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Are Insulin Shots Painful

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

Bd Answers Questions About Insulin Injection During Pregnancy

Bd Answers Questions About Insulin Injection During Pregnancy

Free Updates HOME Main Forum BD Links: How insulin works Storing insulin Insulin facts & fiction Injection tips Injection sites Injection challenges Injection FAQ Needle disposal Traveling with insulin Lois Jovanovic, M.D., answers questions about pregnancy and diabetes BD answers questions about insulin injection during pregnancy This page is sponsored by BD Diabetes Educators recommend BD syringes to their patients more than any other brand because of the fine, thin BD needles 1. Pregnant women with diabetes seem to prefer to use the stomach as their injection site but are afraid they will hurt the baby. Is this possible? [back to insulin injections during pregnancy questions] Diabetes and Pregnancy - Insulin Injections in Stomach: It is very unlikely that a needle will ever directly hit the baby and cause a problem. However, it is important that injections be into the fat just below the skin and pregnancy can make that harder. In early pregnancy, you can inject as you normally do. But in late pregnancy, the skin of the stomach can become very stretched, with little fat below the skin. If you can pinch up the skin, you can continue to inject into the pinched up area. If you can't pinch up, choose an area at the side of your stomach that has more fat. If you use an insulin pen with a 5 mm pen needle, you may not need to pinch up in this fattier area. However, if you use an 8 mm or 12.7 mm needle, you will still need to pinch up. 2. Can stomach injections increase stretch marks? [back to insulin injections during pregnancy questions] Insulin Injections in Stomach During Pregnancy: No 3. What injection sites can be used during pregnancy, and which are the best? [back to insulin injections during pregnancy questions] Pregnancy and Insulin Injections: During pregnancy you Continue reading >>

25 September 12 Tips For Reducing Pain With Insulin Injections

25 September 12 Tips For Reducing Pain With Insulin Injections

For those of you with diabetes who take insulin, take heart! While insulin injections can sometimes cause pain or discomfort, there are tips for reducing or eliminating pain. Most of the tips reported here are taken from a presentation given by Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM at the Rocky Mountain Metabolic Syndrome Symposium on May 14, 2010. Alcohol After swabbing your injection site with alcohol, wait for it to DRY before injecting insulin. Alcohol can feel like a burning sensation if it gets pushed in along with the insulin. Temperature Injecting insulin that is cold will hurt more than if it is at room temperature. Remove your unopened insulin from the refrigerator long enough in advance before use so that it is at room temperature when you need to use it. Once your vial or pen is in use, you can store it at room temperature (59F – 86F). Insulin vials can be stored at room temperature for up to 1 month. Most rapid-acting or long acting insulin pens can be stored for up to 28 days at room temperature. However, premixed insulin or intermediate N or NPH pens should be stored for up to only 10 – 14 days. Never guess at your insulin's room temperature storage guidelines - always check the information provided with your insulin for number of days it can be used at room temperature. Unopened insulin can be stored in the refrigerator (36F-46F) up until the expiration date. However, once the expiration date is reached, do not use the insulin – discard it. Dose Higher doses can hurt more than lower doses of insulin. For those of you with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight and regular exercise could improve your insulin sensitivity enough so that less insulin is needed to control your diabetes. And for folks with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, good carb counting skills Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: hunger, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. Lantus should be administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once a day at the same time every day. Dose is determined by the individual and the desired blood glucose levels. Lantus may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin glargine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Lantus. Discuss a plan to manage blood sugar with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Painful Injection Tips

Painful Injection Tips

This is a letter that was posted by Carol. Casey had decided his injections had become painful and she asked for help. This is a list of suggestions she received from different members. Here is a copy of Carol's letter. A few days ago, I posted a letter on the list about my dog, Casey feeling the needle lately and asking help from other members. Just wanted everyone to know that things are going a lot better around here at shot time. I received so much help and great advice from members on this list and I want to share it with anyone else that might be experiencing problems at shot time. The following are some of the suggestions I received: 1. Do not use alcohol swab before injection...could sting and actually drag bacteria into the skin. 2. Vary the injection spot...instead of concentrating on shoulder and scruff area, try the sides or hip area. 3. Relax by spending some time petting or massaging him before injecting. 4. A few times every day, pinch and pull up the skin so he won't always see it as a warning that the needle is coming. 5. Associate injection with something positive...like when he is eating....or give him a treat afterwards. 6. Make sure the contents of the syringe are not cold. 7. Hold the syringe flat, parallel to his body. 8. Try injecting the needle with the bevel side up. 9. Try putting the needle up to the body and touching different spots without totally injecting and see if you can find a less sensitive area to inject at. 10. Stay calm in order to keep your pet calm and remember that even though we hate to cause our companions any discomfort or stress that we are protecting them from this disease. more ideas at bottom I also had my vet check him out...his conclusion was that the area has just gotten tender in the four months...to try the hip area Continue reading >>

