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Are Insulin Pumps Expensive

Insulin Pumps: Cost-effective In The Uk

Insulin Pumps: Cost-effective In The Uk

Almost three and a half years have passed since Professor John Pickup and colleagues reported a thorough meta-analysis of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) versus multiple daily injections (MDI) of insulin in patients with type 1 diabetes. During this period, a number of publications have supported many of the conclusions made by Pickup et al, including the assertion that CSII is associated with improvements in glycemic control versus MDI (1;2). Perhaps the most important of these, at least in terms of influencing decision making in the UK, was the Health Technology Assessment on the clinical and cost- effectiveness of CSII for diabetes for the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) by Colquitt et al (3). Having read this article with considerable interest, we felt that there were some important issues to communicate with the readers. However, on contacting the NHS Health Technology Assessment Programme, we were informed that their journal does not offer the opportunity to respond to previous appraisals in forthcoming publications (although the programme’s website does offer a forum for discussion: Given the potential impact of such publications in the UK and beyond, we found this “closed book” approach concerning, as we believe the website discussion would only reach a very limited audience. We have therefore written to the British Medical Journal to raise this issue and outline what we believe are noteworthy shortcomings of the Colquitt et al. assessment of the cost-effectiveness of implementing CSII versus MDI treatment. The article by Colquitt et al. was based on a literature review made prior to August 2002. By the time of its publication in October 2004, much of its content had become obsolete because material over two years old in th Continue reading >>

Comparison Of A Multiple Daily Insulin Injection Regimen (basal Once-daily Glargine Plus Mealtime Lispro) And Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (lispro) In Type 1 Diabetes

Comparison Of A Multiple Daily Insulin Injection Regimen (basal Once-daily Glargine Plus Mealtime Lispro) And Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (lispro) In Type 1 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE Insulin pump therapy (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion [CSII]) and multiple daily injections (MDIs) with insulin glargine as basal insulin and mealtime insulin lispro have not been prospectively compared in people naïve to either regimen in a multicenter study. We aimed to help close that deficiency. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS People with type 1 diabetes on NPH-based insulin therapy were randomized to CSII or glargine-based MDI (both otherwise using lispro) and followed for 24 weeks in an equivalence design. Fifty people were correctly randomized, and 43 completed the study. RESULTS Total insulin requirement (mean ± SD) at end point was 36.2 ± 11.5 units/day on CSII and 42.6 ± 15.5 units/day on MDI. Mean A1C fell similarly in the two groups (CSII −0.7 ± 0.7%; MDI −0.6 ± 0.8%) with a baseline-adjusted difference of −0.1% (95% CI −0.5 to 0.3). Similarly, fasting blood glucose and other preprandial, postprandial, and nighttime self-monitored plasma glucose levels did not differ between the regimens, nor did measures of plasma glucose variability. On CSII, 1,152 hypoglycemia events were recorded by 23 of 28 participants (82%) and 1,022 in the MDI group by 27 of 29 patients (93%) (all hypoglycemia differences were nonsignificant). Treatment satisfaction score increased more with CSII; however, the change in score was similar for the groups. Costs were ∼3.9 times higher for CSII. CONCLUSIONS In unselected people with type 1 diabetes naïve to CSII or insulin glargine, glycemic control is no better with the more expensive CSII therapy compared with glargine-based MDI therapy. Insulin substitution in type 1 diabetes is based on mealtime rapid-acting and basal insulin, using multiple daily injections (MDIs) or continuous subcutaneous insulin in Continue reading >>

Why Treating Diabetes Keeps Getting More Expensive

Why Treating Diabetes Keeps Getting More Expensive

Laura Marston is one of the 1.25 million Americans who suffer from Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder in which a person's pancreas can't make insulin. She hoards vials of the life-saving medicine in her refrigerator to protect herself from the drug's rising prices. (Jorge Ribas/The Washington Post) At first, the researchers who discovered insulin agonized about whether to patent the drug at all. It was 1921, and the team of biochemists and physicians based in Toronto was troubled by the idea of profiting from a medicine that had such widespread human value, one that could transform diabetes from a death sentence into a manageable disease. Ultimately, they decided to file for a patent — and promptly sold it to the University of Toronto for $3, or $1 for each person listed. It was the best way, they believed, to ensure that no company would have a monopoly and patients would have affordable access to a safe, effective drug. “Above all, these were discoverers who were trying to do a great humanitarian thing,” said historian Michael Bliss, “and they hoped their discovery was a kind of gift to humanity.” But the drug also has become a gift to the pharmaceutical industry. A version of insulin that carried a list price of $17 a vial in 1997 is priced at $138 today. Another that launched two decades ago with a sticker price of $21 a vial has been increased to $255. [This 90-year-old fight over insulin royalties reveals just how much has changed in medicine] Seventy-five years after the original insulin patent expired — a point at which drug prices usually decline — three companies have made incremental improvements to insulin that generate new patents and profits, creating a family of modern insulins worth billions of dollars. The history of insulin captures Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

