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Basal Bolus Insulin Therapy

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Basal Bolus Insulin Therapy For Type 1 Diabetes

There is no “one size fits all” approach for treating type 1 diabetes. It’s important to find the most suitable program that fits in with your eating and sleeping routines and activity levels. Which insulin therapy is right for you? Every therapy for type 1 diabetes features a base or “basal” form of insulin. Having enough basal insulin throughout the day gives your cells a steady level of sugar for energy. Without it, your blood sugar and ketones could rise, leading to a potentially fatal condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis. The amount of basal insulin each person needs varies, but typically demand will be greatest early in the morning owing to physical activity during the day. There are several types of basal insulin available, with different coverage. Types of Basal Bolus insulin Intermediate-acting insulin can be taken 1-2 times a day, and works after 1–3 hours, peaking between 4-8 hours after injection. Intermediate-acting insulin fades around 12–24 hours following injection. If taken at breakfast, it can cover your blood sugar requirements over lunch. However, this approach may prove unpredictable and unreliable, especially if lunch is delayed and blood sug Continue reading >>

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  1. Stump86

    Basal/Bolus Therapy

    Basal/Bolus Therapy
    (Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) & Pumping)
    What is Basal/Bolus Therapy?:
    Basal/Bolus Therapy is the attempt by insulin users to mimic a healthy pancreas by delivering insulin constantly as a basal and as needed as a bolus.
    A basal is insulin administered constantly to keep the blood glucose (BG) from fluctuating due to the normal release of glucose from the liver. The liver releases glucose and fats constantly to keep you alive in between meals. Without a constant release of insulin, BG would increase over time, so a basal insulin is given to combat this.
    On MDI a basal insulin is used, which is a long lasting insulin. The two newest are Lantus and Levemir, favored for their long duration (near 24 hours in most people) and flat profiles. They are taken usually once or twice a day and act to mimic basal insulin secretion of a healthy pancreas. As a result, a basal insulin is said to be at the correct dosage when it acts only to counter the constant release of glucose into the bloodstream.
    Basal testing is the method by which insulin users test their basal to ensure it is acting as it should. By skipping activities that would alter their BG (eating, exercise, bolus insulin) users are able to monitor BG fluctuations based on basal insulin action only and determine whether or not their basal insulin is properly set.
    Bolus insulin mimics the burst secretions of the pancreas in response to increases in blood glucose. Bolus insulin is often broken up into meal and correction boluses.
    Meal Boluses are boluses given to reduce BG upon the intake of carbs. Carbs are digested into simple sugars which pass readily into the bloodstream. A healthy pancreas is capable of detecting minute changes in BG and releasing insulin based on the amount of glucose in the blood. Insulin users must determine their meal bolus based on the amount of carbs they eat in a practice known as carb counting which is often tempered by the amount of fats and proteins eaten as well. Insulin is then taken in hopes of matching what a normal pancreas would secrete under the same circumstance and in an attempt of normalizing BG, usually within a few hours.
    Correction Boluses are any boluses taken to bring BG back to normal from a higher number. There are many reasons why a correction bolus would be given, but the purpose is always to return to normal numbers. A healthy pancreas is sensitive enough to change its insulin secretion on a constant basis, and non-diabetics do not typically experience highs. So correction boluses are unique to insulin users.
    Pump Use
    Pump users also practice basal/bolus therapy, through the use of an insulin pump which even more closely mimics a pancreas as it is capable of administering insulin in very small amounts and at a constant rate. Pump users are also capable of changing their basal insulin at will, something which MDI users cannot do, and often have an easier time responding to glycemic excursions than MDI users do.
    Because each insulin has a specific purpose, basal bolus therapy is very dynamic, allowing practitioners to eat a variety of foods and still experience good BG control. Basal/Bolus Therapy is often more difficult than other insulin regimens because occasional basal testing and carb counting are vital to success, and exercise can be tricky to deal with, but it is by far the most flexible method currently available.

  2. Lloyd

    Very well done, as always!
    -Lloyd

  3. SugarfreeB

    Nicely done.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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***PLEASE NOTE : THERE IS NO COMMENTARY*** This video outlines the procedure for delivering a food bolus. This video does not replace the advice of your Diabetes Educator.

