guide To Carbs In Alcohol

The Ultimate Guide To Carbs In Alcohol

This is my ultimate guide to carbs in alcohol – the good, the bad and the ugly. You can still enjoy alcohol when living low carb, but by making better choices and in moderation. Alcohol can be a tonic or toxic – it depends on how much and how often. Carbs in alcohol One of the most frequent questions I am asked by newcomers who are contemplating living low carb and sugar free, is “can I still drink alcohol?” “How many carbs in alcohol?” For many readers, it is a deal breaker whether they will even contemplate starting. And readers who have been living low carb for some time want to know why their weight has stalled, could it be their Friday night cocktails? Firstly let me say, I love my wine and and I love bubbles. I love a drink with friends as much as the next person, but I know not to drink to excess, and not to drink too often. Occasional drinks with friends and family is a wonderful way to celebrate, relax, unwind and socialise. As long as alcohol is consumed in moderation and you choose low carb options, you can still enjoy alcohol. Do you know how many drinks you have each week? You need to be completely honest with yourself, and if even the thought of cutting back on alcohol is frightening, you need to get serious about how much and how often you drink. Click To Tweet I know plenty of people that could not entertain the idea of having a night with friends without excessive alcohol yet they complain they can’t lose weight or have medical problems that are associated with alcohol use. They would never associate the two but make no mistake, excessive alcohol is damaging. It is linked to cancer (especially breast, liver and colon), weight gain, alcoholic liver disease, anaemia and heart disease. How alcohol affects our body The health concerns (don’t Continue reading >>

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