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Bbdc Diabetes Update

Fructose: Back To The Future?

Fructose: Back To The Future?

See corresponding articles on pages 506 and 519 . Sugars have emerged as the dominant nutrient of concern. Attention has focused squarely on the fructose moiety as the main bad actor in sugars due to its unique set of biochemical, metabolic, and endocrine responses. Fructose is increasingly being regarded as the principal driver of obesity, diabetes, and their downstream cardiometabolic complications ( 1 , 2 ), a point of view now widely propagated in popular books ( 3 6 ) and documentary movies ( 7 , 8 ). This special concern about fructose was not always the case. It bears remembering that there was an early interest in fructose as an alternative sweetener in diabetes. In 1915, the first diabetologist in the United States, Elliot Joslin, reported that fructose (also known as levulose) was handled differently than glucose-containing carbohydrates ( 9 ), a finding that built on even earlier work ( 10 , 11 ). Joslin later concluded in the first English-language textbook of diabetes, The Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus (3rd edition), that, ... levulose can be used with advantage in the diabetic diet in very small amounts daily for intermittent periods. ( 12 ). This favorable view of fructose continued to be held for the next 50 y and was formalized with the introduction of clinical practice guidelines for diabetes in the 1970s. The American Diabetes Association in its 1979 recommendations for nutrition therapy ( 13 ) indicated that an important principle of nutrition therapy for people with diabetes was the focus on limiting glucose-containing sugars (glucose, sucrose, lactose, and maltose) and refined starches, which readily hydrolyze to glucose, as a means of limiting the rapid increase in blood glucose that results from their ingestion. Emphasis was placed on replacing Continue reading >>

Banting & Best Diabetes Centre - Home | Facebook

Banting & Best Diabetes Centre - Home | Facebook

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: Archie Sopman Diabetes Research and Education Awards 2018 (For University Health Network employees only) This funding program is open to University Health Network (UHN) staff physicians, dietitians, nurses, social workers, pharmacists, and scientists whose major job description involves diabetes research, diabetes education, or diabetes clinical care. Funding is available for travel to one diabetes-specific meeting occurring in the year 2018, or to suppo...rt a visiting lecturer in diabetes or metabolic disorders visiting in the year 2018. To be eligible to apply, applicants must be employed by the UHN on a full-time or part-time basis. The principal applicant must also be a registered member* of the BBDC at the time of application submission. The deadline for receipt of applications is 5 p.m., March 27, 2018. BBDC Funding Opportunity: Postdoctoral Fellowships 2018/2019 The Banting & Best Diabetes Centre will be awarding a number of postdoctoral fellowships to candidates at the post-PhD or post-MD degree stages. The one-year fellowships normally commencing on July 1, 2018 (and no later than September 1, 2018) are for full-time research training in diabetes. To be eligible, the candidate's proposed supervisor must be conducting diabetes research and must hold a faculty appointment... with the University of Toronto at the level of Assistant, Associate, or Full Professor. The proposed supervisor must be employed by the University of Toronto or a University of Toronto-affiliated institution, and must be a registered member* of the BBDC at the time of application submission. Candidates must have received a doctoral degree (PhD) after July 2014, or a medical degree (MD) after July 2009 and must be within their first four years of postgraduate research tr Continue reading >>

Effect Of Dried Fruit On Postprandial Glycemia: A Randomized Acute-feeding Trial

Effect Of Dried Fruit On Postprandial Glycemia: A Randomized Acute-feeding Trial

Effect of dried fruit on postprandial glycemia: a randomized acute-feeding trial Nutrition & Diabetesvolume8, Articlenumber:59 (2018) | Download Citation To investigate the effect of dried fruit in modifying postprandial glycemia, we assessed the ability of 4 dried fruits (dates, apricots, raisins, sultanas) to decrease postprandial glycemia through three mechanisms: a glycemic index (GI) effect, displacement effect, or catalytic fructose effect. We conducted an acute randomized, multiple-crossover trial in an outpatient setting in 10 healthy adults. Participants received 3 white bread control meals and 12 dried fruit test meals in random order. The test meals included each of 4 dried fruits (dates, apricots, raisins, sultanas) alone (GI effect), 4 of the dried fruits displacing half the available carbohydrate in white bread (displacement effect), or 4 of the dried fruits providing a small catalytic dose (7.5 g) of fructose added to white bread (catalytic fructose effect). The protocol followed the ISO method for the determination of GI (ISO 26642:2010). The primary outcome was mean SEM GI (glucose scale) for ease of comparison across the three mechanisms. Ten healthy participants (7 men, 3 women; mean SD age and BMI: 39 12 years and 25 2 kg/m2) were recruited and completed the trial. All dried fruit had a GI below that of white bread (GI = 71); however, only dried apricots (GI = 42 5), raisins (GI = 55 5), and sultanas (51 4) showed a significant GI effect (P < 0.05). When displacing half the available carbohydrate in white bread, all dried fruit lowered the GI; however, only dried apricots (GI = 57 5) showed a significant displacement effect (P = 0.025). None of the dried fruits showed a beneficial catalytic fructose effect. In conclusion, dried fruits have a lower G Continue reading >>