Smart Patch To Take Pain And Hassle Out Of Insulin Injections

Smart Patch To Take Pain And Hassle Out Of Insulin Injections

3 pictures According to the International Diabetes Federation, 387 million people around the world suffer from diabetes, with this number expected to rise to 592 million by 2035. That adds up to a lot of blood sugar checks, diet watching and insulin shots, but researchers in the US have developed a patch that could revolutionize how the disease is managed. The patch contains of more than 100 microneedles, each automatically secreting insulin into the bloodstream when required. The thought of over a hundred microneedles replacing a single needle might not sound like an appealing trade, but their tiny size makes them less painful than a standard needle despite their numbers. Each microneedle is about the size of an eyelash, with more than 100 crammed onto a patch no bigger than a penny. In developing the patch, researchers at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and North Carolina State University (NC State) sought to mimic the body's beta cells, which both produce and store insulin in tiny sacs called vesicles, as well as signalling the release of insulin into the bloodstream when they detect an increase in blood sugar levels. To create artificial vesicles, the team started with hyaluronic acid (HA), which is a natural substance used in many cosmetics. They then combined HA with 2-nitroimidazole (NI), an organic compound commonly used in diagnostics, to produce a new molecule that was hydrophilic (has an affinity for water) at one end and hydrophobic (repels water) at the other. Similar to the way oil droplets coalesce in water, a mix of these new molecules self-assembled into a vesicle with the hydrophobic ends pointing inwards and the hydrophilic ends pointing outwards. Into each of these vesicle structures, which were 100 times smaller than the width of a human hair Continue reading >>

Ease The Pain Of Insulin Injections

Ease The Pain Of Insulin Injections

Got first-shot fears? Ease apprehension (yours and your child's) and reduce the pain with these tried-and-true tips. Got first-shot fears? Ease apprehension (yours and your child's) and reduce the pain with these tried-and-true tips. Got first-shot fears? Ease apprehension (yours and your child's) and reduce the pain with these tried-and-true tips. Got first-shot fears? Ease apprehension (yours and your child's) and reduce the pain with these tried-and-true tips. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Giving Yourself Insulin Shots

Gestational Diabetes: Giving Yourself Insulin Shots

If you have gestational diabetes and you have not been able to keep your blood sugar levels within a target range, you may need insulin shots. Taking insulin can help prevent high blood sugar. High blood sugar can lead to problems for you and your baby. Insulin is given as a shot into the fatty tissue just under the skin. In pregnant women, insulin usually is given in the upper arm or thigh. Make sure that you: Have the right dose of insulin, especially if you are giving two types of insulin in the same syringe. Practice how to give your shot. Store the insulin properly so that each dose will work well. Your doctor or certified diabetes educator (CDE) will help you learn to prepare and give yourself insulin shots. Here are some simple steps to help you learn how to do it. Get ready To get ready to give an insulin shot, follow these steps: Wash your hands with soap and running water. Dry them thoroughly. Gather your supplies. Most people keep their supplies in a bag or kit so they can carry the supplies with them wherever they go. You will need an insulin syringe , your bottle of insulin, and an alcohol wipe or a cotton ball dipped in alcohol. If you are using an insulin pen, you will need a needle that works with your pen. If the pen is reusable, you may need an insulin cartridge. You may also need an alcohol swab. Check the insulin bottle or cartridge. When you use an insulin bottle for the first time, write the date on the bottle. Insulin stored at room temperature will last for about a month. Read and follow all instructions on the label, including how to store the insulin and how long the insulin will last. Check that a disposable pen's insulin has not expired. This date is usually printed on the pen's label. Prepare the shot Your preparation will depend on whether Continue reading >>

