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Artificial Sweeteners And Insulin

Non-nutritive Sweeteners Can Increase Insulin Resistance In Those Who Are Obese

Non-nutritive Sweeteners Can Increase Insulin Resistance In Those Who Are Obese

Sucralose may adversely affect glucose metabolism. Even though Splenda has zero calories, it can play havoc with your blood sugars. Published in the journal Diabetes Care, researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that sucralose, most popularly known by the brand name Splenda, has effects on the body’s responses to sugar (glucose) — which could thereby impact diabetes risk. “There seem to be differential effects of sucralose on glucose metabolism in normal-weight people and in people with obesity, so previous findings in lean subjects cannot be extrapolated to what will be the effects of sucralose in subjects with obesity (and vice versa),” said Marta Yanina Pepino De Gruev, PhD, assistant professor in food science and human nutrition at the University of Illinois in Urbana. “Clinicians may find surprising that sucralose is not metabolically inert, as generally thought, at least for people with obesity.” The new study included 17 people who were severely obese (They had a body mass index over 42. A BMI of 30 is considered the starting point for obesity) and didn’t regularly consume artificially sweetened products. The study participants drank sucralose or water before taking a glucose challenge test. This test involves drinking a sugary solution before undergoing blood sugar measurements in order to see how well the body responds to sugar; it’s typically used as a tool to determine if a woman has gestational diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. After that, the researchers asked all the study participants who first drank water to then drink sucralose before undergoing another glucose challenge test, and all those who first drank sucralose to then drink water before undergoing another glucose challenge test. Resear Continue reading >>

Hardcore Nutrition: Are Artificial Sweeteners Killing Your Shred?

Hardcore Nutrition: Are Artificial Sweeteners Killing Your Shred?

Hardcore Nutrition: Are Artificial Sweeteners Killing Your Shred? Its all in how you interpret the research. There are no absolutes when were talking about how the substanceswe ingest affect our bodies. No matter what we claimor what studiesclaimwell always be proven wrong by examples to the contrary. A perfectexample of this is the ongoing debate regarding artificial sweeteners and theireffect on fat loss and muscle gain. How does this apply to you as a bodybuilder? Well, if youre restricting carbs ,you obviously cant consume sugar on a regular basis. As Ive said repeatedly,however, if youre liberally consuming diet drinks and having trouble makingprogress on an ultra-low-carb diet, the sweeteners in the drinks may be thereason for your stall out. Im telling you about this because of a research article published a few monthsback thats still resounding in bodybuilding nutrition circles. This particularstudy showed an increased insulin response as a consequence of pre-ingestingsucralose, the artificial sweetener in Splenda, followed by a bolus ingestion ofreal sugar. What this really demonstrated was that just the oral stimulation of sweetnessby way of the sucralosecaused an increase in the release of insulin, andpoor blood sugar control. This, unfortunately, has been interpreted as irrefutableproof that non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) make us fat. The problem with thisstudy, however, is lessabout the effects ofsucralose than it is aboutthe spread of information.What nobody mentions inall this furor is the fact thatthe subjects of this studywere all grossly obese, withbody mass indexes over40a statistic that becomesmore accurate at predictingbody fat composition as thenumber gets higher. You cantassess this study withoutfocusing on the people studied,and how obese bodies Continue reading >>

Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause An Insulin Spike?

Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause An Insulin Spike?

178 Comments The notion that artificial sweeteners (and sweet tastes in general) might produce an insulin response is one of those murky memes that winds itself around the blogs, but it’s never stated one way or the other with any sort of confidence. I briefly mentioned the possibility of non-caloric sweeteners influencing satiety hormones in last week’s diet soda post, and a number of you guys mentioned the same thing. Still, I’ve never seen unequivocal evidence that this is the case. This whole idea first came to my attention some time ago when my dog Buddha got into a bottle of “alternative sleep assists” which contained, among other things, 5 HTP (version of l-tryptophan) and xylitol (sugar alcohol). Long story short, dogs can’t take xylitol because it causes a spike in insulin, which then severely depletes blood glucose. Buddha got past this with a trip to the vet’s at 10:30 Sunday night (thanks, Dr. Dean). But it occurred to me that the same effect might be seen in humans, which is why I pose the question today… Do artificial sweeteners induce insulin secretion (perhaps via cephalic phase insulin release, which is sort of the body’s preemptive strike against foods that will require insulin to deal with)? One of the reasons a definitive answer is rarely given is that the question is improperly framed. Artificial sweeteners is not a monolithic entity. There are multiple types of sweeteners, all of them chemically distinct from each other. A more useful question would be “What effect does [specific artificial sweetener goes here] have on insulin?” So let’s go around the circle and ask. Does aspartame (aka Equal and Nutrasweet) affect insulin? Aspartame is pretty gross stuff, what with its awful taste and hordes of people who get terrible react Continue reading >>

Ask The Doctor: Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Insulin Resistance?

