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How Are High Blood Pressure And Diabetes Related?

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Blood Pressure

High blood pressure is often common in people with diabetes Blood pressure is the pressure of the blood in the arteries as the heart pumps it around the body. High blood pressure can result in increased risks of stroke, heart disease, kidney disease, eye disease and nerve damage Diabetes changes the body chemistry in a way that increases the risk of blood pressure People with diabetes should get their blood pressure checked regularly Causes of High Blood Pressure Some of the causes of high blood pressure are not known, although it is known that it tends to run in families. Lifestyle factors such as being inactive, overweight, smoking, drinking a lot of alcohol and eating a lot of salt can also increase your risk. Benefits of Managing Blood Pressure Good management of blood pressure for people with diabetes is extremely important in decreasing the risk of: Stroke Heart disease Kidney disease Eye disease Nerve damage. When to Check Your Blood Pressure Have your blood pressure checked at every doctor’s visit, at least: Every six months for people with normal blood pressure Three months for people with high blood pressure Every 4-8 weeks if your blood pressure medication is being cha Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. ckosmo29

    Sugar in Urine

    Pre-diabetic here with a question. Do you have to have sugar in your urine to be diabetic? Talked to the nurse at my dr.'s office after the thyroid test came back okay. She said my urine looked fine, no sugar so they would do a fasting in December and they weren't concerned about my post meal 150's and 160's.

  2. bsc

    Originally Posted by ckosmo29
    Pre-diabetic here with a question. Do you have to have sugar in your urine to be diabetic? Talked to the nurse at my dr.'s office after the thyroid test came back okay. She said my urine looked fine, no sugar so they would do a fasting in December and they weren't concerned about my post meal 150's and 160's. In most cases, sugar appears in your urine only at higher levels, 200-300 or higher. Dumping sugar in that way is your bodies extreme response to getting rid of blood sugar levels that are becoming toxic. You can be diabetic and never observe sugar in your urine. On the other hand, if you are trying to use sugar in your urine as a measure of whether you have diabetes, it is perhaps the worst indicator.
    Sugar in the urine will show you when things have gotten really bad. Please use a blood sugar meter to check things. A morning fasting number is a good way to keep track of things. A morning fasting of < 110 mg/dl is great. You readings 2 hours after meals should be < 140 mg/dl. Your readings at 1 hour may be higher, but worry mostly about the fasting and 2 hour numbers. Unless you have kidney problems or a rare form of diabetes (like MODY-3), you generally won't see any sugar in your urine even during post meal spikes of 150-160.

  3. jcinfla

    As bsc said, typically only at levels above 200 does glucose appear in the urine, after crossing what is called the "renal threshold". This is the point at which the kidneys can no longer process the amount of glucose in the bloodstream and begin dumping it into the urine to get it out of the body.
    However, this level is different for all people, and some people even without diabetes have a very low renal threshold and excrete glucose into the urine at BG levels well below 140, called renal glycosuria which is typically a benign genetic variant that produces this condition.
    The reason the medical community stopped using urine glucose to determine diabetes and sugar levels is that again it is so variable person to person and wildly inaccurate. While it may be a great way to pick up someone who may be undiagnosed, for instance while testing for something else, it certainly stands to reason that with your spikes to 150 or 160 you would not see any glucose in the urine.

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