Nuts As A Replacement For Carbohydrates In The Diabetic Diet: A Reanalysis Of A Randomised Controlled Trial

Nuts As A Replacement For Carbohydrates In The Diabetic Diet: A Reanalysis Of A Randomised Controlled Trial

, Volume 61, Issue8 , pp 17341747 | Cite as Nuts as a replacement for carbohydrates in the diabetic diet: a reanalysis of a randomised controlled trial In line with current advice, we assessed the effect of replacing carbohydrate consumption with mixed nut consumption, as a source of unsaturated fat, on cardiovascular risk factors and HbA1c in type 2 diabetes. The data presented here are from a paper that was retracted at the authors request ( ) owing to lack of adjustment for repeated measures in the same individual. Our aim, therefore, was to fix the error and add new complementary data of interest, including information on clotting factors and LDL particle size. A total of 117 men and postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes who were taking oral glucose-lowering agents and with HbA1c between 47.5 and 63.9mmol/mol (6.58.0%) were randomised after stratification by sex and baseline HbA1c in a parallel design to one of three diets for 3months: (1) full-dose nut diet (n = 40): a diet with 2.0MJ (477kcal) per 8.4MJ (2000kcal) energy provided as mixed nuts (75g/day); (2) full-dose muffin diet (n = 39): a diet with 1.97MJ (471kcal) per 8.4MJ (2000kcal) energy provided as three whole-wheat muffins (188g/day), with a similar protein content to the nuts, and the same carbohydrate-derived energy content as the monounsaturated fatty acid-derived energy content in the nuts; or (3) half-dose nut diet (n = 38): a diet with 1.98MJ (474kcal) per 8.4MJ (2000kcal) energy provided as half portions of both the nuts and muffins. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c. The study was carried out in a hospital clinical research centre and concluded in 2008. Only the statistician, study physicians and analytical technicians could be blinded to the group assessment. A total of 108 participan Continue reading >>

News - Canadian Foundation For Pharmacy

News - Canadian Foundation For Pharmacy

Supporting Innovation in Pharmacy for a Healthier Canada Approximately 800 pharmacists across Canada have joined the BBDC's network already. Community pharmacists can draw upon experts at Banting & Best Diabetes Centre (BBDC) to better support patients with diabetesparticularly those with complex needs. Almost 800 pharmacists have joined BBDCs Diabetes Pharmacists Network , an online community that offers learnings from both the experts at the Centre and in the form of peer-to-peer exchange with other network members. The network is open to all Canadian pharmacists and pharmacy students, and there is no cost to join. The majority of members are staff community pharmacists, notes Lori MacCallum, Program Director at BBDC. Some are Certified Diabetes Educators, but most are not, and thats not a requirement for joining. Learnings revolve around patient cases where the answers are not always black and white, and arent easily found in the clinical guidelines, says MacCallum. For example, one of the learning modules addresses individualizing drug therapy for patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Each module includes a 20- to 30-minute educational video, broken down into easy-to-navigate chapters, presented by one of BBDCs diabetes experts. Participants can also get an immediate sense of pharmacists current practice behaviours by viewing aggregate results to questions posed in the module. Members can post comments in the discussion area, and access peer-reviewed articles and patient education tools in the toolbox area. Evaluation results have been extremely positive, with almost everyone saying theyve learned something new, that theyve gained confidence or received validation that theyre doing the right thing, says MacCallum. Feedback is prospective as well. We as Continue reading >>