V-go™—a Novel Device For Delivering Basal–bolus Insulin Therapy To Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Results from large randomized, prospective trials indicate that attaining and maintaining near-normal levels of glycemia reduces the risk of long-term complications in diabetes.1–3 Nevertheless, the number of patients achieving the glycemic goals outlined in these landmark studies remains inadequate. In the US, fewer than half of adults with diabetes attain glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels less than 7%.4,5 Despite the administration of oral antidiabetic medications, often in escalating doses or in combination, declining β-cell function leads to increasing blood glucose levels over time in patients with type 2 diabetes.6 Most patients with type 2 diabetes eventually require insulin therapy.7 Indeed, the great majority of the more than five million Americans who take insulin injections every day are patients with type 2 diabetes.9 A variety of insulin regimens, including long-acting and rapid-acting insulin analogs, have been studied and are efficacious in type 2 diabetes.8 The use of long-acting and rapid-acting insulin analogs in combination now allows patients to administer insulin in a manner that more closely mimicks physiological patterns of insulin secretion. A typical ba Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Stump86

    Basal/Bolus Therapy

    Basal/Bolus Therapy
    (Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) & Pumping)
    What is Basal/Bolus Therapy?:
    Basal/Bolus Therapy is the attempt by insulin users to mimic a healthy pancreas by delivering insulin constantly as a basal and as needed as a bolus.
    A basal is insulin administered constantly to keep the blood glucose (BG) from fluctuating due to the normal release of glucose from the liver. The liver releases glucose and fats constantly to keep you alive in between meals. Without a constant release of insulin, BG would increase over time, so a basal insulin is given to combat this.
    On MDI a basal insulin is used, which is a long lasting insulin. The two newest are Lantus and Levemir, favored for their long duration (near 24 hours in most people) and flat profiles. They are taken usually once or twice a day and act to mimic basal insulin secretion of a healthy pancreas. As a result, a basal insulin is said to be at the correct dosage when it acts only to counter the constant release of glucose into the bloodstream.
    Basal testing is the method by which insulin users test their basal to ensure it is acting as it should. By skipping activities that would alter their BG (eating, exercise, bolus insulin) users are able to monitor BG fluctuations based on basal insulin action only and determine whether or not their basal insulin is properly set.
    Bolus insulin mimics the burst secretions of the pancreas in response to increases in blood glucose. Bolus insulin is often broken up into meal and correction boluses.
    Meal Boluses are boluses given to reduce BG upon the intake of carbs. Carbs are digested into simple sugars which pass readily into the bloodstream. A healthy pancreas is capable of detecting minute changes in BG and releasing insulin based on the amount of glucose in the blood. Insulin users must determine their meal bolus based on the amount of carbs they eat in a practice known as carb counting which is often tempered by the amount of fats and proteins eaten as well. Insulin is then taken in hopes of matching what a normal pancreas would secrete under the same circumstance and in an attempt of normalizing BG, usually within a few hours.
    Correction Boluses are any boluses taken to bring BG back to normal from a higher number. There are many reasons why a correction bolus would be given, but the purpose is always to return to normal numbers. A healthy pancreas is sensitive enough to change its insulin secretion on a constant basis, and non-diabetics do not typically experience highs. So correction boluses are unique to insulin users.
    Pump Use
    Pump users also practice basal/bolus therapy, through the use of an insulin pump which even more closely mimics a pancreas as it is capable of administering insulin in very small amounts and at a constant rate. Pump users are also capable of changing their basal insulin at will, something which MDI users cannot do, and often have an easier time responding to glycemic excursions than MDI users do.
    Because each insulin has a specific purpose, basal bolus therapy is very dynamic, allowing practitioners to eat a variety of foods and still experience good BG control. Basal/Bolus Therapy is often more difficult than other insulin regimens because occasional basal testing and carb counting are vital to success, and exercise can be tricky to deal with, but it is by far the most flexible method currently available.