The Least Painful Insulin Injection Sites: Not Just About Location

The Least Painful Insulin Injection Sites: Not Just About Location

The four most recommended sites for insulin injections were chosen because they share two qualities: They have a generous fat layer just beneath the skin into which the insulin is injected, and they have fewer nerve endings than many other areas of the body. None of the four sites – abdomen, back of the upper arm, upper buttocks, upper/outer thigh – is nerve-free, though, so some injection discomfort is normal. The factors that seem to most influence the pain level of insulin injections are a person’s perception and anticipation of pain, the sharpness and maybe the size of the needle, and injection technique. Needle Sharpness and Size A study published about 20 years ago showed the one factor most responsible for increased injection pain was the bluntness of a needle. The needle diameter and dose size had significantly less effect on an insulin users’ experience of pain. Those who reuse needles are injecting themselves with dulled and possibly bent needles. This can do more than just increase pain; a separate study showed that reuse raises the risk of developing lipohypertrophy, a lumpy buildup of fat under the skin at injection sites. Many people today, children and adults, report less pain when using short, narrow-gauge needles – those typically used in insulin pens (4 to 5 mm x 32G). Insulin pen needles also have the advantage of not being dulled by piercing the membrane of an insulin vial or getting accidentally bent since there is no needle cap to remove. Minimizing the Discomfort Besides using each needle only once, there are other ways to minimize pain at the injection site: Use insulin that is at room temperature. Remove all of the air bubbles from a syringe before injecting. Let the site disinfectant (usually alcohol) dry before injecting. Keep the di Continue reading >>

Are Diabetes Insulin Injections Painful?

Are Diabetes Insulin Injections Painful?

Injecting yourself with insulin several times a day to manage your diabetes might be easier than you think. Follow these expert steps to help minimise the pain and calm your fears. 1. Know that it won't be as bad as you imagine Most people are nervous about injecting themselves but soon realise they can handle it. In fact thinking about it is worse than doing it and once you get over the 'hurdle' of the first few injections and become more confident, it's usually pretty smooth sailing. It could be that myths about what's involved are fuelling your fears. Some people think they'll have to inject the medication with a large needle into a muscle or a vein or that insulin injections will hurt more than the finger pricks they've been doing to test their blood sugar. This isn't true. The reality is the needles used to inject insulin are small as the insulin only needs to be injected under the skin (subcutaneously) and you inject into areas that have far fewer nerve endings than your fingertips. There may be some discomfort when the needle is first inserted but to ease any anxiety your doctor or a specialist diabetes nurse can show you the correct way to inject. 2. Use the right tool If big needles freak you out, downsize. Insulin syringes and pen needles range in size and thickness (gauge), so ask your doctor or pharmacist for the most suitable shortest, thinnest one available. It's also important to use a fresh needle every time as just one use will dull the needle causing discomfort if it's reused. Wondering whether you should opt for a syringe or a pen? If you're anxious about getting the dose right then a pen may be the best choice. It's easier to dial the dose on a pen than it is to see the markings on a syringe. Some people also think pens are easier to grasp and that t Continue reading >>

Painful Insulin Injections May Be A Thing Of The Past

Painful Insulin Injections May Be A Thing Of The Past

One of the biggest complaints of those diagnosed with diabetes or fear of those who have heard their doctor’s mention ‘insulin’ is the pain associated with the injections. For millions of people worldwide with diabetes, these painful injections may be a thing of the past soon. This is all possible thanks to an innovative invention from the researches at the University of NC State and North Carolina. What have they created to make these injections go away? An Invention that May Save Lives There are many type 2 patients who refuse an insulin treatment regime simply because they do not want to give themselves insulin injections. Whether they are afraid of needles or simply do not want to deal with the pain that comes along with them, this new invention could literally save their lives. They have designed a smart insulin patch that will detect any increase in blood sugar and then secretes a dose of insulin into their bloodstream when it is needed. This amazing device is no bigger than that of a penny and on it has hundreds of teeny tiny needles that are only the size of an eyelash. These needles are known as microneedles. I recommend reading the following articles: These microneedles really make the world of a difference. They have microscopic storage for units of insulin and the glucose sensing enzymes which will release when blood sugar levels get to be too high. The study conducted had found that this painless little patch was able to lower the blood sugar levels in the mice subjects who had type 1 diabetes for up to nine hours. There is more clinical testing needed and then clinical trials for humans will be required before the patch can be used on patients, but it’s definitely something that is showing wonderful promise for those with diabetes. Removing Human E Continue reading >>

Experience Of Pain From Insulin Injections And Needle-phobia In Young Patients With Iddm

Experience Of Pain From Insulin Injections And Needle-phobia In Young Patients With Iddm