News & Events Toronto Diabetes Care Connect

News & Events Toronto Diabetes Care Connect

Insulin Competency Development Report Released Toronto Diabetes Care Connect has releasedthe following report:Insulin Competency Development: A Report of the Insulin Standards Working Group (Toronto Central LHIN Region). This report includes a comprehensive summary of the work of the Insulin Standards Working Group (2013 2017) and a number of recommendations regarding insulin competency development. We have a brand new name, look & website! Toronto Diabetes Care Connect (previously known as Toronto Central LHIN Diabetes Program) has re-branded and created a new website to better support the following: Improved awareness of what diabetes supports are available in the Toronto Central Region among people living with diabetes and those who support them Easier connection for everyone to available diabetes-related supports [] Banting & Best Diabetes Centre (BBDC), Health Quality Education and Safety (QUEST) Committee has launched its new website. This website is focused on supporting healthcare providers who are working in diabetes around the delivery of high quality diabetes-related care. Visit www.diabetesquest.ca to see what it has to offer. Diabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines Diabetes Canada releases clinical practice guidelines every 5 years. VisitDiabetes Canada Clinical Practice Guidelines websiteto access the 2013Clinical Practice Guidelinesfor Diabetes Management & Prevention in Canada as well as a number of informative videos and useful tools for healthcare providers can be found on the.New guidelines will be released in 2018. Continue reading >>

Glucagon.com

Glucagon.com

Similarly, funding for research fellows is available, via a competitive basis from the CIHR (formerly MRC), NCIC , Canadian Diabetes Association , the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International , the Crohns and Colitis Foundation of Canada , and Drucker lab operating grants. Students interested in the possibility of graduate training are welcome to send us an email with their CV. Prospective students are reminded that independent of finding a supervisor, they also need to apply to a graduate Department, such as Institute of Medical Sciences or the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology . To inquire about possibilities for research training, send your CV, including a list of potential references and an expression of career interests to Dr. Drucker by email at [email protected] . Potential candidates should be aware that positions are awarded on a highly competitive basis, with consideration to academic track record, direct experience in the field, and relevant publications. Continue reading >>

Bbdc (@bbdc_uoft) | Twitter

Bbdc (@bbdc_uoft) | Twitter

Pending Pending follow request from @BBDC_UofT Cancel Cancel your follow request to @BBDC_UofT Banting & Best Diabetes Centre: Canadas leading centre of excellence for innovation in diabetes research, education, and clinical care. Are you sure you want to view these Tweets? Viewing Tweets won't unblock @BBDC_UofT Be sure to apply for travel grants to the 5th BBDC-Joslin-UCPH Conference being held in Copenhagen this October! Thanks. Twitter will use this to make your timeline better. Undo The next Trainee Lab Seminar takes place today at noon featuring members of Dr. Robert Screaton's lab Thanks. Twitter will use this to make your timeline better. Undo Trainee Travel Awards 2017/2018 and Sir Frederick Banting Legacy Foundation Travel Awards 2017/2018 applications are due by 5pm today! Thanks. Twitter will use this to make your timeline better. Undo Be sure to get your Trainee Travel Awards 2017/2018 and Sir Frederick Banting Legacy Foundation Travel Awards 2017/2018 applications in by the deadline of April 17! Thanks. Twitter will use this to make your timeline better. Undo Registration for the BBDC's 29th Annual Scientific Day closes on April 20. Be sure to register your lab in time! Thanks. Twitter will use this to make your timeline better. Undo Applications are now being accepted for the 5th BBDC-Joslin-UCPH Conference Travel Grant Competition Thanks. Twitter will use this to make your timeline better. Undo Thanks Tony for bringing me into the 21st century! Will tweet through the 2 great organizations I represent I am delighted to announce that I have managed to successfully get our Lew83370451Gary to start Twitting! Welcome Gary! Thanks. Twitter will use this to make your timeline better. Undo BBDC_UofT seminar speaker Harvard Researcher Dr. Pere Puigserver...Full Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self-management Education

Diabetes Self-management Education

What kind of diabetes self-management education and training do you offer? Geared toward children and adults of all ages, our self-management diabetes education offerings are based on the seven American Association of Diabetes Educators Self-Care Behaviors : The experts at the Barnstable Brown Diabetes Center Education Services provide a myriad of both individual and group education classes focused on the self-management of Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes: Group classes upon diagnosis or diabetes knowledge update. One-on-one sessions customized to meet specific diabetes needs. Individualized diabetes medical nutrition therapy. Training on the use of devices to deliver diabetes medications that cannot be taken orally. Training on the use of blood glucose monitoring equipment. Insulin pump assessment and/or training to learn about and/or how to use the available options. Continuous glucose monitoring/training to assist with navigation of the device and its features. Education about diabetes in special situations, such as pregnancy, and its effects on blood glucose control and diabetes management. Continue reading >>