An insulin pump is a medical device used for the administration of insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. The device configuration may vary depending on design. A traditional pump includes: the pump (including controls, processing module, and batteries) a disposable reservoir for insulin (inside the pump) a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion (under the skin) and a tubing system to interface the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Other configurations are possible. For instance, more recent models may include disposable or semi-disposable designs for the pumping mechanism and may eliminate tubing from the infusion set. An insulin pump is an alternative to multiple daily injections of insulin by insulin syringes or an insulin pen and allows for intensive insulin therapy when used in conjunction with blood glucose monitoring and carb counting. Medical uses[edit] Advantages[edit] Users report better quality of life (QOL) compared to using other devices for administering insulin. The improvement in QOL is reported in type 1 and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes subjects on pumps.[1] The use of rapid-acting insulin for basal needs offers relative freedom from a structured meal and exercise regime previously needed to control blood sugar with slow-acting insulin.[citation needed] Programmable basal rates allow for scheduled insulin deliveries of varying amounts at different times of the day. This is especially useful in controlling events such as the dawn phenomenon resulting in less low blood sugar during the night.[2] Many users feel that bolusing insulin from a pump is more convenient and discreet than injection.[2][3] Insulin pumps make it possible to deliver more pre Continue reading >>

Diabetes An Expensive Disease For Many Canadians, Costing On Average $2.5k Annually

Diabetes An Expensive Disease For Many Canadians, Costing On Average $2.5k Annually

More Days after his Grade 8 graduation, Julie Vanderschot’s 13-year-old son began to have blurry vision and stomach pains. He was rapidly losing weight, had difficulty chewing, was insatiably thirsty and frequently needed to use the bathroom. At the same time, he was taking medication to treat an infected tendon in his foot, which he’d hurt in a bicycle accident. “We initially mistook some of the symptoms as side effects of the antibiotics,” said Vanderschot, a policy analyst in Ottawa. Her son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which the pancreas can’t produce insulin because the immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce it. Insulin is a crucial hormone that helps shuttle glucose from the blood into the body’s cells where it’s used as an energy source. In the weeks and months that followed, the family attended training and education sessions at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), learning how to test blood-glucose levels, administer insulin and adjust dosages, count carbohydrates and manage diet. Vanderschot’s son now sees an endocrinologist every three months. A report from the Canadian Institute of Health released earlier in November, which is National Diabetes Month, noted that Canada has one of the highest rates of diabetes in the world. More than nine million people are living with diabetes or pre-diabetes in this country. It’s a chronic condition that takes a physical toll and has expensive recurring drug fees.For those who are living with the condition, it’s an expensive situation. Under The Canada Health Act, pharmaceuticals and blood-glucose monitoring are covered when administered in hospitals, but if they’re not in a medical ward, diabetics who lack private insurance or those who Continue reading >>

With Same Training, Insulin Pumps No Better Than Injections

With Same Training, Insulin Pumps No Better Than Injections

(Reuters Health) - - Adults with type 1 diabetes may be able to manage their blood sugar levels just as well with multiple daily insulin injections as they can with continuous insulin pumps, a recent study suggests. In type 1 diabetes, a lifelong condition, the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to allow blood sugar to enter cells and produce energy. People with the condition usually have to test their own blood sugar level throughout the day and inject insulin to manage it; otherwise they risk complications like heart disease and kidney damage. Some previous research has suggested pumps may help patients get better blood sugar control than they can achieve by giving themselves multiple daily insulin injections. But patients tend to get more intensive training on managing their blood sugar with pumps than they do with injections, so some doctors have questioned whether better patient education might be the reason pumps get better results. For the current study, researchers set out to answer this question. They offered 260 adults with type 1 diabetes the same education on how to manage their blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, and then randomly assigned participants to use pumps or daily injections. “What the trial shows fairly unequivocally is that education/training can produce considerable benefit, although it leaves many patients still a long way from current glucose targets,” said lead study investigator Dr. Simon Heller, a diabetes researcher at the University of Sheffield in the UK. To compare pumps to injections, researchers examined average blood sugar levels over the course of several months by measuring changes to the hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells. The hemoglobin A1c test measures the percentage of hemoglobin that is co Continue reading >>