Abstract We studied attitudes towards insulin injections, needle-phobia and the experience of pain when using syringes, pens, insulin pumps and in-dwelling subcutaneous catheters (Insuflon®, Maersk Medical, Lynge, Denmark). 185 children and adolescents with IDDM aged 14.2±4.1 years with a HbA1c of 6.4±1.4% answered a questionnaire using 10 cm VAS scores (0 cm = hardly noticeable pain/not scared of needles at all, 10 cm=unbearable pain, very scared of needles). The VAS score of injections (median and quartiles) with syringes was 1.9 (1.1, 3.5) cm, with pens 0.4 (0.0, 1.3) cm, with in-dwelling catheters 0.4 (0.2, 1.7) cm, when taking a bolus dose with insulin pump 0.0 (0.0, 0.0) cm and when taking a blood glucose test 0.7 (0.1, 2.4) cm. The injection pain declined with increasing age but still several teenagers regarded the injection pain as almost unbearable. Injection pain correlated to HbA1c (p=0.033), age (p=0.0003), their own (p<0.0001) and their mother's (p=0.032) needle-phobia (but not father's) but not to diabetes duration or if parents had tried injections or blood glucose testing. Median needle-phobia score was 0.4 (0.1, 1.4) cm. Overall, 8.3% of the patients, 16.8% of the mothers and 17.7% of the fathers defined themselves as having pronounced needle-phobia (⩾5 cm). Those using in-dwelling catheters reported a higher needle-phobia but their injection pain was in the same low range as for other individuals. We conclude that, for most patients, the pain when injecting insulin is quite small irrespective of injection mode, but for some it is almost unbearable. Parents' attitudes are important for children's acceptance of injections. Injections through an in-dwelling injection aid enables children and adolescents to reduce the pain to levels comparable to thos Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Media contact: Mark Derewicz, 919-923-0959, [email protected] CHAPEL HILL, NC – Painful insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes, thanks to a new invention from researchers at the University of North Carolina and NC State, who have created a “smart insulin patch” that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. The patch – a thin square no bigger than a penny – is covered with more than one hundred tiny needles, each about the size of an eyelash. These “microneedles” are packed with microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes that rapidly release their cargo when blood sugar levels get too high. The study, which is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that the new, painless patch could lower blood glucose in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes for up to nine hours. More pre-clinical tests and subsequent clinical trials in humans will be required before the patch can be administered to patients, but the approach shows great promise. “We have designed a patch for diabetes that works fast, is easy to use, and is made from nontoxic, biocompatible materials,” said co-senior author Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering. Gu also holds appointments in the UNC School of Medicine, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and the UNC Diabetes Care Center. “The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetic’s weight and sensitivity to insulin,” he added, “so we could make the smart patch even smarter.” Diabetes affects more than 387 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 mill Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce Pain Caused By Diabetic Needles And Syringes?

How Can I Reduce Pain Caused By Diabetic Needles And Syringes?

Injecting yourself with cold insulin that has just been taken from your refrigerator will be more painful than if you allow the insulin bottle to warm at room temperature for 30 minutes before using it. Air bubbles can also make injections more painful. To get rid of air bubbles, tap the syringe and lightly push the plunger before removing it from the insulin bottle. Also relax your muscles and avoid rotating the needle when you insert or remove it. Finally, never re-use disposable needles because you can develop an infection. Continue reading >>

Giving Injections To Cats

Giving Injections To Cats

Certain medical conditions can be controlled by the use of drugs that are only available in an injectable format. Two of these conditions are diabetes mellitus, which is controlled by daily insulin injections, and certain allergies, which are controlled by regular injections of allergenic extracts. In many cases, cat owners are willing and able to administer these medications at home. If you decide to provide this treatment to your cat, your veterinarian will review the specific administration technique and make sure that you are comfortable with it. The following questions and answers may help you make your decision. Will the injection hurt my cat? Most cats don't seem to mind routine injections. Disposable single-use needles ensure that the needle tip is very sharp to minimize pain. Your veterinarian will prescribe the appropriate needles and syringes for your pet's needs. What happens if my cat moves when I give the injection? "Some clients find that it is easier to give their cat an injection while he is eating a meal." Ideally have someone assist you while you give the injection, especially when you are just learning how to do it. Try offering the pet a special food or treat as a distraction while you administer the injection. Some clients find that it is easier to give their cat an injection while he is eating a meal. By injecting quickly, you can minimize the chance that your pet will move. Most pet owners find that their pet becomes more cooperative once a routine is established. Is there any danger if he doesn't keep still? Most owners are concerned that they may break the needle off in the skin but this is extremely unlikely to occur. The needle may bend but it is much more likely that the injection will end up outside the pet rather than inside when dealing w Continue reading >>

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