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Bad Humalog

Insulin Lispro - Injection, Humalog

Insulin Lispro - Injection, Humalog

The display and use of drug information on this site is subject to express terms of use. By continuing to view the drug information, you agree to abide by such terms of use. insulin lispro - injection, Humalog GENERIC NAME: INSULIN LISPRO - INJECTION (IN-su-lin LIS-proe) USES: Insulin lispro is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke.Insulin lispro is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. Insulin lispro starts working faster and lasts for a shorter time than regular insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. Insulin lispro may also be used with other oral diabetes medications (such as sulfonylureas like glyburide or glipizide). Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication HOW TO USE: Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist.Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package.Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin lispro should be clear and colorless.Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the s Continue reading >>

Bad Insulin Vial | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Bad Insulin Vial | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community ChrisMaleType1 Type 1 Well-Known Member I'll try to keep this short. I've just made the conclusion that I was using a bad insulin vial which I realize is very unusual. I am using novorapid and had unexplained high blood sugar levels for a few days. Firstly I put it down to stress, then I changed my cannula, then the reservoir itself. I then decided to increase my overall basal rates by 25% and I was still getting high blood sugar. By this stage, I was getting really stressed out which can't have helped matters. Finally, in desperation really, I started using a new insulin vial (same batch I think) and my blood sugar levels became much more normal. I've been a diabetic for six years and been on a pump for about six months. I've had maybe two longish periods that were similar to this one where my blood sugar levels were difficult to control and I'm wondering whether bad insulin could have explained those times as well. In future, when I start to notice a pattern of high blood sugar levels, I think I will definitely consider bad insulin as a possibility. For the record, the insulin was having an effect but was not nearly as effective as it should have been. I to am using Nova Rapid as a basal bolus injection. Ever so often I get unexplained high blood sugars which last for 2 to 3 days. I to feel that occasionally I get a bad vial of insulin but no one seems to take what I say serious. I don't know how my insulin has been kept before I have received it. ive noticed the delivery vans that deliver to the pharmacy a have no fridge compartments to keep the insulin cold during transit on hot summer days. I know you can get temperatures in excess of 100 degrees Continue reading >>

Beware Summer Extremes With Insulin

Beware Summer Extremes With Insulin

Living with diabetes blog With summer arriving in Minnesota and many other places, I'd like to talk about how to manage insulin storage in extreme temperatures such as this season brings. A number of years ago, I met with a client who used a rapid insulin pen for meal dosing. She shared with me a story of how she attended the county fair on an exceptionally hot day, and had placed her insulin pen in the back pocket of tight jeans and walked around the fairgrounds all day. She used the pen for covering meals eaten at the fair, and her blood sugars were running higher than normal, but she related this to all the junk food. The next day her blood sugars continued to run high and when she took her (rapid) insulin, it didn't seem to affect her blood sugar level at all; in fact, it was like she was taking water instead of insulin. She wondered if the heat had affected her insulin, so she switched to a new insulin (disposable) pen, and soon after her blood sugars started to drop. Has this or something similar happened to you? I looked at insulin manufacturers' websites and found that for the majority of all types and brands of insulin, the maximum temperatures recommended are as follows: Opened room temperature insulin should not exceed 86 F (30 C) with the exception of Lantus, which should not exceed 77 F (25 C). Most manufacturers of insulin recommend discarding insulin if it exceeds 98.6 F (37 C). Other non insulin diabetic injectable medications: Glucagon and Byetta should not exceed 77 F (25 C). Symlin should not exceed 86 F (30 C). Avoiding potential problems Temperatures exceeding manufacturer's recommendations for insulin/medications Store your insulin in the refrigerator, in an insulated case or cooler with a freezable gel pack, or use a cooling wallet. Cooling wallet Continue reading >>