  2. Lloyd

    Very well done, as always!
    -Lloyd

  3. SugarfreeB

    Nicely done.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

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Brief-novo' Xultophy Reported As Better Option Than Basal-bolus Insulin Therapy To Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Dec 5 (Reuters) - NOVO NORDISK A/S: * XULTOPHY REPORTED A BETTER OPTION THAN BASAL-BOLUS INSULIN THERAPY TO MANAGE TYPE 2 DIABETES BY PARTICIPANTS IN THE DUAL VII CLINICAL TRIAL * THIS WAS REPORTED BY PEOPLE WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES WHOSE BLOOD SUGAR WAS NOT CONTROLLED ON INSULIN GLARGINE U100 WITH METFORMIN, AND WHO COMPLETED QUALITY-OF-LIFE QUESTIONNAIRES AS PART OF THE DUAL VII CLINICAL TRIAL * MORE PEOPLE PREFERRED TO STAY ON XULTOPHY COMPARED WITH BASAL-BOLUS THERAPY (84.5 PCT VERSUS 68.1 PCT) * RESULTS WERE PRESENTED AT THE 2017 INTERNATIONAL DIABETES FEDERATION CONGRESS IN ABU DHABI, UAE. SOURCE TEXT FOR EIKON: FURTHER COMPANY COVERAGE: (Copenhagen newsroom) Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Stump86

    Basal/Bolus Therapy

    Basal/Bolus Therapy
    (Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) & Pumping)
    What is Basal/Bolus Therapy?:
    Basal/Bolus Therapy is the attempt by insulin users to mimic a healthy pancreas by delivering insulin constantly as a basal and as needed as a bolus.
    A basal is insulin administered constantly to keep the blood glucose (BG) from fluctuating due to the normal release of glucose from the liver. The liver releases glucose and fats constantly to keep you alive in between meals. Without a constant release of insulin, BG would increase over time, so a basal insulin is given to combat this.
    On MDI a basal insulin is used, which is a long lasting insulin. The two newest are Lantus and Levemir, favored for their long duration (near 24 hours in most people) and flat profiles. They are taken usually once or twice a day and act to mimic basal insulin secretion of a healthy pancreas. As a result, a basal insulin is said to be at the correct dosage when it acts only to counter the constant release of glucose into the bloodstream.
    Basal testing is the method by which insulin users test their basal to ensure it is acting as it should. By skipping activities that would alter their BG (eating, exercise, bolus insulin) users are able to monitor BG fluctuations based on basal insulin action only and determine whether or not their basal insulin is properly set.
    Bolus insulin mimics the burst secretions of the pancreas in response to increases in blood glucose. Bolus insulin is often broken up into meal and correction boluses.
    Meal Boluses are boluses given to reduce BG upon the intake of carbs. Carbs are digested into simple sugars which pass readily into the bloodstream. A healthy pancreas is capable of detecting minute changes in BG and releasing insulin based on the amount of glucose in the blood. Insulin users must determine their meal bolus based on the amount of carbs they eat in a practice known as carb counting which is often tempered by the amount of fats and proteins eaten as well. Insulin is then taken in hopes of matching what a normal pancreas would secrete under the same circumstance and in an attempt of normalizing BG, usually within a few hours.
    Correction Boluses are any boluses taken to bring BG back to normal from a higher number. There are many reasons why a correction bolus would be given, but the purpose is always to return to normal numbers. A healthy pancreas is sensitive enough to change its insulin secretion on a constant basis, and non-diabetics do not typically experience highs. So correction boluses are unique to insulin users.
    Pump Use
    Pump users also practice basal/bolus therapy, through the use of an insulin pump which even more closely mimics a pancreas as it is capable of administering insulin in very small amounts and at a constant rate. Pump users are also capable of changing their basal insulin at will, something which MDI users cannot do, and often have an easier time responding to glycemic excursions than MDI users do.
    Because each insulin has a specific purpose, basal bolus therapy is very dynamic, allowing practitioners to eat a variety of foods and still experience good BG control. Basal/Bolus Therapy is often more difficult than other insulin regimens because occasional basal testing and carb counting are vital to success, and exercise can be tricky to deal with, but it is by far the most flexible method currently available.

  2. Lloyd

    Very well done, as always!
    -Lloyd

  3. SugarfreeB

    Nicely done.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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