Ask The Doctor: Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Insulin Resistance?

Ask the doctor Q. I've heard that artificial sweeteners increase the risk of developing insulin resistance. Is that true? Are some types worse than others? A. You've asked a question scientists are still working to answer. Studies of artificial sweeteners are mixed, with some indicating that people using them eat fewer calories and lose weight or maintain a stable weight. However, in a few studies, artificial sweeteners were associated with weight gain, which might increase the risk of developing insulin resistance—a condition in which body cells do not respond properly to insulin and thus cannot easily absorb glucose from the blood-stream. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Are Artificial Sweeteners Bad For Me?

Are Artificial Sweeteners Bad For Me?

When we reach for ‘diet’ or ‘low sugar’ products, we think that we’re choosing the healthy option: eating a lot of sugar can make our blood sugar levels high and put us at risk of Type 2 diabetes. But do artificial sweeteners actually help, or could they be doing us harm? We teamed up with Dr James Brown at Aston University to find out. Sweeteners such as saccharin, sucralose, aspartame and stevia are found in most low-sugar or ‘diet’ products, as well as many ‘normal sugar’ foods and drinks, so many of us are eating them without knowing it. In 2014, a small study had shown that artificial sweeteners had disrupted the gut bacteria of mice, and when they tested saccharin on 7 people they found that it did the same to 4 of them, as well as making their blood sugar levels less healthy. Many studies have also shown that people who take more artificial sweeteners tend to have a higher BMI and waist circumference, although it has never been shown that the sweeteners are actually causing them to put on weight. So we wanted to do our own test, to confirm the findings in saccharin, but also test another, newer sweeteners, said to be more ‘natural’ as it is derived from a plant: Stevia. We recruited 15 volunteers, who did not normally consume artificial sweeteners. They all had their blood sugar levels measured (having fasted for 12 hours), and then were split into two groups. One group were asked to take the daily safe level of saccharin, and the other group the daily safe level of stevia for 7 days. Each was also asked to give a stool sample, in order to analyse their gut bacteria. At the end of the week, we did the same tests, to see what effect the two different sweeteners had had. We found that the blood sugar levels of the volunteers taking stevia had Continue reading >>

Effect Of Artificial And Natural Sweeteners On Glucose And Insulin In Plasma Of Rats

Effect Of Artificial And Natural Sweeteners On Glucose And Insulin In Plasma Of Rats

