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Animas Ping Vs Vibe

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

While everyone’s diabetes treatment plan, medications, and technology may be different, there is one thing we can all agree on: diabetes is expensive. In two previous posts at The Perfect D, I gave some sense of what the bare minimum of care for a U.S. adult with Type 1 diabetes would be and also financial resources and programs to help with the financial burden of living with diabetes. However, this post is about how much it could cost an adult with Type 1 diabetes if they used the technology and medications that are currently out on the market (and thought of as “the latest and greatest”) and paid out of pocket with no insurance. Research on this topic has shown me that: 1) prices can fluctuate wildly, so it pays to shop around and 2) there is a very big gap (financially, medically, and technologically) between the bare minimum and “surviving” and actually utilizing the tools and latest technology that is out there. So, the hypothetical person for this exercise is a Type 1 adult in the United States who weighs 60kg, just like the other calculation post I did. Ground Rules These prices are accurate on the websites I have referenced for December 1, 2014. They may change, they may add shipping, they may not offer the services, technology, or drugs on their website after this is posted. These prices are not a guarantee. They are to be used as a reference. The listing of prices/websites on this post does not mean that I endorse the company or product or service. I have not listed all the products available on the market for people with Type 1 diabetes. I have listed major ones to give you an idea of major manufacturers’ costs for the products that are available for general public viewing. I did not call any companies and ask for pricing. Why? Because I believe Continue reading >>

Animas Vibe: First (and Quick) Impressions.

Animas Vibe: First (and Quick) Impressions.

Again, disclosure: I work with Animas and have a sponsorship contract. Here are more details on my disclosures. I link to my disclosures more than I link to cat .gifs, which is saying QUITE A BIT. As I mentioned, I’m testing out the Animas Vibe. Here are my first, quick impressions after a few days using the Vibe. (What, you wanted some long, flowery introduction paragraph? I’m out of words.) First things first. Change can be awkward and uncomfortable. When I switched from Medtronic to Animas back in 2010, I had trouble with the switch not because of the pumps themselves but because of the change, in general. Wearing an insulin pump means being connected to a small box and tubing 24 hours a day, so you really get to know that box/tubing combination. The curves and edges of the pump became something I knew by heart, and wearing a pump that was even half a millimeter different than whatever I was used to made me grouchy. It took me about three weeks to become used to wearing the Animas Ping pump, and about a month and a half to become entirely used to the differences in filling the reservoir, changing the infusion set, responding to alarms, etc. (I experienced this all over again when I took the t:slim pump for a spin over the end of the summer. The pump itself was fine but the different size/shape/process made me grumpy like this cookie and I was less accepting of the pump because it wasn’t what I was accustomed to. This isn’t a comment on which pump is superior, but a commentary on why the learning/acceptance curve, for me, is a true curve. It also illustrates my hate for change.) I was set up on the Animas Vibe on 12/31, so I haven’t had this thing for more than a few days, but going from Ping to Vibe was simple in terms of learning curve because I’d alread Continue reading >>

Safety Information Article

Safety Information Article

Safety Information Article Information on this page is limited by the terms of our Disclaimer. Please Read! Insulin Pumps An insulin pump allows the replacement of slow-acting insulin for basal needs with a continuous infusion of rapid-acting insulin. By using an insulin pump, the patient can typically match the dosage of insulin to lifestyle and activities, rather than adjusting those to the body’s response to insulin injections. The advantages of using an insulin pump include the fact that it replaces the need for periodic injections by delivering rapid-acting insulin continuously throughout the day via a catheter, which greatly simplifies the management of diabetes. There are two basic types of insulin pumps, one is used as an external device and the other is implanted. Both types currently pose hazards to patients referred to MRI procedures. For an external insulin pump, in general, the device typically needs to be removed and kept out of the MRI environment to ensure that there is no adverse impact on the functionality of the external pump. The information below provides examples of MRI information for several, commonly used insulin pumps. Insulin Pumps, Animas Corporation This MRI information pertains to the following insulin pumps from the Animas Corporation: Animas 2020 Insulin Pump IR Animas 1200 IR 1000 Insulin Pump IR 1100 Insulin Pump IR 1200 Insulin Pump OneTouch Ping Insulin Pump Each insulin pump indicated above should not be exposed to very strong electromagnetic fields, such as MRIs, RF welders, or magnets used to pick up automobiles. Very strong magnetic fields, such as that associated with MRI, can “magnetize” the portion of the insulin pump’s motor that regulates insulin delivery and, thus, damage the device. For the patient: If you plan to u Continue reading >>