Bbdc Diabetes Update

Bbdc Diabetes Update

Friday, April 21, 2017 - Hilton Toronto Hotel This years conference will emphasize the importance of partnerships and collaboration towards improving care of people living with diabetes. This one-day continuing education event is targeted to health care providers in primary and specialty care who are involved in diabetes education and management. Highlights include: How do we make team-based care work in reality? The top 5 papers of the year: should they change our practices, and why? Pragmatic tips to address the diabetes/heart disease/kidney disease triad How can we best ensure safety and quality care of diabetes in the elderly? Strategies for helping patients with diabetes and disordered eating Patients with socioeconomic barriers and challenges: how can we help? Transitioning patients from the pediatric to adult setting: what to consider Over 50% of the meeting time will be devoted to active learning utilizing interactive case studies and interactive touch pads. Continuing Professional Development (CPD), Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, is fully accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of Continuing Medical Education (CACME), a subcommittee of the Committee on Accreditation of Canadian Medical Schools (CACMS). This standard allows CPD to review and assess educational activities based on the criteria established by The College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. It is the policy of University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Continuing Professional Development to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor in all its individually accredited or jointly accredited educational programs. Speakers and/or planning committee members, participating in University of Toronto accredited p Continue reading >>

Kansas Boy Meets Couple Who Donated His Diabetic Alert Dog

Kansas Boy Meets Couple Who Donated His Diabetic Alert Dog

Kansas boy meets couple who donated his diabetic alert dog TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) For the last several months, WIBW-TV has been covering the story of Isaiah Ramirez, the boy who needed a diabetic alert dog. In mid-February a local couple donated the full $5,000 cost to make that dream a reality. The two families hadn't ever met in person until this month. Scott and Sherri Hunsicker have been in close contact with Leslie Lewis and Isaiah over the phone, but this was the first face-to-face. "I was really excited to be able to meet Isaiah and Midas," Scott Hunsicker said. It was also the first time they got to meet Midas, the diabetic alert dog they bought for Isaiah. Isaiah named him Midas, and it's a fitting name. "Isaiah's golden gift because he was a gift, and he is a golden retriever so it's kind of a coincidence," Lewis said. Midas has an important job to do helping Isaiah keep his blood sugar levels in check with his acute sense of smell. "Anything under 90, anything above 140," Lewis said. "He does different things like sniffing around, trying to figure out where it's coming from and he'll kind of stick his nose up in the air and lift his head back and that's usually when I know when something's wrong." Lewis continued, "The first time it happened, I think it was the third night we were home and it was in the middle of the night." Lewis told Scott and Sherry Hunsicker about the spike, "She told me that was in excess of 500 ... that's real serious. That's the kind of thing you wanna avoid in broad daylight." Ever since they got the dog in mid-April, Midas has kept close watch of Isaiah, even in the middle of the night. "Diabetes is 24/7. You don't get five days on and two days off," Scott Hunsicker said. While the families met, Midas not only paid attention to Isaiah bu Continue reading >>

Lori Maccallum - Diabetes Action Canada - Spor Network : Diabetes Action Canada Spor Network

Lori Maccallum - Diabetes Action Canada - Spor Network : Diabetes Action Canada Spor Network

Sun Life Financial Professor in Wellness and Diabetes Education, Program Director Knowledge Translation and Optimizing Care Models, Banting & Beset Diabetes Centre, Faculty of Medicine Assistant Professor, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy Affiliate Research Scientist, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, Co-Investigator of KT-Patient Engagement Transforming Community-Based Primary Health Care (CBPHC) Knowledge and Knowledge Tools to address patient-generated priorities through the involvement of patients, the public, researchers and healthcare providers Dr. MacCallum leads the development and evaluation of innovative educational programs designed to support and empower pharmacists in the care of people with diabetes. Recognizing the need for pharmacists to play a greater role in the medication management of diabetes patients, she founded the first Canadian Diabetes Pharmacists Network and is the Editor-in-Chief of the BBDC Guidebook on Diabetes Management which has been referenced by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care and is used by over 6000 health care providers across Canada. Her current research focuses on the evaluation of expanded pharmacy services including an evaluation of the MedsCheck Diabetes program in Ontario. Her research aims to identify the most substantial barriers and facilitators to follow-up of people with diabetes and to develop and evaluate strategies to improve follow-up by community pharmacists using quality improvement methods. Continue reading >>