Effect of artificial and natural sweeteners on glucose and insulin in plasma of rats Department of Dietetics, Faculty of Human Nutrition and Consumer Science, Warsaw University of Life Science, Poland The role of artificial sweeteners in body-weight regulation is still unclear. Replacing sugar with low-calorie sweeteners is a common strategy for facilitating weight control. Whether using artificial sweeteners may augment positive energy balance through increased food intake was investigated. The effects of sweet taste and its sources (carbohydrate and non-caloric sweeteners) on diet growth efficiency, fasting and postprandial glucose and insulin plasma concentrations were also compared. 140 male Sprague-Dawley rats (initial body mass: 325 19g) were randomly divided into 4 groups. Each group was provided with isoenergetic diets: 3 with the same sweet taste intensity (with sucralose SU, sucrose SC and maltodextrine M) and one diet non-sweet (NS). Food intake was recorded daily and body weight measured twice a week/controlled every two days. After 3 weeks, animals were euthanized as follows: fasting and 30, 60, 120, 180 min. after an appropriate meal (n=7 from each group/time point). The group receiving sucralose consumed more feed and had significantly increased body weight compared to the other groups. The diet growth efficiency in groups SU was statistically higher than in NS and SC groups, but did not differ from group M. In SU group, postprandial increases in glucose and insulin levels were significantly lower compared to both SC and M groups, but no different from group NS. Fasting HOMA insulin resistance index was not significantly different among the groups. The results indicate that the sweet taste of a diet derived from non-caloric sweeteners may increase food i Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Here's what you need to know to understand the impact of sweeteners—both nutritive and non-nutritive—on your blood sugar. Walk down the supermarket aisles and you’ll find a dizzying array of sweeteners. Everything from ordinary (white) table sugar to newly-formulated sugars, sugar substitutes and more. Some claim benefits for people with diabetes that promise to have no effect on blood sugar. But with so many choices—from ordinary table sugar (aka cane, sucrose), maple sugar and agave to newer arrivals like coconut sugar, monk sugar and stevia, to nonnutritive sweeteners (sucralose, aspartame, etc.)—how do you know which one is best for you and your blood sugar? It's important to know that use of the word natural is not a term regulated by the FDA, nor does it have a clear definition. These so-called “natural” sweeteners, also referred to as nutritive sweeteners, are a type of sugar (typically sucrose), which provide calories from carbohydrates. All nutritive sugars have about 14 calories per teaspoon and contain 5 grams of carbohydrates. Food companies seem to use the word “natural” as a marketing gimmick to give consumers a sense of additional health benefits. Popular nutritive sweetners include: brown sugar, honey, coconut sugar and agave syrup. But remember, sugar is sugar. Whether honey or table sugar, they all contain carbohydrates and will raise blood glucose levels. Having Sugar Knowledge is Important Contrary to popular belief, people with diabetes can consume sugar but it’s best when consumed in foods where it occurs naturally as it does in whole fruits. Understanding the type of sugar you consume and how much, is essential for successful diabetes management. People with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, don’t have the adequate insulin nee Continue reading >>

How Artificial Sweeteners Can Actually Pack On The Pounds

How Artificial Sweeteners Can Actually Pack On The Pounds

How Artificial Sweeteners Can Actually Pack on the Pounds How artificial sweeteners can actually pack on the pounds We read it in newspapers and see it on the nightly news; even Hollywood is responding with various spin-offs of the NBC hit reality show The Biggest Loser. Obesity rates in both adults and children are reaching epidemic proportions. While the incidence of obesity and overweight Americans have spiked over the years, so has the trend of consuming sugar-free foods. The number of Americans consuming sugar-free products increased from less than 70 million in 1987 to more than 160 million in 2000. Surprisingly, however, switching from sugar to an artificial, no-calorie sweetener may thwart your attempts to cut calories and actually cause your metabolism to slow down, and slow metabolism can be a major factor in weight gain. Do Artificial Sweeteners Really Cause Weight Gain? A recent study by Purdue University found that rats given yogurt sweetened with saccharin (an artificial sweetener) consumed more calories and gained more weight than rats fed yogurt sweetened with glucose (a natural variety of sugar). This led researchers to believe that foods with artificial sweeteners, such as saccharin and aspartame, lead to greater weight gain than the same foods sweetened with high-calorie sugar. Artificial sweeteners may weaken the bodys ability to identify the delivery of calories into the stomach. When you consume glucose, found in foods and drinks (such as regular soda pop), your taste buds send a message to the brain that says sugar is on its way down to the stomach. Your brain then prepares your stomach to take in the sugar, while your metabolism prepares the body for the incoming calories. When the sugar is replaced by a no-calorie, artificial sweetener, and the Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Artificial Sweetener On Insulin Secretion. 1. The Effect Ofacesulfame K On Insulin Secretion In The Rat (studies In Vivo).

The Effect Of Artificial Sweetener On Insulin Secretion. 1. The Effect Ofacesulfame K On Insulin Secretion In The Rat (studies In Vivo).