Humalog Side Effects

Humalog Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin lispro (IN soo lin LISS pro) Brand Names: HumaLOG, HumaLOG Cartridge, HumaLOG KwikPen, HumaLOG KwikPen (Concentrated) What is Humalog? Humalog (insulin lispro) is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Humalog is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Humalog is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Humalog is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 3 years old. Important information Humalog is a fast-acting insulin that begins to work very quickly. If you use this medication with meal, use it within 15 minutes before or just after you eat. Never share an injection pen, cartridge, or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. You should not use Humalog if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog is only part of a complete program of treatment that may also include diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, dental care, and testing your blood sugar. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely. Changing any of these factors can affect your blood sugar levels. Before taking this medicine You should not use Humalog if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Humalog should not be given to a child younger than 3 years old. Humalog should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure Humalog is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; or low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia). Tell your doctor if Continue reading >>

Humalog Side Effects

Humalog Side Effects

Humalog may cause adverse side effects. Tell your doctor if the following symptoms appear: redness, swelling, or itching in the place where you injected Humalog changes in the feel of your skin such as skin thickening or a little indentation in the skin swelling of the hands and feet weight gain constipation Some adverse side effects can be quite serious: rash and itching difficulty breathing hives wheezing fast heartbeat sweating weakness muscle cramps abnormal heartbeat pharyngitis rhinitis accidental injury asthenia bronchitis dysmenorrhea myalgia Continue reading >>

Bad Insulin - Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Bad Insulin - Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. How do you know if insulin is bad when you are not certain either degree limit was met? LocationSomewhare in the South Pacific??? Hi, Would you know if it was warm or had too much sunlight or any abnormal discoloration in the liquid?. When it's bad, it just doesn't work. In my experience with bad insulin (has only happened 3 or 4 times) it happens very quickly, going from good insulin to water in about a day. I've learned to keep my vials in the refrigerator at all times, taking only the pre-filled syringes with me when I leave the house. That way it lasts until I've used it all, much longer than 28 days. If you suspect a bottle of insulin, just open a new one and see if it makes a difference. I can't sa I've ever experienced one. I use them up too quickly. I've only had it happen with Humalog twice, never with Lantus, and both times my blood sugar went up and then just kept going higher no matter how much I corrected. The first time the insulin seemed to somehow lose potency slowly, but the second time it worked one minute and didn't work the next (and I also reacted a lot faster at switching to a new vial, having had it happen once already). I actually still have my records from both times showing how my blood sugars went: May 2005 (the first time it went bad slowly, possibly from using it for too long): 05/28 (here's the day I think it started to go bad at some point) N: 19.4 (349) - changed to new vial of Humalog and corrected August 2006 (went bad really suddenly, possibly from overheating): L: 20.0 (360) - switched to new vial of Humalog and corrected Depends on the type on insulin. I h Continue reading >>

Why Humalog® U-100?

Why Humalog® U-100?

You may have been taking a long-acting insulin for a while now. So why did your doctor prescribe another insulin? Well, it’s to help control the blood sugar spikes that happen naturally when you eat. Everyone gets them, but when you have diabetes you may need extra help controlling them. That’s where Humalog comes in. Humalog is different than your long-acting insulin. Long-acting insulin helps control your blood sugar throughout the whole day. Humalog is fast-acting insulin—it helps control the blood sugar spikes that happen naturally when you eat. Humalog is available in the Humalog U-100 KwikPen, which is portable and easy to use. And, since it shouldn’t be refrigerated after the first use, you can take it just about anywhere. Continue reading >>