Animas Or Medtronic | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Animas Or Medtronic | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hey guys, I'm new to this so not sure if I'm doing this right! I was diagnosed T1 6 months ago and I've been doing really well with injections but I'm desperate to get a pump in the hope of finding a treatment that's as close to a pancreas as possible, as I'm sure you all feel too! I've been offered an Animas pump (they haven't specified which unfortunately) or a Medtronic Minimed 640g. I know I'd like a smaller pump which is more discrete and takes less regular checking of sugars possibly. Does anyone use either of these and what do you think of it? To be honest there's probably more checking of sugars with the pump! But if you work hard at it, put the effort in and commit to making the pump work for you, it's brilliant for improved control, more flexibility and less restrictive in terms of being able to adjust a basal rate and not being stuck with the dose you've already given for that day and having to work round the basal! I went for the animas because it's waterproof and I can swim with it attached. I've found it easy to use and work with. Sent from my D5803 using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app Hey guys, I'm new to this so not sure if I'm doing this right! I was diagnosed T1 6 months ago and I've been doing really well with injections but I'm desperate to get a pump in the hope of finding a treatment that's as close to a pancreas as possible, as I'm sure you all feel too! I've been offered an Animas pump (they haven't specified which unfortunately) or a Medtronic Minimed 640g. I know I'd like a smaller pump which is more discrete and takes less regular checking of sugars possibly. Does anyone use either of these and what do you think of it? Anim Continue reading >>

Animas To Leave The Insulin Pump Market Amid Competitive Pressures

Animas To Leave The Insulin Pump Market Amid Competitive Pressures

The announcement does not affect LifeScan, which makes blood glucose management tools and apps. Company officials said an exclusivity deal between Medtronic and UnitedHealthcare was among the factors that contributed to the decision. Animas Corporation, part of Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Care, will stop making insulin pumps amid competitive pressures and emerging technology trends, the company has announced. “We are incredibly grateful to our patients and healthcare partners for the trust confidence and loyalty they have placed in Animas products over the last 12 years,” said Valerie Asbury, Animas general manager, in a statement released late Thursday. “With rapidly changing needs of customers, rapidly evolving market dynamics, and increased competitive pressures, it proved too difficult to sustain the insulin pump business and we decided to pursue and exit of the business.” Animas will cease the sale of its Vibe and OneTouch Ping pumps in the United States and Canada, but it will honor warranties. Thus, a patient who needs a replacement pump will be able to get one, said Bridget Kimmel, senior manager for communications and public affairs for Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Solutions, in an interview with The American Journal of Managed Care®. Decisions about the exit in other countries requires consultation with work councils, she said. Kimmel said the majority of Amimas’ 90,000 pump users are within the 4-year warranty period, and most will be within warranty through September 30, 2019. As reported last month in Evidence-Based Diabetes Management™, the insulin pump market faces multiple pressures. First, an exclusivity agreement between market leader Medtronic and the nation’s largest payer, UnitedHealthcare, was seen by analysts as a threat to at least 1 Continue reading >>