Understanding Insulin Sticker-shock

Understanding Insulin Sticker-shock

Why are some forms of insulin so expensive, and what happens if you can’t afford the price? Mary Clark, a realtor in Cincinnati, has grown accustomed recently to being the center of attention at the pharmacy. An independent contractor, Clark has had trouble finding affordable health insurance that covers the costs of the insulin she needs to control her Type 1 diabetes. Since 2012, she’s noticed the price she must pay out-of-pocket has increased steeply; it’s been a big enough leap that even the pharmacists pause in their work when filling her order. “Everyone was just stunned and they would just stand and stare at me,” Clark says. Read “Can I Use Insulin Past the Expiration Date?” She knows many other people with diabetes that are in the same situation, especially those who use long-acting insulin like Lantus. She says she can’t afford pump therapy and she has cut out all other expenses, including doctor’s visits and dental care, to keep up with the cost of insulin. “We do without everything. There will be diabetics who will go without insulin and they can’t,” Clark says. “You won’t make it.” sponsor She’s not alone in worrying about the costs of insulin, although not everyone would notice the same price spikes as Clark, says David Kliff, who owns the newsletter Diabetes Investor.com. It’s the underinsured and the uninsured who feel the brunt of it. People with good health insurance might not even notice, as health insurance companies often demand lower prices from insulin makers for their customers, Kliff says. That’s why two people with diabetes standing in line at the pharmacy might pay dramatically different prices for insulin; the difference might even be a couple hundred dollars per vial of insulin, he says. Read about a woman Continue reading >>

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

Click to go to comparison page: Tandem t-Slim/t-Flex/t-slim G4Roche Accu-Chek Combo Insulet Insulet OmniPod Medtronic 530G With Enlite Animas Vibe Pump System Features in Common: 24-hour toll-free helpline Internal safety checks Child button lock-out Full Training Included Simplified programming Extended bolus options Temporary basal rate options Programmable reminders Downloadable Low battery warning Low insulin warning User-set active insulin time Tandem t:slim, t:slim G4 & t:flex Unique Advantages Potential Drawbacks Bright, full-color touch screen Modern, high-tech appearance Compact, thin dimensions Rapid numeric entry, fastest bolus entry Cartridges hold 300u (t:slim); 480u (t:flex) Can calculate boluses up to 50 units (60 on t:flex) Site-change reminder w/customizable day & time Graphic on-screen history display Carb counting calculator Temp basal up to 250%, 72 hrs Can set duration of insulin action in 1-minute increments IOB & time remaining displayed on home screen Missed bolus reminders customizable by day of week Alert for high temperatures which may spoil insulin Secondary basal programs linked with secondary bolus calculation parameters Web-based download software Compatible w/leur-lock infusion sets Minimal insulin movement with changes in altitude Small buttons can be difficult to activate; screen goes blank if buttons missed 3x Unlock procedure required to perform any programming No integrated clip (must put in a case that has a clip) Tubing connector looks “medical,” can snag on clothing Basal & bolus settings in same time slots; may take several steps to edit Extra confirmation steps with all programming Weak vibrate mechanism No meter link Manufacturer relatively new in pump industry Requires charging 1-2x/week No formal in-warranty upgrade polic Continue reading >>

The Real Reason Insulin Is So Expensive

The Real Reason Insulin Is So Expensive

Insulin costs continue to rise and this is unfortunate considering millions of people desperately rely on it. Insulin is the hormone in our body that allows glucose (sugar) to get into the cells of our body that need glucose for energy. Produced in the pancreas, insulin is considered the “most powerful” hormone in the body. It was first discovered in 1922 and first derived from pigs and cows. In an article published by Estay Greene, director of pharmacy programs at Blue Cross Blue Shield’s North Carolina, Greene explains that about 30 years ago insulin manufacturers eventually created biologic insulin that saved us from our reliance on animals for insulin and brought huge improvements in insulin quality. He writes, and this is a fun fact, that “most insulin is made from E. coli bacteria.” These new insulin are much more similar to what we produce naturally as humans but they are incredibly expensive. The cost of insulin has been consistently rising throughout the life of a now 14 year old, tripling in fact, between 2002 and 2013. This isn’t quite the case for other countries outside the United States, however, so what is happening here that is causing Americans to pay so much? Has Competition Been a Negative Factor? Greene writes that “In the 95 years since insulin was developed, a number of drug companies have been making and selling it. But even with all those companies making insulin, competition hasn’t resulted in lower prices – it’s had the opposite effect. In fact, some brands of insulin have seen prices increase by more than 150 percent in the last five years alone.” He explained that “these price increases can spread like wildfire” with any competitors raising their prices in step with one another. Senator Bernie Sanders along with Repr Continue reading >>