Transforming Health: Made-in-ontario Solutions For Diabetes Care

Transforming Health: Made-in-ontario Solutions For Diabetes Care

This report is also part of the Transforming Health Market Insights Series . Over the past six months, MaRS Market Intelligence has released two Transforming Health reports where we explored the major shifts occurring within Canadian healthcare. In this blog and two upcoming blogs, we will explore how these shifts directly impact care as it applies to particular conditions. We start with a look at the challenges faced by individuals living with diabetes, the ways in which diabetes care is changing, and end with several innovative solutions being developed in Ontario. Over 30 million Canadians and Americans have diabetes, and the number of individuals with diabetes continues to grow. 1, 2 Over 86 million adults in the US have prediabetes (a condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but are not yet in the diabetic state), but 90% are unaware of their condition. 2 Between 15% and 30% of those with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within five years. 2 To say diabetes is a serious health condition is an understatement. Studies have determined that having diabetes significantly reduces ones quality of life, 1 and if blood glucose levels are poorly controlled, individuals may suffer from devastating complications such as blindness, renal disease and premature death. 3 Adults with diabetes have a greater risk of heart disease, stroke, and amputation of toes, feet or legs. 2 The good news is that in some cases, type 2 diabetes (which makes up 90% of the diabetic population) 4 can be prevented or delayed through mitigating the key risk factors via weight loss, healthy eating and exercise. 2 Both types of diabetes can, in fact, be managed by carefully controlling blood glucose levels (through appropriate diet, insulin and medications) in addition to physi Continue reading >>

Functional And Structural Cone Abnormalities In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes | Iovs | Arvo Journals

Functional And Structural Cone Abnormalities In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes | Iovs | Arvo Journals

ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract| March 2012 Functional and Structural Cone Abnormalities in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Department of Physics and Astronomy, School of Optometry and WIN, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada Department of Physics and Astronomy, School of Optometry and WIN, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Commercial Relationships Wylie Tan, None; Yaiza Garcia-Sanchez, None; Laura Finkelberg, None; Tom Wright, None; Marsha Kisilak, None; Melanie Campbell, . (P); Carol Westall, None Support CFI, NSERC, CIHR, CHRP, JDRF, VSRP, SickKids RESTRACOMP, BBDC Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 371. doi: Functional and Structural Cone Abnormalities in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes You will receive an email whenever this article is corrected, updated, or cited in the literature. You can manage this and all other alerts in My Account Wylie Tan, Yaiza Garcia-Sanchez, Laura Finkelberg, Tom Wright, Marsha Kisilak, Melanie Campbell, Carol Westall; Functional and Structural Cone Abnormalities in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Continue reading >>

Easier Access To Insulin Through Discounted Direct Purchase Program

Easier Access To Insulin Through Discounted Direct Purchase Program

Easier Access To Insulin Through Discounted Direct Purchase Program Easier Access To Insulin Through Discounted Direct Purchase Program Your doctor can help you keep your blood sugar under control. (NAPS) Posted: Thursday, February 21, 2019 6:44 am Easier Access To Insulin Through Discounted Direct Purchase Program By NAPS, North American Precis Syndicate mchnews.com (NAPSI)According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 30 million Americans have diabetesand over 7 million of them dont even know it. Feeling very hungryeven though youre eating Weight losseven though you are eating more Tingling, pain or numbness in the hands or feet. If you or someone you care for has any of these signs, see your doctor. Early detection and treatment can decrease the risk of developing complications, which can include blindness, limb loss and premature death. Fortunately, doctors today have many ways to keep diabetes under control. For example, losing weight, eating healthy and increasing physical activity can dramatically reduce the progression of diabetes. In addition, you can take insulin to control blood glucose. Making it even easier for patients to get, one biopharmaceutical company, MannKind Corporation, is currently offering a discount on a specific insulin for people living with diabetes through a direct purchase program. Participation in this innovative cash program, which is available to all eligible patients with a valid prescription, is simple. The first 1,000 people to register at www.insulinsavings.com get introductory pricing for the program, which offers the drug for as little as $4 a day for the first 12 months. All participants will see attractive cash pricing. To enroll, go to www.insulinsavings.com , click the Register Now button and follow the instruction Continue reading >>

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