Animas Vibe | Shsl

Animas Vibe | Shsl

October 25, 2016 Awareness , Technology #insulinpumptherapy #insulin #diabetes #diabetic #pwd #insulina # typeonediabetes #t1dlookslikeme #insulinpump #blood glucoselevels #multipledailyinjections #MDI #onsulindoses #basal #bolus #diabetesm , Animas vibe , BGL , blood sugar , Diabetes mellitus type 1 , Type 1 diabetes sugar high sugar low Leave a comment Before I embarked on my journey, with an insulin pump, I had been on multiple daily injections (MDI) for almost 15 years. It wasnt until I began to learn about insulin pump therapy that I truly grasped how different the two were. With MDI, I feel less training was given in order for me to manage my diabetes. I didnt learn how to carb count or even have an understanding of what insulin sensitivity was. The main focus of my diabetes management was to administer my insulin (my doses were worked out by the doctor and diabetes nurse, based on my blood glucose readings) when I needed to take it and checking my blood glucose levels. It was only with insulin pump therapy that I began to have a better understanding of my diabetes management. I had to undergo a process of training before I was given free reign with my pump. I had to learn how the pump worked and in doing so, I had to develop my understanding of carb counting, insulin to carb ratios, insulin sensitivity, and basal rates. All of which, I have, to be honest, I had no idea what it even meant. I think this is because the nutrition and diabetes management were explained primarily to my mother but this information was very basic and she very much had to figure a lot of it out for herself. This then carried on into my transition from the childrens hospital to the adults clinic. The insulin pump, I think isnt for everyone, it takes a lot of work to make it work. Diabetes Continue reading >>

Hi Everyone, I'm Looking To Get A New Pump (currently Using Omnipod, Not Happy With Performance). Any Recommendations Or Info On T-slim G4 Or Animas Vibe?

Hi Everyone, I'm Looking To Get A New Pump (currently Using Omnipod, Not Happy With Performance). Any Recommendations Or Info On T-slim G4 Or Animas Vibe?

Hi everyone, I'm looking to get a new pump (currently using OmniPod, not happy with performance). Any recommendations or info on t-slim g4 or animas vibe? Hi everyone, I'm looking to get a new pump (currently using OmniPod, not happy with performance). Any recommendations or info on t-slim g4 or animas vibe? I'm a mom supporting a child with type 1 diabetes since 2009. supporting a spouse with type 2 diabetes since 2015. personally I wished we waited for tslim g4 I hate the buttons on animas but there is a app called tstimulator for tslim . I'm a mom supporting a child with type 1 diabetes since 2009. supporting a spouse with type 2 diabetes since 2015. other then that I like it .but tslim g4 has the cgm on screan animas don't but animas water proof 24hrs so they both got there perks I have the Animas Ping and I love it....When the warranty is up I still haven't decided if I'll get another ping or go to tslim....I love the remote feature of the ping and am hesitant to give it up. but I think either company is a solid choice depending on which features are most important to you I've used all of them for a trial. I spent two months wearing different pumps in March, April and a bit of May. I ended up staying with the Medtronic pump, but going with the Dexcom for my CGM. Living with type 1 diabetes since 2001.Living with LADA since 2001. I don't see a point of getting pump with integrated Dexcom. Now with G5 what is the point? Regarding pump, they all have similar performances , it's all about your personal preferences. I have used ALL the pumps, but Omnipod is best fit for me. Thanks for the suggestions. I currently have the Dexcom g4 so I would rather have it integrated. I've had other medtronic and animas pumps in the past and like to try new things, so maybe the T-Slim Continue reading >>

Animas Vibe Brings Dexcom Cgm Onto The Pump Screen

Animas Vibe Brings Dexcom Cgm Onto The Pump Screen

twitter summary: Animas Vibe brings Dexcom CGM onto the pump screen, eliminating the need to carry a receiver. Plus, a guide to choosing a new pump. The Animas Vibe insulin pump will begin shipping in the US this month following FDA approval on November 25. The pump can talk directly to the Dexcom G4 Platinum transmitter, bringing CGM data right onto the Vibe’s screen and eliminating the need for a separate Dexcom CGM receiver (though one can still be used, if desired; see below). The advance represents improved convenience – combined viewing of CGM and insulin data allows for better real-time decision-making, as well as more comprehensive downloads. The Vibe is the first pump on the market to integrate Dexcom CGM, and it has received good reviews since it first became available in Europe in 2011. Aside from integrating the Dexcom and a few changes to the user interface, the Animas Vibe is largely identical in look, feel, and design to its predecessor, the OneTouch Ping (available since 2008). This piece discusses my experience trying out the Vibe over the last few weeks, assesses upgrade/cost details, and evaluates some key factors to consider for those choosing between the six different pumps now available (Animas Vibe, Asante Snap, Insulet OmniPod, Medtronic MiniMed 530G, Roche Accu-Chek Spirit Combo, and Tandem t:slim). Dexcom CGM Data on the Animas Vibe Biggest wins CGM value + Insulin-On-Board screen provides an outstanding real-time snapshot of current glucose/insulin state; one button push to access. One fewer device to carry around (but if desired, a separate G4 Platinum receiver can be used along with the Animas Vibe). Very simple setup to get G4 Platinum data on pump. Areas for Improvement CGM trend-graph screen is harder to read and lower resolution than Continue reading >>