Amrita Insulin Pump And Low-cost, Automated Biomedical Devices

Amrita Insulin Pump And Low-cost, Automated Biomedical Devices

Diabetes is a chronic disorder characterized by abnormal blood glucose levels due to problems associated with insulin production and action. When glucose levels rise too high, diabetes becomes dangerous. Without medical care, it can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke and in late stages can cause blindness, kidney failure and loss of limbs. Worldwide, 285 million people are afflicted, but it is worse in developing countries where less than half the cases go undiagnosed. A staggering 50.8 million affected people live in India. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects that by the year 2030 there will be about 75 million Indians who are diabetic, giving India the dubious distinction of becoming the diabetic capital of the world. Responding to India’s high incidence of diabetes, researchers at Amrita have designed an automated insulin pump, which was recently awarded a patent by the USPTO Patent No: US8,034,019 B2. When the prototype is commercialized, it will be the first of its kind developed in India and one of about half a dozen available worldwide. Normally, insulin pumps are expensive and cost about $4500, making it unaffordable for the average Indian diabetic patient. Considering this, Amrita worked to develop a less expensive, but equally effective pump. The seamless integration of expertise from three Amrita campuses (Amritapuri, Coimbatore & Kochi) enabled the development of this user-friendly pump based on dual micro-controller technology, with features not found in other designs. Thanks to Amrita’s insulin pump inventors, India could be better equipped to treat the rising numbers of diabetic patients and manage the problems associated with this complex disease. Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Having A Child With Diabetes

The Cost Of Having A Child With Diabetes

We all know the ultimate cost that living with Diabetes places on the PWD and their families. The mental burden of living with diabetes and caring for someone that lives with Diabetes can become overwhelming as it is. While previously we discussed about the increasing prices of insulin and its rise to an all-time highs, it is only a small piece of the puzzle, a small glimpse of the bigger picture of what it truly costs for someone with diabetes to stay ALIVE each and every month. We are not talking about just managing, or being healthy, but staying ALIVE. Let that word sink in for a moment with you. Yes, there are medications one takes to feel better, ibuprofen for a headache, or Tylenol for aches and pains, however, insulin and other diabetes related supplies are the few things that stand between someone with diabetes and death. Am I being over dramatic? Not really when you think about it, insulin is not a cure; it is not a medication you can miss for a day and still be okay the next day. While you may not necessarily DIE from one missed day of a dose of insulin, I can tell you that you will not feel good at all and may actually end up in the hospital. As you may be aware, I have two children who have type 1 diabetes, so I know a little bit about the costs of living with it, even though I do not live with the disease myself. I wanted to put together something that showed those with and especially those without diabetes how much it truly costs for people with this chronic illness to LIVE. The Burden of Diabetes The one thing that has always bugged me about this disease other than the most common reasons is the financial cost it takes to keep someone with Diabetes alive! Thankfully, we have insurance that covers for the majority of the cost, but I know there are people o Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Price

Insulin Pump Price

Did you get the best insulin pump price? What is the right insulin pump cost on a monthly basis? How do you get the best deal? It can be frustrating to find good information. The answer to these questions depends on your circumstances. Let’s take a look below. IF YOU HAVE INSURANCE Okay, so you want a pump, now here comes the tough part: The insulin pump price. Let’s talk about insurance first. If your doctor finds it medically necessary, and your insurance company accepts his opinion, then you get it for free! The insulin pump cost is nothing. Good stuff. Of course, this assumes there is no deductible associated with your policy. Wahoo! IF YOU DON’T HAVE INSURANCE Now let’s talk about the cost if you have no insurance. Hold on, brace yourself. The cost is approximately $6,000 for most pumps. It gets worse. The ongoing cost of running the pump each month can vary from about $150 to $300. Ouch! So, you don’t have insurance and you don’t have $6,000. What are your options? Most pump manufacturers and/or their suppliers do have programs where you can get the pump for a nominal cost, possibly for free. Why would they do that? You guessed it. They want your monthly maintenance business. Let’s say the cost of running your insulin pump is $225 a month. Take this amount and multiply it by 48 months (4 years) which is roughly the lifespan of the pump. This comes to $10,800. In order to get the lower price (or free) pump, you typically have to commit to purchase their supplies for the life of the pump. Is it wrong to compare this to a pusher who gives you the initial vile of crack cocaine for free, knowing he owns you and your drug habit for life? Yeah, it probably is wrong, but it is a little fun anyway! To see the Latest Insulin Pump Prices click on the link. OTHE Continue reading >>