The effect of artificial sweetener on insulin secretion. 1. The effect ofacesulfame K on insulin secretion in the rat (studies in vivo). Liang Y, Steinbach G, Maier V, Pfeiffer EF. Acesulfame K is an artificial sweetener which has been used in the food industry for some years. As yet no metabolic effects have been reported. It was reportedthat the sweetener can induce a cephalic phase of insulin secretion. To analysethe mechanism of this phenomenon, we studied the effect of Acesulfame K oninsulin secretion in vivo. Male Wistar rats, weighing 250-300 g were fastedovernight and anaesthetized with phenobarbital. A silicon catheter was insertedinto the right cervical vein for injection of test substances and for obtainingblood samples. In some experiments, another catheter was inserted into the leftcervical vein for continuous infusion. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 min after injection, and at -10, 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 120min after the infusion started. Injection of Acesulfame K (150 mg/kg body weight)increased the plasma insulin concentration at 5 min from 27.3 +/- 3.0 microU/mlto 58.6 +/- 4.2 microU/ml without any significant change in the blood glucose.Infusion of Acesulfame K (20 mg/kg body weight/min) for one hour maintained theinsulin concentration at a high level (about 85-100 microU/ml) during thisperiod, and at the same time blood glucose was gradually reduced from 103.0 +/-7.3 to 72.0 +/- 7.2 mg/dl. When using different amounts of Acesulfame K, theinsulin secretion was stimulated in a dose-dependent fashion. The effect ofAcesulfame K on insulin secretion was similar to that observed by injecting orinfusing the same doses of glucose (150 mg/kg) body weight for injection and 20mg/kg body weight/min for infusion), except that no h Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners: Any Effect On Blood Sugar?

Artificial Sweeteners: Any Effect On Blood Sugar?

Can I use artificial sweeteners if I have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. You can use most sugar substitutes if you have diabetes, including: Saccharin (Sweet'N Low) Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal) Acesulfame potassium (Sunett) Sucralose (Splenda) Stevia (Pure Via, Truvia) Artificial sweeteners, also called sugar substitutes, offer the sweetness of sugar without the calories. Artificial sweeteners are many times sweeter than sugar, so it takes a smaller amount to sweeten foods. This is why foods made with artificial sweeteners may have fewer calories than those made with sugar. Sugar substitutes don't affect your blood sugar level. In fact, most artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods" — foods containing less than 20 calories and 5 grams or less of carbohydrates — because they don't count as calories or carbohydrates on a diabetes exchange. Remember, however, other ingredients in foods containing artificial sweeteners can still affect your blood sugar level. More research is needed, but studies are increasingly finding that the benefits of substituting sugar-sweetened food and beverages with those that have been sweetened artificially may not be as clear as once thought, particularly when consumed in large amounts. One reason may be a "rebound" effect, where some people end up consuming more of an unhealthy type of food because of the misperception that because it's sugar-free it's healthy. Also, be cautious with sugar alcohols — including mannitol, sorbitol and xylitol. Sugar alcohols can increase your blood sugar level. And for some people, sugar alcohols may cause diarrhea. Continue reading >>

Sugar Substitute - Wikipedia

Sugar Substitute - Wikipedia

"Sweetener" and "Sugarfree" redirect here. For the Filipino band, see Sugarfree (band) . For musical recording by Swami, see Sugarless . For other uses, see Sweetener (disambiguation) . Packets of Assugrin , a brand of cyclamate . A sugar substitute is a food additive that provides a sweet taste like that of sugar while containing significantly less food energy . Some sugar substitutes are produced by nature, and others produced synthetically. Those that are not produced by nature are, in general, called artificial sweeteners. In 2017, sucralose was the most common sugar substitute used in manufacturing of foods and beverages, having 30% of the global market projected to become $2.8 billion in collective value by 2021. [1] When sweeteners are provided for restaurant customers to add to beverages such as tea and coffee, they are often available in paper packets that can be torn and emptied. In North America, the colors are typically white for sucrose, blue for aspartame, pink for saccharin, [note 1] yellow for sucralose (United States) or cyclamate (Canada), tan for turbinado , orange for monk fruit extract , and green for stevia. [2] This section needs additional citations for verification . Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. ( Learn how and when to remove this template message ) A class of sugar substitutes is known as high-intensity sweeteners. These are compounds with many times the sweetness of sucrose , common table sugar. As a result, much less sweetener is required and energy contribution is often negligible. The sensation of sweetness caused by these compounds (the "sweetness profile") is sometimes notably different from sucrose, so they are often used in complex mixtures Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And Blood Sugar What You Need To Know