The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump & Cgm System

The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump & Cgm System

3 In a clinical trial, the overall mean absolute relative difference (MARD) between sensor readings and YSI values was 13%. In other words, on average Dexcom G4® PLATINUM sensor readings and YSI readings differed by only 13%. From a study of 60 patients using the Dexcom G4® Sensor with a hand-held receiver first calibrated at 1-hour and then approximately every 12-hours following. Similar overall performance has been seen with 1-hour and 2-hour initial calibration. The transmitter and receiver used in the Dexcom G4® Sensor clinical trial were different than those used with the Animas® Vibe® system, but the Dexcom G4® Transmitter and Animas® Vibe® pump function similarly to the transmitter and receiver used in the trial but with a 2-hour initial calibration. The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump and CGM System is intended for the delivery of insulin and for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for the management of insulin-requiring diabetes. The Animas® Vibe® System’s CGM, which includes the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter, is indicated for detecting trends and tracking patterns in persons age 2 and older. The system is intended for single patient use and requires a prescription. Contraindications: Insulin pump therapy is not recommended for people unwilling or unable to test their blood glucose four to six times per day, unwilling or unable to see their healthcare professional regularly, or whose vision or hearing does not allow recognition of pump alerts, warnings, and alarms. The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump must be removed before MRI or CT scan, and the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter must be removed before MRI, CT scan, or diathermy treatment. Taking acetaminophen-containing medications while wearing the sensor may falsely raise sensor Continue reading >>

Pump Choices - Omnipod Vs. Animas Vibe - Advice Needed.

Pump Choices - Omnipod Vs. Animas Vibe - Advice Needed.

My son has been on the Omnipod pump for 5 years now. Since they changed to the slimmer design and new PDM we have been having all kinds of issues including: pumps not sticking well, insulin becoming less effective on day 3, occlusions, etc. This all has led up to two hospitalizations in the past week because pump issues were not detected early enough and lead to DKA. For now he is on injections, but I would like to put him back on a pump. Has anyone had their child on the Animas Vibe? Do you know how it compares to the Omnipod from a personal standpoint, not just charts that the pump sites show? I like that these two pumps are waterproof as we do a lot of swimming. I am just scared to go back to the Omnipod given everything that has happened. Also, any advice on pump wearing supplies if I do switch him to the Animas pump? Thank you!!! My son has been on the Omnipod pump for 5 years now. Since they changed to the slimmer design and new PDM we have been having all kinds of issues including: pumps not sticking well, insulin becoming less effective on day 3, occlusions, etc. This all has led up to two hospitalizations in the past week because pump issues were not detected early enough and lead to DKA. For now he is on injections, but I would like to put him back on a pump. Has anyone had their child on the Animas Vibe? Do you know how it compares to the Omnipod from a personal standpoint, not just charts that the pump sites show? I like that these two pumps are waterproof as we do a lot of swimming. I am just scared to go back to the Omnipod given everything that has happened. Also, any advice on pump wearing supplies if I do switch him to the Animas pump? Thank you!!! Hi,my first suggestion no matter what pump you choose to use going forward is to have a majority of basal Continue reading >>