Bad Insulin: When To Toss The Vial

Bad Insulin: When To Toss The Vial

Recently, the question was asked: "Does anyone have any tricks for knowing when it’s time to toss a vial of insulin?" The writer was concerned about whether a vial contains bad insulin - that is, insulin that has a diminished ability to decrease blood sugar levels compared to what was expected. There are lots of discussions on the Internet about how to identify bad insulin, so I’ll focus on what to do with the insulin and the vial when bad insulin is suspected. I’d like to point out that there are two different categories of what to do with bad insulin: First, contacting the manufacturer or your pharmacy about returning suspected bad insulin, and second, deciding to discard a vial of partially-used insulin. _Contacting the manufacturer or pharmacy: _ For many insulin products, the liquid that contains insulin should be clear and colorless. Therefore, if you open a box of this kind of insulin, and find that the liquid in the vial is discolored, or that the liquid has particles floating in it, there’s something wrong. In such a case, the insulin should not be used, and the manufacturer should be notified. They will want to take back the vial and test it, and they will arrange for you to get a replacement vial. For example, one label states "Only use XXX that is clear and colorless. If your XXX is cloudy or slightly colored, return it to your pharmacy for a replacement." If you are using a type of insulin that is naturally cloudy (such as NPH), you might find small white clumps that sank to the bottom of the bottle, or a white coating or “frosting” on the inside wall of the glass vial. Again, the insulin should not be used, and arrangements made to return the vial for replacement. There’s another circumstance about bad insulin that might occur, and doesn’t Continue reading >>

Bad Lot Of Humalog?

Bad Lot Of Humalog?

I returned a box of Humalog to the pharmacist today. As soon as I started using it, I would bolus for meals, and my BG would keep going higher, and then BAM! severe lows, usually around midnight. Last Thursday I was high from after lunch, all evening, and was at 10.9 at 9:12pm. Two hours later, at 11:21, I was 1.6. I have been going up and down like a yoyo. After much frustration and giving it some thought, I think that lot of Humalog isn't fast-acting, and any corrections I have made were hitting me about four hours later, with a cumulative effect. The pharmacist was good about it, and took my box and will be reporting the lot to Health Canada, I still have a couple of vials from a previous lot to use in the meantime. There is a chance I am going wonky, and it's not the Humalog, but the yoyo effect started exactly with the new lot of Humalog, and I have had good control up until that. A1C at DX 13.7 June 2016 9.3, Sept 2016 8.6, Dec 2016 8.3, March 2017 6.3, June 2017 5.3, Oct 2017 5.6 Jan 2018 5.8 D.D. Family Type-3c/1b, Dx 79 On MDI, CKD-3, SA From your description of what happened to your BGs, sounds maybe like R regular insulin, to me? I have had a vial of insulin go bad, loose its effects, but because of a storage temp (too cold or hot) issue or too old, Lantus past 28 days, by more than a couple days. Let us know how your OLD Humalog is working for you. type-3c (Pancreatitis) on MDI, CKD-3, RRMS, Multiple Sclerosis w/bilateral stage-3 Meniere's mimic, Psoriasis, Thyroid, AFIB, Rheumatic Fever Heart disease, More than 10 long standing Dawson's Fingers (MS pot-holes) in brain, spinal lesions, spinal stenosis and carpel tunnel. D.D. Family T1 since 1966, pumper since '03, transplant '08 It sounds the way I used to react to Novorapid. I found a very different action Continue reading >>

Humalog Side Effects Center

Humalog Side Effects Center

Humalog (insulin lispro [rDNA origin]) Injection is a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults. Humalog is usually given together with another long-acting insulin. Humalog is also used together with oral medications to treat type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes in adults. Common side effects of Humalog include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation). Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), is the most common side effect of insulin lispro such as Humalog. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusions, or seizure (convulsions). Low blood potassium levels (hypokalemia). Symptoms include dry mouth, increased thirst, increased urination, uneven heartbeats, muscle pain or weakness, leg pain or discomfort, or confusion The total daily insulin requirement varies and the dose is usually between 0.5 to 1 unit/kg/day. Insulin needs may be altered during stress, major illness, or changes in exercise, meal patterns, or co-administered drugs. Humalog may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin lispro on lowering blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Humalog. Discuss a plan for managing blood sugars with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin used during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Humalog (insulin lispro, USP [rDNA origin]) Inj Continue reading >>

Can Humalog Handle The Heat?

Can Humalog Handle The Heat?