Artificial Sweeteners And Blood Sugar What You Need To Know

Artificial Sweeteners and Blood Sugar What you NEED to Know by Dr. Oler, ND | Oct 12, 2017 | Amino Acid Therapy , Areas of Weight Loss Resistance , Blood Sugar , insulin resistance , Neurotransmitter Imbalances | 0 comments In a previous post, we highlighted research that showed that those that consumed non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) experienced higher blood sugar levels and gained more weight than those that did not. This baffled researchers at the time, as NAS had been assumed to be helpful to those trying to lose weight and are often marketed to those with blood sugar imbalances, including diabetes. New research is uncovering why NAS have such detrimental effects. Nearly 40% of U.S. adults and 25% of children in the United States consume artificially sweetened beverages every day. Most consumers still believe that artificially sweetened beverages are healthier alternatives for weight management and blood sugar control than products that contain sugar. However, evidence is mounting that proves this belief false; in fact the data shows just the opposite. Data from seven randomized clinical trials found that consumption of artificially sweetened beverages did not help with weight reduction over 6 to 24 months. In addition, other research has shown that those that consume artificially sweetened beverages actually gain more weight than those that do not consume them. The question is Why?. Artificial Sweeteners Alter Blood Sugar Levels And Not in a Good Way A group of researchers from the University of Adelaide in Austrailia have made a breakthrough discovery about how NAS affect blood sugar levels in humans. In their study, they provided healthy adults with a NAS combination (92 mg of sucralose and 52 mg acesulfame-K per day) or a placebo for 2 weeks. This amoun Continue reading >>

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

Diet Soda And Insulin Spikes

Diet Soda And Insulin Spikes

I have heard that the main reason why diet drinks, like a diet soda, can be bad on a diet, is that it can spike insulin levels and then your body expects sugar that it does not get. I have taken to the habit of only occasionally having diet drinks with meals, so that any increase in insulin is actually met with food in my system. My question is whether or not this is a good/workable strategy, or whether a diet soda is a diet soda no matter when you drink it and is therefore always a bad idea. Thank you for your time. It doesn’t seem like there’s a short and sweet answer to your inquiry. Unfortunately, scientists still don’t fully understand the influence of artificial sweeteners on the body’s blood sugar and insulin responses. But, here’s the skinny on pairing a meal with your diet soda: the evidence that connects artificial sweeteners to “insulin spiking” is limited. In vitro studies (a.k.a., test-tube studies of cells living outside the body) have shown that cells release more insulin when exposed to some artificial sweeteners. Increased insulin signals a cell to store more energy as fat (rather than use it as fuel), so this might partially explain the correlation between weight gain and artificial sweeteners. However, much more research on this is still needed, so it’s difficult to say if eating a meal with your diet soda makes a difference either way. Reader, you also mention you’ve heard that drinking diet soda might make your body expect sugar when it’s really getting a calorie-free substitute. Although studies on humans show mixed results, researchers think that it could be a possibility because this is generally true in rats  — animals predict the calorie content of a food based on how sweet it tastes (and fun fact: humans have sweet ta Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial sweeteners do not raise blood sugar levels. When used instead of sugar, artificial sweeteners help you keep within your carbohydrate goals when planning meals. Artificial sweeteners, or non-nutritive sweeteners offer the sweet taste of sugar, but have no carbohydrates or calories. Artificial sweeteners do not raise blood sugar levels. So when used instead of sugar, artificial sweeteners can help you keep within your carbohydrate goals when planning meals. And because artificial sweeteners have no calories, choosing foods made with artificial sweeteners may lower your calorie intake. Look for manufactured foods and sweeteners for the table that contain one of these 5 sugar substitutes approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration: Saccharin (Brand Name: Sweet and Low, Sugar Twin) Aspartame loses sweetness when cooked. Sucralose, acesulfame-K and saccharin can be used for baking. Look for special baking recipes for artificial sweeteners, as direct substitution for sugar might not give you the result you want. Or, try a combination of artificial sweetener and sugar in recipes to get your desired result while lowering the overall carbohydrate amount. Keep in mind that some artificial sweeteners can be sweeter than equal amounts of natural sugar. A little bit goes a long way. This naturally sweet herb has been used in other countries for centuries. It is not FDA approved for use as a sweetener, but it can be purchased as a dietary supplement in many health food stores. Stevia comes in powder, liquid and tablet form. It doesnt provide calories or impact blood glucose. The FDA has completed careful testing of all the artificial sweeteners. Artificial sweeteners have been shown to be safe to eat. Despite rumors of cancer causing effects of artificial sw Continue reading >>

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