My Animas Vibe #pumptrial

My Animas Vibe #pumptrial

Since mid-2012, I have received product and supplies gratis from Animas (a Ping insulin pump with monthly supplies). In December 2014, I was provided with the Animas Vibe system, a Dexcom G4 Platinum sensor, and a Diasend kit to evaluate at no charge to me. Following are my impressions about the product as I experienced it. Animas has not seen or vetted this post prior to me publishing it. Dec. 19 I started a trial of the Animas Vibe insulin pump : Animas Vibe #pumptrial is on! Will report in the coming days. Already liking quite a few things! pic.twitter.com/cAPDem5yhh Manny / Diabetes (@askmanny) December 19, 2014 Since the start of the trial I enjoyed seeing a few small things that I had longed having on my pump. But I will start with the bigger things that most PWD who are not on the Vibe may be wondering about. I am fairly open about my personal preference towards the Dexcom G4 CGM given its accuracy vs. other CGM systems in the market. So any pump that integrates with it I favor over others because CGM has been a diabetes technology that has saved my life countless times. While Tandem is on track to integrate with the Dexcom G4 next, and Asante will do so with the G5 further down the road, at this point the Animas Vibe is the only insulin pump that integrates with the Dexcom CGM. Manny / Diabetes (@askmanny) December 20, 2014 Seeing on the same screen the glucose trend arrows along with the Insulin On Board (IOB): priceless! The transmitter you use with the Animas Vibe is the chubby G4 (see it on the left, below), not the slim one (on the right, below). Not a HUGE deal just a HUGE transmitter. Get it? The new (slimmer) Dexcom transmitter pic.twitter.com/V5YMxoQEoC Manny / Diabetes (@askmanny) November 12, 2014 Heard this from fellow #DOC members, Melissa Lee and Continue reading >>

Animas | The Girl With The Portable Pancreas

Animas | The Girl With The Portable Pancreas

Animas , BG , Dexcom , Insulin pumps , OmniPod Stacey D. The definition of revolution, according to Google, is a forcible overthrow of a government or social order for a new system. I am starting to think that my diabetes devices are starting a revolution. I am not sure what new system they would like. Maybe a working natural endocrine system? That would sure be nice! I have been using the OmniPod system for 19 months; the new generation system for over 2 of that 19 months. Within that time frame Ive only had a few instances of bad pods or issues of that nature. Until recently. I obviously cannot prove that these new issues are due to the mechanics of the new pods. However since I havent had issues before, that is what I am lead to believe. A couple of weeks ago I had three pod issues in a row two bleeders and one that was leaking insulin. On various site locations. I took a break from the pods for almost 2 weeks. Today was day 3 of my first pod since that break. And I got an occlusion during my breakfast bolus. Unfortunately I did not have an extra pod with me nor any syringes (that situation was remedied as soon as I got my hands on my supply) and I had to go home from work to get insulin. Not the best situation to be in. When I removed the pod, there were no visible signs of cause for an occlusion. Taking another break. Also, I have been using a Dexcom CGMS for almost 5 years; the G4 system for 9 months of those 5 years. For most of that time I have used my outer thighs primarily for sensor sites since I cannot use them for infusion sites (due to lack of absorption). No major problems other than the occasional failed or wacky sensor, one bad transmitter and one broken receiver. In all that time. Then all of a sudden in the past few weeks I have had numerous bleeding Continue reading >>

The High-tech Business Of Diabetes

The High-tech Business Of Diabetes

Diabetes is big business. If you don't believe me, just Google the term "diabetes is big business" to see the headlines that agree. As of 2012, $245 billion was spent in the United States alone per year, and that has some people believing there will never be a cure—there is too much money in it. Maybe that's true, maybe not. But there are plenty of companies out there making products intended to help those afflicted. What Is Diabetes? Here's the quick, highly over-simplified primer on the disease if you're not up to speed. Diabetes mellitus, more often called just diabetes, maybe even DM, or "the diabeetus" if you're a fan of Wilford Brimley, comes in a few forms. The first is called Type 1 (aka T1), a chronic autoimmune disorder where the pancreas can no longer effectively produce the insulin hormone needed to manage the glucose (sugar) a person eats, mainly from carbohydrates. If you can't make insulin, your body gets hyperglycemia—that's too much sugar (high blood glucose). On the converse, diabetics are also easily prone to hypoglycemia—not enough sugar—caused by taking too much insulin (thus the term "insulin shock"), or even missing a meal or getting too much activity. Type 1 used to be called juvenile diabetes because you can get it as a kid and then you have it the rest of your life. T1s are entirely dependent on insulin from an outside source; and taking the right dosage means constantly monitoring blood glucose level. There is no known cause of T1, but it's likely a mix of genetics and environment. Type 2 (T2) diabetes was once considered "adult-onset diabetes," but can occur in kids. Patient's bodies can make insulin, typically, but develop a resistance to it; then may stop altogether. Sometimes T2s need insulin injections, sometimes just diet adjustm Continue reading >>