Clinical And Cost-effectiveness Of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion For Diabetes

Clinical And Cost-effectiveness Of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion For Diabetes

Go to: Epidemiology and background There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes involves a process of destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas, leading to severe insulin deficiency, so that insulin treatment is required for survival. It represents about 10-15% of all diabetes in England and Wales. Type 2 diabetes is much more common, and is characterised by insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Type 2 diabetes is linked to overweight and obesity and to physical inactivity. The number of people with insulin-treated diabetes has increased owing to the marked increase in the incidence of Type 1 diabetes and also to a greater number of people with Type 2 diabetes being treated with insulin to improve diabetic control. There has also been an increase in the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes, particularly among the Asian community. Poor control of diabetes, reflected in high blood glucose levels, can in the short term result in diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious and potentially fatal condition, and in the long term increase the risk of complications such as diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. However, studies have shown that good diabetic control is associated with a reduced risk of these complications. If insulin levels are too high and blood glucose falls, hypoglycaemic episodes occur. The effects of a hypoglycaemic episode depend on how low the blood glucose level falls, varying from mild and rapidly corrected by food or sugary drinks, to severe where help is required. Severe hypoglycaemia can lead to unconsciousness, convulsions or death. There are several problems with current treatment. In the non-diabetic state, the body needs a little insulin all the time (basal insulin) boosted by increased output after meals. This is difficult to achieve with Continue reading >>

What Is The Cost Of Insulin Pump Therapy?

What Is The Cost Of Insulin Pump Therapy?

WITH ELIGIBLE HOSPITAL INSURANCE YOU COULD GET COVERAGE FOR AN INSULIN PUMP If you’re living in Australia - the cost of the insulin pump is generally fully covered by your insurance provider depending on your level of hospital cover (assuming the appropriate waiting period has been served). In choosing the health fund that’s best for you, it doesn’t necessarily have to be the most expensive level of cover. If in doubt, check with your private health insurer for what is covered. If you or a family member has Insulin Dependent diabetes, you may be interested in the options available to manage the cost of insulin pump therapy: Do you have more questions on private health insurance? Read the FAQ on private health insurance Learn more about the Bridging the Gap Program , T2 Grants Program and Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Deals Discover whether you are eligible for funding from the CGM Initiative Above costs are unique to insulin pump therapy vs multiple daily injections. Does not include additional costs related insulin, glucagon, test strips, wipes, and lancing devices. 1 Based on a Medtronic survey of the average cost of $3.28 per day for hospital policies with coverage for insulin pumps. Price of hospital policy is based on singles cover in NSW for a person under 65 years old, assumes no Lifetime Health Cover Loading and Base Tier Government Rebate included. The cost of the pump is generally covered by your insurance provider depending on your level of hospital cover. 2 Your credit card will be charged in two instalments. Make the first $375 payment on credit card, then six weeks after Guardian™ 2 Link and initial sensor box is shipped, the second $375 payment will be deducted and second box shipped. The CGM Protector Kit and associated products can only be Continue reading >>

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

While everyone’s diabetes treatment plan, medications, and technology may be different, there is one thing we can all agree on: diabetes is expensive. In two previous posts at The Perfect D, I gave some sense of what the bare minimum of care for a U.S. adult with Type 1 diabetes would be and also financial resources and programs to help with the financial burden of living with diabetes. However, this post is about how much it could cost an adult with Type 1 diabetes if they used the technology and medications that are currently out on the market (and thought of as “the latest and greatest”) and paid out of pocket with no insurance. Research on this topic has shown me that: 1) prices can fluctuate wildly, so it pays to shop around and 2) there is a very big gap (financially, medically, and technologically) between the bare minimum and “surviving” and actually utilizing the tools and latest technology that is out there. So, the hypothetical person for this exercise is a Type 1 adult in the United States who weighs 60kg, just like the other calculation post I did. Ground Rules These prices are accurate on the websites I have referenced for December 1, 2014. They may change, they may add shipping, they may not offer the services, technology, or drugs on their website after this is posted. These prices are not a guarantee. They are to be used as a reference. The listing of prices/websites on this post does not mean that I endorse the company or product or service. I have not listed all the products available on the market for people with Type 1 diabetes. I have listed major ones to give you an idea of major manufacturers’ costs for the products that are available for general public viewing. I did not call any companies and ask for pricing. Why? Because I believe Continue reading >>

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