See also: Kinetic vs Dynamics and User's Reports Humalog is a terrific insulin that improves postmeal readings, reduces the frequency of lows, and generally makes people feel better. But reports from people on both pumps and injections have surfaced indicating that Humalog has trouble handling the heat. These reports began to appear just after Humalog was released. Most insulins are relatively stable in hot weather, and lose potency only with unusually high temperatures (i.e., a non-refrigerated delivery truck with a flat tire in Phoenix in August). However, Humalog has gained a reputation for wanting to stay in your refrigerator, raising concerns about how your insulin is handled in transit to your pharmacy or home. Users report random, unexpected high blood sugars that correct when a new bottle of Humalog is started. Inspection of the bad bottle reveals either 1) several very tiny particles, much smaller than those typically found in a bad bottle of Regular, 2) one or two large hazy particles, or 3) small particles attached to the insides of the bottle. Healthy Humalog will appear as pure as clear water, with no particles or haze. Insulin pumps may be especially prone to unexpected highs because they use only Humalog. Heat-related problems typically start after three to four days use in a pump, or, when a bad bottle is encountered, immediately after first use of that bottle. On injections, the problem typically shows up as unexpected high readings after meals. Research studies undertaken so far have indicated no problem with use of Humalog in pumps. Prior to Humalog's release, Lilly conducted extensive heat and stability testing, and believed that it was as stable as Regular insulin which has an excellent history. But in the larger lab of the world, a loss of activit Continue reading >>

How To Identify Bad Insulin

How To Identify Bad Insulin

Over the past few years, I’ve had a great deal of practice at identifying bad insulin, unfortunately. So much practice that I’m about to give up on Apidra entirely. When it works, it’s great. It’s turned my Dexcom shots from Charlie Brown’s tee shirt to gently rolling hills. BUT I’ve gotten bad batches from at least 3 different pharmacies. So either the local distributor is bad, or the insulin itself is so flaky they can’t control the strength. Add to that, it’s off formulary for my new insurance, so my copay is five times what it used to be, for something that more and more frequently just isn’t doing its job. In a perfect world (scratch that, in a perfect world I wouldn't need insulin)...In a reasonable world, there would be a test to check your insulin. It doesn’t have to be a perfect test (hmm, this bottle scored a 93 and my last was a 96). I would settle for something from the insulin Dark Ages, involving tablets, fizzing, urine (even someone else’s urine!) and ambiguous color changes: Now it says chartreuse is good, but this is more of a celadon... Anyway, I’ve unfortunately had to come up with my own checklist, because we’re all conditioned to assume it’s our bodies, not our insulin, that is the problem. See “litany of blame” in this post. Here it is: Clue #1 - unexplained spikes from “safe” meals - I eat the same breakfast every day. It usually does the same thing (if by usually you mean about 70% of the time): I gradually climb 100 points or so, hover 15 minutes, then drop like a rock around 10am, which I stave off with a single Dove Dark (hey, whatever works, right?). Final result, nice and level in the 80s just before lunch. So when my typical breakfast launches up like the space shuttle, peaks around 300, then drops like t Continue reading >>

Tracking Insulin's Health In The Summer Heat

Tracking Insulin's Health In The Summer Heat

Sunscreen: check. Water bottle: check. Beach ball: check. Insulin cooler....? Yep. For those of us who use insulin, summer heat creates an extra level of complexity and worry. The real question we all ask ourselves in the heat of the summer is whether our fun-in-the-sun will cook our insulin and leave us having-not-so-much-fun in an air conditioned ICU unit? There's a whole industry of solutions dedicated to helping us keep our insulin cool, ranging from cooling packs such as the ReliOn and others, to portable fridges, to high tech cooling crystals. Hell, we're even running a Giveaway contest this week in which our readers can win some of these products! With much of the U.S. suffering under a stifling drought-baked summer, the question of just how hot insulin can get is on all our minds. But you have to wonder if these products are serving an important need or just preying on our fears. To find out, we asked the manufacturers themselves, some leading insulin experts, and the American Diabetes Association — and guess what? The answer isn't as clear as you might like. Not Your Grandma's Insulin First, a bit of history: Didn't grandma keep her insulin in the fridge all the time? Well, only if she read the label. The original pork and beef insulin formulations were supposed to be kept cold all the time. As cold insulin stings like hell to inject, the move to being able to keep the newer human insulin and later analogs at room temperature was a great victory (!) for those of us who are human pin cushions. But wait a minute... whose room temperature are we talking about? My father used to get annoyed with me when I'd shovel ice cubes into my glass of red wine. "Wine is supposed to be consumed at room temperature," he'd huff. "Yeah, in the frickin' French Alps,where room te Continue reading >>