Getting My Vibe On With Animas, After Years Of Anticipation

Getting My Vibe On With Animas, After Years Of Anticipation

For two weeks during the holidays, I test-drove the new Animas Vibe combo device (Animas insulin pump plus Dexcom continuous glucose monitor) approved by FDA just over a month ago. We appreciate this opportunity for a trial-run of this exciting new device before it officially hits the market in the coming weeks. This is only the second combined insulin pump-CGM product ever made available in the U.S. (after Medtronic’s system), and the first to include the popular Dexcom G4, and it’s been a loooong time coming; Dexcom and Animas first announced their joint-development agreement back in January 2008, and this integrated system was launched overseas in mid-2011. There’s been a lot of buildup here in the States, before and after Animas filed with regulators in April 2013, so I had high hopes going into this two-week trial. {Disclosure: JnJ supplied me with the full system and supplies to last circa 16 days. As always, this was under the agreement that they would have no influence over what we say or write.} In the words of my awesome Animas educator during my training in late December: You can think of this system in terms of a dwelling — the two components used to be separate housing units, but now they co-exist under the same roof and are more like different rooms within one big home. Now anyone using it gets all the benefits of that combined home’s plumbing, heating, air conditioning, and so on. I found that there are good and not-so-good things about the Vibe, and as with everything, opinions will vary. Sadly, nothing wowed me personally about the Vibe, and even the built-in CGM isn’t enough to convince me it was worth the wait, or convince me to purchase this system for myself. Keep in mind: I’m coming at this from more than a decade of happy Medtronic p Continue reading >>

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

2016 Insulin Pump Comparisons

Click to go to comparison page: Tandem t-Slim/t-Flex/t-slim G4Roche Accu-Chek Combo Insulet Insulet OmniPod Medtronic 530G With Enlite Animas Vibe Pump System Features in Common: 24-hour toll-free helpline Internal safety checks Child button lock-out Full Training Included Simplified programming Extended bolus options Temporary basal rate options Programmable reminders Downloadable Low battery warning Low insulin warning User-set active insulin time Tandem t:slim, t:slim G4 & t:flex Unique Advantages Potential Drawbacks Bright, full-color touch screen Modern, high-tech appearance Compact, thin dimensions Rapid numeric entry, fastest bolus entry Cartridges hold 300u (t:slim); 480u (t:flex) Can calculate boluses up to 50 units (60 on t:flex) Site-change reminder w/customizable day & time Graphic on-screen history display Carb counting calculator Temp basal up to 250%, 72 hrs Can set duration of insulin action in 1-minute increments IOB & time remaining displayed on home screen Missed bolus reminders customizable by day of week Alert for high temperatures which may spoil insulin Secondary basal programs linked with secondary bolus calculation parameters Web-based download software Compatible w/leur-lock infusion sets Minimal insulin movement with changes in altitude Small buttons can be difficult to activate; screen goes blank if buttons missed 3x Unlock procedure required to perform any programming No integrated clip (must put in a case that has a clip) Tubing connector looks “medical,” can snag on clothing Basal & bolus settings in same time slots; may take several steps to edit Extra confirmation steps with all programming Weak vibrate mechanism No meter link Manufacturer relatively new in pump industry Requires charging 1-2x/week No formal in-warranty upgrade polic Continue reading >>

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