Welcome To The Humalog® Family Of Insulins.

Welcome To The Humalog® Family Of Insulins.

Humalog® is used to treat people with diabetes for the control of blood sugar. Humalog® Mix75/25™(75% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 25% insulin lispro injection) and Humalog® Mix50/50™(50% insulin lispro protamine suspension and 50% insulin lispro injection) are used to treat adults with diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. Do not share your Humalog, Humalog Junior, Humalog Mix75/25, or Humalog Mix50/50 KwikPens, cartridges, reusable pen compatible with Lilly 3 mL cartridges, or syringes with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection or get a serious infection from them. The Humalog contained in the Humalog U-200 KwikPen should ONLY be injected with the Humalog U-200 KwikPen. Do NOT withdraw Humalog U-200 from the pen using a syringe. It could result in an overdose causing severe low blood sugar which may put your life in danger. Do not change the insulin you use without talking to your healthcare provider. Changes may make you more likely to experience low or high blood sugar. Changes should be made cautiously under the supervision of your healthcare provider. When used in a pump, do not mix or dilute Humalog U-100 with any other insulin or liquid. Do NOT use Humalog U-200, Humalog Mix75/25 or Humalog Mix50/50 in a pump. These insulins start working faster than other insulins that contain regular human insulin. You should take Humalog within fifteen minutes before eating or right after eating a meal. You should take Humalog Mix75/25 and Humalog Mix50/50 within fifteen minutes before eating. Do not use Humalog Mix75/25 or Humalog Mix50/50 if they have solid particles or clumps in them. Humalog Mix75/25 and Humalog Mix50/50 should be mixed carefully before each use and should be cloudy or mi Continue reading >>

Bad News For Diabetics: Eli Lilly Abandons French Ultra-rapid Insulin

Bad News For Diabetics: Eli Lilly Abandons French Ultra-rapid Insulin

Bad News for Diabetics: Eli Lilly Abandons French Ultra-Rapid Insulin Eli Lilly has decided to terminate its partnership with Adocia for the development of BioChaperone Lispro, an ultra-rapid insulin for diabetes. Despite results from 6 clinical studies indicating that Adocias ultra-rapid insulin performs better than Eli Lillys Humalog, the big American pharma has decided to terminate its collaboration with the French biotech.As part of this licensing partnership, Eli Lilly had already paid over 56M ($60M) during development, but the rights will now get back to the biotech at no cost. Grard Soula, CEO of Adocia, has expressed his surprise and disappointment. We are convinced that BioChaperone Lispro can improve the lives of people with diabetes and Adociawill continueto prepare launch of Phase III clinical trialswhile looking for a new partner. The product in question uses Adocias Biochaperone technology,which forms a complex with the desired drug to protect it from degradation and enhance its performance. In the case of insulin, this technology makes absorption faster, which improves the level of control patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have over their blood sugar. Rather than due to poor performance, it looks like Eli Lillys decision is based on the failure of its Alzheimers drug solanezumab in Phase III. The company has already eliminated around 485 jobs across the US due to the trial results. In addition, despite the superiority of Adocias BioChaperone Lispro over Humalog, the big pharma would have faced tough competition in the insulin market. Sanofis Lantus and Novo Nordisks NovoRapid are both in the top 10 best-selling biologicals , whereas Humalog sales have proved lower than expected .Instead of bidding for a riskier, more innovative product, Lill Continue reading >>

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